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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

The Matlock Police series (originally simply titled Matlock) was commissioned from Crawford Productions by ATV-0, in response to the popularity of rival-network police dramas such as Homicide and Division 4. Crawford's was initially reluctant to create another police series, but ATV-0 pressured the company for some time. Eventually, Ian Jones and Terry Stapleton devised the concept of a regional (Victorian) police series to provide viewers with something different. The more relaxed atmosphere of the country-town setting also allowed the writers to delve into the private lives of the main characters, rather than focusing heavily on big-city organised crime. In this respect, the series was situated somewhere between Homicide/Division 4 and Bellbird. The series did, however, cover typical rural policing, including such issues as break and enters, domestic issues, itinerant workers, brawls, petty crime and robberies, road accidents, the occasional homicide, and cattle rustling. On other occasions, the Matlock police also assisted Melbourne police in locating criminals on the run (among other problems). The idea behind the show was to reflect the causes of crime in a small community and show the effects on both the community and the officers themselves.

The fictional town of Matlock (loosely based on Shepparton in Victoria) is situated inland on the Central Highway, approximately 160 kilometres north of Melbourne. Although the town's population is only seventeen thousand, this increases to around seventy-five thousand when the district is included. The Matlock Police Station is typical of a Victorian country town, with a Uniform Branch and a Criminal Investigation Branch (CIB). The CIB is headed by Detective Sergeant Vic Maddern, who grew up in the Matlock district and is an accomplished bushman. Second in command is Detective Allan Curtis, aged in his mid-twenties. Previously from Melbourne, Curtis has just been sent to his first country posting (against his will) when the series begins. Head of the Uniform Branch is Sergeant Bert Kennedy, an Englishman who migrated to Australia in 1950. A thorough but also easy-going man with a good sense of humour, Kennedy is married to Nell and enjoys the country life in Matlock, so much so that he has knocked back promotion to avoid moving to Melbourne. Several constables are attached to the Uniform Branch, but the most prominent is a motorcycle cop, Constable Gary Hogan, who performs a wide variety of duties. Hogan is about thirty, a friendly, easy-going person who grew up in the country and is always willing to help in whatever work is going.

Notes

  • There is no relationship between the Matlock Police series and the real but very small township of Matlock, sitiuated in the ranges east of Melbourne.

Includes

16
form y separately published work icon Heroes' Day Ian Jones , 1971 Z1638571 1971 single work film/TV crime
— Appears in: In Focus : Scripts from Commercial Television's Second Decade 1972; (p. 133-155)

This episode of the long-running series Matlock Police deals with the divide between anti-war protesters and an Australian tradition. When a young protester throws paint over the Matlock War Memorial in the lead up to Anzac Day, tempers flare in the town.

1971
18
form y separately published work icon A Second Opinion Douglas Tainsh , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1971 Z1924052 1971 single work film/TV crime

'Goods are being hijacked from trucks all over Victoria, obviously in a highly organised network. The Matlock police are called on to catch the hijackers in their area.

'Their investigation leads them to "Buttercup" Sands, a small time criminal who operates a second-hand building materials yard and who proves to be responsible for the local operation of the hijacking ring.

'As a sub plot, there is the story of Monty, son of Sands' de facto wife, Edie, by an earlier liason [sic]. Monty is both physically spastic and suspected to be autistic. The police feel that Edie may not be a fit mother for the child. Helping Monty is complicated by the fact that a chiropractor has been treating the boy's physical condition and clashes with the medical profession over what can best be done for him. This story reaches a climax when Monty escapes from home and falls down a mine shaft, to be rescued by Sergeant Maddern and the chiropractor.'

Source: Synopsis held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection (RMIT).


The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection includes the following character notes (excluding regular characters):


'TONI CARBONI American Italian aged about 40. Qualified Chiropractor, quietly spoken, thoughtful. Has been in Matlock only a few years. Physical trainer in local football team.


'DR. SUTHERLAND Established.

'"BUTTERCUP" SANDS About 40. Small time crim, operates a second-hand building materials yard, fire wood, etc. Impulsive, rather stupid, can be aggressive, arrogant. Known to Maddern. Has done time for larceny and assault. DRIVES.

'EDIE 30±. Sands' defacto wife. Rather a slob, easy going, careless, untidy, has had to battle during the last eight years to bring up her autistic boy. Has only been with Sands for the past few months.

'MONTGOMERY (MONTY) 8 years old. Edie's boy. Austistic, also only able to walk or run with an extremely awkward gait. Does not speak other than to sing an endless "Da-da, Ma-ma" type of song into notes. It seems impossible for him to communicate. Totally withdrawn into himself. Is never fully still except when drawing.

'JACK BIRSETT Small farmer - a few cows, continually broke, has always supplemented his income with petty larceny. His farm is near Sands' yard. DRIVES.

'TRANSPORT DRIVER Any age, any type, capable of this fairly tough occupation. DRIVES.

'PASSING MOTORIST Any age - a few lines. DRIVES.

'TWO UNIFORMED POLICEMEN (both F - one L).

'A NURSE One scene - no lines.'



Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1971
21
form y separately published work icon The Gypsies Terry Stapleton , 1971 Z1912789 1971 single work film/TV crime

'Frank Scott reports to the police that he has been robbed and bashed by a group of gypsies during a journey home from Melbourne to Matlock.

'The gypsies' story however differs in some details. They agree that they stopped Scott's car on the road, but they deny the robbery and claim that one of the men of the tribe (Alexis) assaulted the Australian only when Scott tried to molest one of the gypsy girls.

'Alexis is arrested for the assault, and has to spend the night in jail. This is a source of distress to him, as his wife is about to give birth to her first baby and gypsy lore demands that he should be there. When the gypsies help Alexis escape during the night, Sergeant Maddern follows them to their camp, only to find the wife in obstetric difficulties, a problem solved by Jeannie MacIntyre, Maddern's nursing sister friend from Melbourne.

'The police also prove that Frank Scott's money was not his own, and was not stolen by the gypsies - it was the proceeds of a number of supermarket robberies, and Scott had spent it during a weekend in Melbourne. Scott and his partner in the robberies are apprehended.'

Source: Synopsis held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection (RMIT).


The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection includes the following character notes:

'ALEXIS KATSAVAKIS Late 20's. Good looking young gypsy. Likeable personality, emotional - under great stress when separated from his pregnant wife. Drives a car, fights with Maddern. Large part.

'FRANK SCOTT Mid 30's. A plausible slob. Rough voice and manner. Treats his wife like dirt and is responsible for Alexis being wrongfully jailed. Drives a car. Large part.

'RENA KATSAVAKIS Early 20's. Alexis's sister. Attractive high spirited. The rebel member of the gypsy family. Fiercely loyal and protective but basically very likeable. Medium large part.

'PATERA KATSAVAKIS 50-60. The father of the tribe. An impressive man of high principles. Very much the Patriarch. Medium part.

'JEANNIE MCINTYRE As established.

'MARICA Early 20's. Alexis's wife. Pregnant throughout. Only a few lines but a key figure - must convey the pain and anguish of a labour full of problems. Medium part.

'HELENE Early 20's. Alexis's sister. Bright, likeable but a much less positive personality, than her sister Rena. Medium part.

'MITERA KATSAVAKIS 50-60. The mother of the gypsy tribe. Proud of her ability as a mid-wife and will not hear any criticism. Medium.part. [sic]

'NICK KATSAVAKIS Early 20's. Alexis's younger brother. Rather intense. Co-operates with Rena in a plan to "spring" Alexis from the Matlock cell. Drives a car. Medium small part.

'GYPSY CHILD Boy aged 9. 2 lines.

'GYPSY CHILD Girl aged 7 or 8. 2 lines.

'OWEN TAYLOR: 40ish. Rather objectioable [sic] small time crim. Fairly uncouth. 3 scenes.

'MANAGER OF SUPERMART 50ish. No lines, one scene.

'EDGAR 50ish. A town drunk. Will be amusing if played straight. A likeable character well known and happily tolerated by the Matlock Police.

'MISS FALCONER As established. 2 scenes.

'NANCY SCOTT. Late 20's Alikeable appealing long suffering wife [sic] who hopes she's pregnant, but gets no support from her husband.. [sic] Medium part.

'DAVID WALKER J.P. 40-50 An un-imaginative no-nonsense professional man, who has no sense of humour. Rather patronising to the gypsies. One important scene.

'JUDY BROWN. Early 20's. A prostitute, attractive in a cheap and nasty way. 2 scenes.

'DET. PETER STEVENS. 30 ish. A rather stolid man. doggedly doing his duty. [sic] Has a long rather formal speech. One scene.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1971
35
form y separately published work icon Compassionate Leave Ian Jones , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1971 Z1923318 1971 single work film/TV

'When Johnny Marcelli returns from Vietnam on compassionate leave, he is told by the police and the rest of his family that his father has committed suicide. Johnny, however, refuses to believe this, and sets out to solve the mystery of his father's death for himself.

'This course of action brings him into conflict with the police and also with the people on properties adjoining his father's. The farmers in the area have had poor seasons, and all, with the exception of the Marcelli family, want to sell their farms to the Horizon Development Company, which plans to amalgamate the properties and which has profitable outlets for the farmers' producp. [sic]

'Johnny's first suspicion is that Paul Moran, the development company's representative, has killed his father during an argument, and to force the truth out of the man, takes him on a terrifying ride around the mountain ranges outside Matlock.

'When all the facts are available, however, the killer is proved to be one of the neighbouring farmers, Tom Farrell. Farrell argued with Mr. Marcelli about selling the farm, and a rifle went off accidentally. As there were no witnesses, and he knew the Marcellis were in financial difficulties, he hoped the idea of suicide would be acceptable.

'The story climaxes with a hunt through the bush in which the police try to reach Johnny before he can kill Farrell.'

Source: Synopsis held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection (RMIT).


The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection includes the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'JOHNNY MARCELLI Early twenties, younger, Australian-born son of an Italian family, matured by service in Vietnam. Normally a good-looking, likeable boy, his personality is eroded by depression and suspicion associated with the death of his father. A sense of personal guilt unbalances his innate single-mindedness to the point of obsession.

'LEONARD JACKSON 40's. The hard, plausible, and - when he likes - charming head of a high-pressure pastoral company.

'TOM FARRELL About 50, physically tough, but emotionally edgy and unstable - worn-down by the fight to keep his property going.

'PAUL MORAN 30's. The "rough diamond" field officer for Jackson's pastoral company. Lacking his boss's smoothness, he can nevertheless be very likeable or, when required, hard as nails.

'MOMMA MARCELLI 60's. Newly-widowed, still unable to adjust to the realities of this new life. Only occasionally do we detect flashes of the real spirit and vitality of the woman.

'ANDREA MARCELLI About 19, a pleasant, attractive girl. More level-headed than Johnny, deeply devoted to him and to her mother.

'TINA FARRELL About 20, a mature, strikingly attractive girl - self-possessed, slightly tentative outside her family circle.

'HARRY TOMKINS: 40's, a bull-at-a-gate farmer. Excitable, still able to laugh at himself.

'SECRETARY Late teens.

'TRAIN PASSENGER About 40, a talkative, well-meaning, totally insensitive local.

'TRAIN PASSENGER EXTRAS F. only.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1971
36
form y separately published work icon End of the Road Cliff Green , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1971 Z1932363 1971 single work film/TV crime

'The initial police enquiry in this episode is into a series of wool thefts from properties near Matlock. The men involved are two bush workers with strong arms and weak heads. Travelling with them is an older man, Jim Atkins, who appears to have nothing to do with the robberies, but whose personal life is a mystery.

'The source of this mystery is revealed in a story running parallel to that of the wool stealing activities. Atkins is an alias, and the man's real name is Peter Gould. Twenty years before, he was a farmer in the Matlock district, and one night accidentally killed an intruder on his property. Fearing that it would look like murder, he fled, leaving his pregnant wife behind. His wife and daughter still run the farm between them. Gradually Gould drifted into an itinerant life, sending money home from time to time. Now he has discovered that he has an incurable disease, and has come back to see his family before he dies.

'Constable Hogan is personally involved in this episode. He has been taking out Gould's daughter Marion, and it is through his knowledge of the family that the mystery of Gould's life is unravelled.'

Source: Synopsis held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection (RMIT).


The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection includes the following character notes:

'JIM ATKINS 45-50. Real name Peter Gould. Itinerant shearer and bush worker. Nora's husband. Marion's father. Cleared out from Nora following the death of an intruder on their farm 20 years before. Now suffering from an incurable disease. During these years away, Jim has lived a sort of half life. He now returns in the company of Bob and Lennie, intending to tidy up his life before it is too late.

'BOB JONES 25-30. Itinerant bush worker and thief with a tendency to violence. Has a certain grudging respect for Jim which doesn't run too deep.

'LENNIE DALEY 25-30. Bob's side-kick. Strong in the arm, weak in the head. Has affection for Jim, is rather more genuine.

'MARION GOULD 20. Jim and Nora's daughter. An attractive, intelligent girl who has been her mother's backstop for a long time now.

'NORA GOULD 40-45. Jim's wife, Marion's mother. She has coped, somehow, with rearing Marion and running the farm in Jim's absence. She has never grown bitter with Jim or the world. Something happened, Jim went and that was that. Now her carefully erected barrier against despair is torn down.

'TOM BAXTER 40-60. The theft of his wool adds one more burden to the many being borne by this economically depressed sheep farmer, but Tom remains pretty philosophical about it all.

'PHIL SANDERS 30-40. Second victim of the wool thefts. Phil would be better described as "grazier" than "farmer". A well spoken contrast to Tom Baxter.

'COMMERCIAL TRAVELLER Age optional. Bob taps him on the head and steals his car.

'MRS. SANDERS Very much her husband's wife. Age 30-40.

'OCKER: 50-70. Bar fly with a long memory who befriends Jim.

'"FARMER" JOHNSON 40-60. Shady dealer in wool and other agricultural produce who has no scruples and fewer friends.

'BARMAN AT THE LONERGAN PUB

'EXTRAS Drinkers at the Lonergan pub.

'ACTUALS Ambulance officers.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1971
38
form y separately published work icon The Foreigners Sonia Borg , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1971 Z1914104 1971 single work film/TV crime

'Among the migrants who have come to Australia since the second world war [sic] is a group of Albanian Moslems, whose religions and customs have made their assimilation into the rest of the community difficult.

'This episode deals with a feud between two young Albanians, the Mustapha brothers, and an older man, Abdul Sadik. The police involvement increases as the Albanians grow more violent, and an attempt is made on Sadik's life, apparently by one of the younger men.

'Investigation of the incident proves that it is not the Mustapha brothers who are responsible, but a bigoted Australian who hates foreigners.

'Interwoven with the main plot is the situation of Sadik's wife Naeema. Her arranged marriage to Abdul is a source of unhappiness because he treats her as a possession rather than a human being.

'Sadik realises how much he needs her, but by then it is too late to save the marriage, and she leaves Matlock to start a new life.'


Source: Synopsis held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection (RMIT).


The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection includes the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'ABDUL SADIK: Albanian, in his late forties. As a result of hard work he has become a successful market gardener. He is Muslim, firmly believing in the traditions and laws of the past. His family ruled the village he comes from before Albania became a Republic. He is stubborn, proud, harsh in his views. Has neither the desire nor the ability to adjust to his new country.

'Married to a woman who is more independent than the traditional Muslim wife. This causes constant friction, particularly as he knows she is better educated than he and fears that she despises him.

'HAS TO DRIVE CAR AND TRUCK. (Very little truckdriving involved.)

'NAEEMA SADIK: In her thirties, came to Melbourne in her teens and went to an Australian school for three years. The marriage to Sadik had been arranged by her family and she has been unhappy ever since.

'KEITH EVANS: Australian; in his late twenties; a truckdriver. Goodnatured, reasonably intelligent, thoroughly likeable. An inborn sense of chivalry. Strongly attracted to Naeema whom he sees as mysterious, helpless and victimised.

'HAS TO DRIVE TRUCK WELL.

'RON EVANS: Keith's father. In his late fifties; Australian. Runs beef cattle. An aggressive brute - primitive and cunning. Jealous of his son. In spite of his prejudice against foreigners, he is interested in Naeema.

'MRS. EVANS: Keither's mother. Late forties. A simple woman, basically kind. Resigned to her life.

'YOSEF MUSTAPHA: Early twenties; Albanian. Quick tempered, proud, resentful. Hates Sadik who has tried to dominate him and stoops at nothing [sic] to annoy and humiliate the older man.

'OMAR MUSTAPHA: About thirty years old. More sensible and restrained than his younger brother. Feels responsible for what has happened but does not have the strength of character to stop his younger brother Yosef's actions.

'MR. FORD: Middle-aged businessman. Very drunk - is at police station because he cannot find his car. Tries to 'establish a dialogue' with the foreigners. Has a quick change of mood when they don't co-operate.

'MR. JONES: Australian; owns a large Produce Store. Should have a quiet authority and should be tall and well-built. The type who can stop a fight with just a few words.

'DRIVER OF CAR: A middle-aged man who is involved in a car accident.

'MR. ADAMS: Elderly, rather simple person. Lives in Matlock proper and knows everything that's going on.

'WILLIE SCOTT: About 40 years old, a farmhand. Laconic, curious, likeable. Australian accent.

MUST DRIVE TRACTOR.'



Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1971
56
form y separately published work icon What the Eye Doesn't See Don Battye , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1972 Z1932391 1972 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection includes the following character notes:

'CLIVE WILLIAMS Man in his early 30's. Building contractor who has become involved in stolen goods racket to help overcome financial difficulties. Basically a bad businessman - when faced with crisis, is inclined to go to water. Sincere, quite good looking.

'SUSAN WILLIAMS His wife, mid 20's. Blinded in an accident not long before. Attractive - strong will, refuses to give in to her plight. Could have been Clive's strength had he been honest with her.

'VIN WILLIAMS Clive's elder brother. In his 40's. A tough parasitic no-hoper. Has been involved in crime most of his life - this time, goes too far. Sadistic quality.

'JENNY Clive's "girl Friday". Slightly kooky, pleasant, efficient, in her 20's.

'DOUG THOMAS Man in mid 30's. Building inspector - takes himself perhaps too seriously. Underneath, probably a normal bloke, but has a touch of the Government Official .... enjoys his title.

'NEDDY Gnarled old contact for stolen goods. Runs a very run-down garage. Lives for what he can get out of life. Cryptic in conversation.

'HERB ARMSTRONG Local bricklayer. About Clive's age, but smaller physically. Normal bloke - just wants his money.

'UNIFORMED CONST. (GRAEME) A slight hint of the know-it-all, very young, inexperienced, keen.

'GARAGE ATTENDANT Youngish. A friendly Stanley, who is perceptive enough to sense something wrong when Hogan is in car with Vin Williams.

'2ND CONST. At Wilga roadblock.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1972
57
form y separately published work icon Cheeky Charlie Douglas Tainsh , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1972 Z1924088 1972 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection includes the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'CHEEKY CHARLIE: 65. "Cheeky Charlie" had been a fairly well known Tiv personality at the time of "Mo", George Wallace, etc.

'When Charlie started to slide (through a combination of T.V. and the bottle) he and his assistant, Bluebell [sic] took to the road. Charlie put on the occasional show for the kids, including punch and judy [sic] and tuned pianos when he could get the work. He deludes himself that he could always stop drinking the moment he felt like it, but blames the lack of $100 or so to get new costumes and a good, reliable agent. Then, he says, he can make his big come-back.

'BLUEBELL: His assistant for the last thirty years. She has now gone completely to seed. Not educated. Single. Loyal. Accepts whatever life has to dish up.

'BERNARD AUSTIN (BIG BERNIE): 45. Old acquaintance. Itinerant (ex side show pug) Big man. His boxing days have left him with some brain damage. Slow, can be violent.

'JUDY AUSTIN: 28. His wife. Much younger. A bit tarty. Well worn, but has worn well.

'COLIN: Young, handsome, uni student. Arrogant. Completely sure of himself.

'DAVID: Colin's mate. Also from uni. Quieter, he looks up to Colin, tries to emulate his outlook.

'HEWITT: Farmer where they're working.

'EXTRAS (4): Pickers.

'1ST WOMAN: Housewife. Mid-aged. Retiring nature. No sense of humour.

'2ND WOMAN: Housewife - any age.

'DOCTOR:

'TEACHER AND SCHOOL CHILDREN: Actuals if possible.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1972
59
form y separately published work icon The Cow Hand John Dingwall , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1972 Z1917634 1972 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'ATHOL HUTCHINS Lead. About 30. Shoulder length hair, and a wild beard. (Certainly not trimmed). He's a hippie.

'TOM WOOD Second lead. About 60. Has been a very powerful man (physically)

'WILLIAM WOOD Major role. Twenty one years of age. Must have short back and sides haircut.

'KENNY WOOD Major role. Nineteen. Short back and sides haircut.

'MICHAEL WOOD Major role. Sixteen. Short back and sides haircut.

'William, Kenny, Michael are Tom Wood's sons.

'JACK FLYNN Important role. About 45. Short back and sides haircut.

'DOREEN FLYNN Very important role. She's sweet sixteen and has been kissed. She's very young, a slip of a girl.

'MRS. FLYNN Jack's wife. About the same age. Preferably thin and worn.

'PUBLICAN Character Noel Buchanan, as established in earlier episode

'NORM HARRIS The mayor. But a rough, country looking type of mayor with not too much up top. About 60.

'AUCTIONEER 40-45.

'BARMAID 35-40.

'WORKER IN SALEYARDS

'PRIEST About 50. Benign.

'SAM One scene but important. He's about 50, and a dirty, lazy old pig.

'EXTRA Woman in street (teaser).

'EXTRA Woman in street (end of script)

'EXTRAS Crowded bar scene.

'(Budgeted for 12 extras but budget can take 17.' [sic]


Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1972
61
form y separately published work icon A Weekend's Entertainment David William Boutland , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1972 Z1915780 1972 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'RAY JONES Early 20's. Looks younger. Killer who is nothing without a weapon in his hand. Drives.

'LIZ JOHNSON Plump nymphet, about 18. Institutionalized, hard, but dominated by Jones.

'ALICE PRICE About 24. Middle class. Had an unhappy romance. Wants to rebuild her life on her own, away from her family.

'JOAN PRICE Mother, late forties. Understands that the middle class life has made her unable to appreciate her daughter's problems, and unable to help her. But can't change now.

'JACK PRICE Father. 50ish. Ex-farmer who has been intelligent enough to build a small business when the outlook for farmers faded. Comfortable but not wealthy. A man who puts his family first. Capable of violence only in final anger and despair. Drives.

'JOCK BROWN 50ish. Must be small, wispy in stature. He's happily drinking himself to death and has a sense of humour about most things in life. [Note: The character's name on the casting call sheets is 'Edgar Browne', though the 'Browne' has subsequently been crossed out.]

'DOCTOR BEDI

'UNIFORMED CONSTABLE (A) One scene with a line of dialogue otherwise an extra.

'UNIFORMED CONSTABLE (B) Extra.

'UNIFORMED CONSTABLE (C) Extra.

'UNIFORMED CONSTABLE (D) Extra.

'MAURIE TAYLOR Middle aged garage owner. Rough natured, but friendly. Lived in the country all his life.

'AMBULANCE MEN Actual.

'HELICOPTER PILOT Actual.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1972
63
form y separately published work icon Confessional Tom Hegarty , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1972 Z1921799 1972 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection includes the following character notes:

'DES MUNRO Early thirties. Small time crim, moderately successful. Trying to enlarge his field by using gelignite to blow safes. Specialises in jobs on churches - which is linked beneath the surface to a deep religious upheaval somewhere in his past. Disparage, scoff, protest as he may, there is still some belief lingering there.

'FRAN CARMODY Early-mid twenties. Catholic. Very strong on religion. Believes everybody should have some sort of faith. Doubtful about Munro at first, but decides that he is in need of spiritual help and that perhaps she can supply it, or part of it. Possibly attracted to him as well, but too self-possessed and single minded to let it show.

'DOREEN LANE 35-40. Has been getting around with Munro for some time. Returns with him to Matlock to see her father - and also to pick up some easy money. (She helps in a minor way with his jobs). Conscious of the age difference between herself and Munro, suspicious of any younger woman in whom he takes an interest. Has been kissed-off so many times before, she is determined not to let it happen again.

'TED LANE Around 60. Possibly older. Doreen's father. A farmer who has tried to discipline his daughter from an early age. Now reconciled to her loose behaviour, no longer voices his disapproval - but still retaining some hopes for her.

'FATHER RYAN 50-60. Priest of Matlock's largest Roman Catholic church.

'OXLEY 30-40. Though age not important. Explosives expert called in to defuse the sacristy safe.

'SIMPSON 40-50. Runs a small farm on the outskirts of Matlock. Well known for his anti-religious, particularly Anti-Catholic [sic] views.

'WHITEHEAD Late teens, early twenties. Boozy young lout who gets a kick out of playing around with explosives.

'SYKES Whitehead's mate, same age, attitudes - but subservient to Whitehead.

'HUTCHINSON Licensee of the Railway Hotel, about the lowest grade hotel in Matlock.

'EXTRAS For church scenes, also for montage.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1972
72
form y separately published work icon If Maria Dies, The World Stops Martin Robbins , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1972 Z1912625 1972 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection includes the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

VINCENTE GARELLI: Early 20's. Typical Sicilian. Passionate and strong willed. Drives.

MARIA GARELLI: 20. Italian. Mature for her age. (6 months pregnant).

LEN: Middle twenties. Vincente's friend. Drives.

BILL THOMAS: 40-50. Drinks heavily. Lazy. In debt. Likes women. Drives.

ELSE THOMAS: 42-50. Drinks, because of her husband. Drives.

JACK WILMOTT: 50's. Vincente's boss. Kind man. Thinks a lot of Vincente. Drives.

MRS. WILMOTT: 50's. Like her husband.

FATHER DAWSON: Catholic priest.

JOE FLETCHER: 30-40. Suspect. Has been involved in similar accident, but not convicted. (Lack of evidence).

DR. BEDI: As established.

NURSE:

UNIFORMED CONSTABLE: Young.


Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1972
76
form y separately published work icon Guide Dog Luis Bayonas , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1972 Z1914346 1972 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'NEIL THOMAS: Blind. Incredibly fit. Good looking. 50. Authorative, ex-Army.

'ANNE: His niece. Beautiful 21 year old nymphet.

'BURGLAR: Good looking, well spoken, intelligent with a sense of humour.

'TOM ROBERTS: 60's. Hard working farmer.

'MR. HIGGINS: 40's. Smooth, but boring salesman.

'MR. PITTS: Grocer.

'FRUITERER: No lines.

'DELICATESSEN SALES ASSISTANT: No lines.

'TOBACCONIST: No lines.

'TRUCKIE: No lines.

'LADY DRIVER: No lines.

'MAN: Owner of stolen car.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1972
79
form y separately published work icon Ghosts Sonia Borg , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1972 Z1914061 1972 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection includes the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'MRS. ANNA CZOSKI: About sixty years old: powerful personality. Her son is her only reason for living. She deeply resents her Australian daughter-in-law.

'JOSEPH CZOSKI: Mid - to late thirties. Well educated, charming, a little soft. Has married for sake of convenience. Feels guilty towards his mother.

'JILL CZOSKI: Mid-thirties. Plain, apparently ordinary country woman. Is expecting her first child. Has a primitive hatred against Mrs. Czoski and tries her best to get her out of the house.

'MR. BELL: Mid-forties. Friendly straight forward type. Australian.

'MRS. BELL: His wife. Same type of person but also interested in the occult.

'DR. BEDI:

'CONSTABLE JENKINS:

'CONSTABLE JONES:

'MISS JACKSON: District Nurse. Down-to-earth, hearty, domineering.

'MAN FROM FORENSIC:

'FATHER CAMERON: Catholic Priest, matter-of-fact type of person.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1972
82
form y separately published work icon Chain Reaction Patrick Edgeworth , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1972 Z1928932 1972 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'FRED BAKER: Late 30's. Gullible. Is his own worst enemy. Would believe that he is the victim of "bad luck" not realising that he makes his own, most of the time. A man who needs the security of a family and a regular job.

'JEAN BAKER: Thirties. Quite attractive. Has lost any respect for her husband some time ago. She looks up to Jack O'Brien as a real man. Drives a car.

'JACK O'BRIEN: Late 30's. Genuinely in love with Jean Baker, and fond of her children. This affair is no casual thing - and he hopes to marry her. Drives a car.

'ALEC BELL: Mid-thirties. Noveau Riche. Smooth confident man who might occasionally show his humble origins. Too well-dressed, sleeve cuffs showing perhaps overdoes it with a handkerchief in top pocket. He smiles easily. Would be successful in any business that required synthetic charm, and bundles of enthusiasm. To him success means more personal possessions. He loves his car, which is an expensive imported one (plot point) tends to be pleasant only to people he needs.

'JOE EVANS: About the same age as Fred Baker. They would have known each other since school days. Joe is the salt of the earth, always willing to give a mate a hand. Confirmed bachelor, with a cynical view of women. If he ever needed a woman - he'd pay for her.

'GEORGE EVANS: Late thirties. A naturally cautious man who is finally taken in by Bell's salesmanship. An ordinary everyday person who would never make a salesman, though the idea of having his own business appeals to him.

'SHIRLEY EVANS: Mid-thirties. Simple soul who is readily taken in by Bell's charm. The thoughts of the riches to come, blind her to the realities of Bell's scheme.

'(ANN BAKER: 7 years.

'(MARIE BAKER: 9-10 years. (Only a few lines. Fred and Jean's two children).

'POLICE CONSTABLE (UNIFORMED): Few lines.

'TWO EXTRA POLICE CONSTABLES (UNIFORMED):

'TWO YOUTHS: Teenagers (one scene).

'MOTORIST: One scene. No lines.

'FOUR EXTRAS: Bell's meeting.

'2 AMBULANCE MEN: Actuals. One scene.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1972
84
form y separately published work icon The Rising Cost of Giving George Mallaby , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1972 Z1932402 1972 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection includes the following character notes:

'JUDY WINTER. 20. Average young girl. Quiet and attractive. Goes to pieces after the attack mainly because of her mother.

'DAVID THOMPKIN. Early 20's. Introvert, in love with Judy, but afraid to approach her. His frustration builds up and he attacks Trevor and rapes Judy.

'MR. WINTER. Middle 40's. Kind, understanding, but weak. Stands up to his wife to a certain extent, but not all the way as she owns their farm and he is afraid of losing everything.

'MRS. WINTER. Middle 40's. Her main concern is the "Winter name". Feels that Judy is at fault and brought on the attack. Is a very hard woman, completely lacking in understanding and compassion.

'WALTERS. 20's. Works where Judy was employed. Big mouthed, with a distorted sense of humour. Not a very nice fellow.

'MAN 1. Early 20's. One scene - lines.

'MAN 2. Early 20's. No lines.

'TREVOR. Judy's boyfriend - nice ordinary young man.

'POLICEWOMAN. Sympathetic character.

'OFFICE GIRL. About 18. Ordinary type.

'OFFICE MANAGER (MR. HUGHES). 50's. Ordinary sort of guy. Feels sorry for Judy, but is perhaps embarrassed by her.

'PHOTOGRAPHER (LAURIE). Not police. Young artistic type.

'RADIO ANNOUNCER 1 & 2 (V.O)

'NURSE

'DR. MITCHELL

'WOMAN SHOPPER. 40's. Few lines.

'PUBLICAN. Lines.

'FOUR EXTRAS. Men and women (For Ladies Lounge). No lines.

'AMBULANCE MEN (2) Actuals.

'SOLDIER (UNIFORM) No lines.

'UNIFORMED CONSTABLE. No lines.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1972
90
form y separately published work icon Terror on the Loose Patrick Edgeworth , 1972 Z1929024 1972 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'CARL REID: About thirty. Hard, tough. He's been in trouble as long as he can remember. He knows no other way of life than committing crimes and trying to avoid the consequences. Roz is his soft spot.

'ROZ THOMPSON: Mid twenties. Though young in years, she's been around. Attractive, resourceful, tough. She's completely wrapped up in Carl and would do anything for him. Drives.

'ROCKY WALKER: About forty. One time boxer turned stand-over man. He's almost a match for Carl. Has the same creed of looking after No. 1 first. He is homosexual, but this is not obvious in his appearance or mannerisms.

'TONY GREY: Early twenties. Pleasant, good looking. He is completely out of his depth with Carl and Rocky. Before Gaol he would have led a quiet life working in an office and living at home.

'BENNETT: Thirties. Preferably tall to contrast with Smith. Affable. Easy going.

'SMITH: Thirties. Somewhat overweight. Pessimistic glutton.

'BRIAN YOUNG: Forties. Affable. Considers himself the life and soul of any party. Flying is his life.

'JILL: Twenties. Attractive country girl. Drives.

'JOE: Fifties. Amiable - but tough when confronted by Carl Reid.

'GUARD (JACK): Any age. Few lines.

'GUARD (JIM): Any age. Few lines.

'DOCTOR FOX: Any age. Few lines.

'FARMER: Middle age. No lines.

'EVANS: Forties. Slight, shifty man. Few lines.

'ANDERSON: Forties. Big, bluff, no nonsense man. Few lines.

'TAYLOR: Thirties. Preferably bigger than Evans. Few lines.

'POLICE CONSTABLE: Any age.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1973
91
form y separately published work icon Cup Fever Alan Cram , 1972 Z1921498 1972 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection includes the following character notes:

'BARNEY WHITE: Aged about 28-30. Trotting driver. Energetic personality. Reckless gambler. Quick tempered but should be likeable. Has to drive a car.

'JOE SIMPSON: About 60. A quiet, calm, trotting trainer. Been in the game all his life. Lives for his horses. Is concerned when he gets threatening phone calls demanding that he scratch his horse from the Matlock Cup.

'KATE WHITE: Aged about 28. Barney's wife. She should be attractive. Lived in the country all her life. She does not fit in with Barney's world of racing and gambling. She is concerned for Barney and their future together.

'POP THOMPSON: Aged about 70. Kate's father. Retired. Tight with his money, which he has plenty of. Has a dry, impatient attitude towards Barney who he doesn't understand or approve of.

'LENNIE WILLIAMS: Aged about 35. A big heavy. Not very bright. Has to handle himself in a fight. Has to drive a car.

'DARKIE DAVIS: A big time S.P. Bookie. Confident - well dressed. Calm and strong personality. Probably of Italian extraction.

'ROY MARSHALL: Aged about 40-50. Well dressed, successful Melbourne punter and crook. Lennie's boss. He has knocked around and knows what two and two make. Has to drive a car.

'URGER O'BRIEN: About 50-60. A shabbily dressed alcoholic who makes a buck doing small jobs for Darkie Davis, and by keeping his ears open. A rather harmless soul.

'MORRIE: About 60. Joe Simpson's stable hand. Has an easy come easy go nature.

'BARMAN Barman of Matlock pub. Established.

'1ST TROTTING DRIVER: About 40. An experienced driver.

'RACING COMMENTATOR: Male.

'TROTTING DRIVER: Extra.

'BAR EXTRAS (3)'.

Note: The apostrophes in the possessive nouns in this list have been added in pen, not typed.

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1973
100
form y separately published work icon Bedlam Everett de Roche , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1973 Z1916162 1973 single work film/TV crime

The script for this episode held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'BILLY WYATT. (30's) Petty crim who gets involved with York - not realising he's a policeman.

'WALLY STRUTHERS: (20's) Nervous, over-weight, somewhat unattractive man who apparently doesn't get on well with girls. Must drive.

'CHARLIE BANKS: (20's) Wally's friend, who has takened [sic] it upon himself to end Wally's virginity by setting him up with Cathy.

'CATHY GALLEGAR: (18) Sweet, pretty, but fairly naive. Lives on a farm with her father.

'DEACON GALLEGAR (50's) Cathy's father. Fairly conservative farmer-type, but he can't hold his grog. When he drinks, there are some pretty comical results.

'TOM: Party member. Lines.

'MECHANIC: Works at local garage. One scene.

'PUBLICAN: At Matlock Hotel. Established.

'3 EXTRAS: Pub Scene.

'MANAGER: Of supermarket. Small part.

'EXTRAS: One man, two women - party scenes.

'STUNT WOMAN:

'STUNT MAN - TRACTOR DRIVER'.

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1973
121
form y separately published work icon Squaring Off Peter A. Kinloch , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1973 Z1915915 1973 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'HUGH ROBINSON (ROBBO): Mid-thirties, professional safecracker, born and bred in Matlock but moved to Sydney after a couple of close brushes with the law. A likeable easy-going rogue with a touch of the blarney.

'BABS TAYLOR: About 40. Robbo's elder sister. Forthright and honest she lives in hope of reforming her brother and looks after his daughter Lisa. (Robbo's marriage broke up a few years previously, for reasons which should become obvious). A rugged, no-nonsense personality with a soft spot for Robbo.

'EARL TAYLOR: About 40. Earl married Babs about five years ago under the false impression that he could induce her to sell the property and thus live off the proceeds. Basically lazy, he has a patent aversion to farm life and suffers periodically from hay fever. (Must Drive)

'FRANK NASH / WES PARKER: Late thirties, early forties. Two heavies working out of Sydney. Tough, ruthless professionals with a score to settle. (One of them must drive)

'LISA ROBINSON: Robbo's fourteen year old daughter. Idolises her father but aware of his short comings [sic]: loves horses. She proves a major stumbling block in her father's plans to escape. (Does not have to ride)

'KEITH HARDING: Fifties. Manager of the Matlock Dairymen's co-op.

'TRUCK DRIVER: Thirties. Small part.

'JIMMY MULLIGAN/CHICKA DEMPSEY: Forties. Drunken pub brawlers.

'DRIVER AT ROADBLOCK: No lines.'


A character has been deleted from the character notes: 'HEATHER GREEN: Twenties. Receptionist at the Regal Motel'.

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1973
123
form y separately published work icon Ski-do Patrick Edgeworth , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1973 Z1929057 1973 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'MARK WALKER. Late twenties. Smooth, tough, cool. Very fond of his sister who's [sic] death he wishes to avenge.

'PETER YOUNG. Late twenties. Handsome Ski Instructor. Likeable personality. Complete libertine.

'CAROL GREEN. Twenties. Attractive. Good figure. The pleasures of becoming the boss's wife have faded. She looks for excitement outside the marriage bed - and finds it.

'CHARLES GREEN. Fifties or older. Austrian - now resident in Australia. He's very jealous of his young wife. We shall come to sympathise with him.

'LILIAN DAVIS. Late thirties. Well dressed, well kept - and well off. She can indulge her fancies. As she gets older - the men get younger.

'TED SCOTT. Mid thirties. General factotum around the Lodge. Friends with everyone. Eager to please.

'RECEPTIONIST. Twenties. Attractive. Personable.

'MANAGER. 50's. Genial - helpful. Could be Continental.

'BOBBY. No lines, but direction needed.

'YOUNG MAN. Extra.

'MARK'S GIRL. No lines, but direction needed.

'YOUNG GIRL. Extra.

'GUNTHER STRAUSS. Part to be played by actual Ski Instructor/Stuntman.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1973
142
form y separately published work icon Poppy and the Closet Junkie Everett de Roche , 1973 Z1916173 1973 single work film/TV crime

The script for this episode held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'POPPY REID. (20's) Attractive private nurse and wife of Benje.

'LUKE REID. (Mid 30's) Benje's older brother, crippled in a car accident and confined to a wheelchair. Ruggedly good looking and well-built.

'BENJE REID. (Late 20's) Luke's younger brother and Poppy's husband. A weak character, who has allowed himself to be dominated by Luke.

'MRS. WHITE. Wife of alleged murder victim, and friend of Kennedy's.

'MR. WHITE. Friend of Kennedy's, same age. Dies mysteriously.

'DOCTOR COX. Alcholic, but intelligent and discreet. About 60

'FIELDS. Luke's boss. Small part.

'LAURA.Luke's dead wife. Flashbacks only.

'POLICE PHOTOGRAPHER. One scene. No lines. Flashbacks only.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1974
144
form y separately published work icon Two to One Against Patrick Edgeworth , 1973 Z1929069 1973 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'PETE EDWARDS: Early thirties. Attractive to women. Well educated. Enjoys the money his work brings him. Whilst constantly bantering with Terry, they still, basically get on well. [sic] Likes the birds and the booze.

'TERRY EDWARDS: Early thirties. Similar to Pete in many ways. They have known each other all their lives and can almost read each other's mind. His weakness is gambling. Whilst they have a close relationship there is nothing camp about these two. Both very hetero. They trade wisecracks without a smile. Must drive.

'STANLEY REYNOLDS: Fifties. Apparently well to do businessman. Married late in life after spending his formative years making money, not too ethically. Latterly he has squandered thousands on gambling. He is a cold, calculating man and quite well preserved for his age. Must drive.

'MADELEINE REYNOLDS: Late twenties. Marrying Stanley gave her the financial stability, her [sic] background had fitted her for. A gentle, attractive pleasing personality, she loves her husband dearly. She has no knowledge of his business methods and gambling losses.

'BOBBY GREEN: Gold plated bitch.

'VINCENT GREEN: Her pompous, rich husband.

'RECEPTIONIST: Early twenties. Attractive.

'DRUNK: Fifties. Rough appearance. Lines.

'CROUPIER: 30 - 40. Smooth, slick. Only calls bets. Lines.

'MAN AND WOMAN: (A passionate illicit relationship. Early 30's) Lines.

'ATTRACTIVE GIRL: Early twenties.

'3 GAMBLING EXTRAS: Well to do people. 40 - 50's.

'2 HOTEL EXTRAS: Any age. No lines.

'BARMAN: No lines.

'DOG: Must bark and growl to order.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1974
145
form y separately published work icon They'll Fix You Up, No Worries Sonia Borg , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1974 Z1914033 1974 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection includes the following character notes:

'BEVERLY JONES. Late forties. An ex-nurse. Hard, disillusioned. Drives.

'SID WALKER. A few years younger. Her de facto husband. Unscrupulous. He is afraid of physical violence, but brave as long as he is faced with someone weaker than himself. Drives.

'KIRSTY ANDERSON. 16 years old. Still goes to school: the Convent. She has fallen for Cliff because he in handsome, and because she is old enough now to be in love. The events of the story make her grow up.

'CLIFF WELLS. Mid-twenties. Good looking. Thought Kirsty a sweet kid, nice to have a good time with. He sees abortion as the obvious answer to an unwanted pregnancy. Drives.

'AILEEN MILLER. Late twenties or early thirties. Unhappily married. Did not want another child because her husband drinks heavily and then becomes violent towards her and her son. Drives a car.

'DOUG MILLER. Mid-thirties. Filled with resentment towards his wife and child because he thinks they have forced him to abandon a colourful career. He drinks.

'TOMMY MILLER: Seven year old boy. Should be small for his age. He has the air of a grown-up like many children who live in constant fear.

'DR. KAREN BROWN A doctor at the Matlock hospital. She believes in abortion-law reform; she is slightly defiant towards Maddern, though she considers him to be more human than most police.

'NATALIE. Hairdresser who arranges abortions.

'MRS. CARTINI. A middle-aged migrant woman. Completely out of her depth: she does not speak English well, knows only one thing: it is a sin to have an abortion. Yet she is willing to commit it because she can't face having another child.

'O'NEIL. A log-contractor. Likeable, helpful. (Strong build, outdoor type essential).'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1974
149
form y separately published work icon Pot Luck Robert Bruce , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1974 Z1932418 1974 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection includes the following character notes:

'GEORGE KELLY Aged twenty-eight years. Solid, brawny, no-nonsense farming type. George exhibits a moral dichotomy in that he would regard the commission of most crime; theft, fraud, etc. as contemptible and detection disgraceful. On the other hand he would cheerfully evade taxes, smuggle or, as in this instance, grow and sell marijuana. With George, crime is a matter of opinion. He is inextricably bound to the mate-ship syndrome and exhibits deep loyalty to family and friends.

'CAROL KELLY George's sister. Aged eighteen she also has strong loyalty ties to those around her. She yearns, however for [sic] escape from the boredom of her life. She reacts against the constant seperation [sic] from Graham Campbell, George's old army mate and, with whom she has an "understanding". Her requirement for recognition and approval from her teen-age Matlock contemporaries leads her to unthinking actions harmful to those she most loves.

'GRAHAM CAMPBELL An ex-army friend of George Kelly and from this association, Carol Kelly's fiance. Also aged twenty-eight years, he is a smoother article than George. His habitat is the city. He is handsome, plausible and from inclination and army training, competently tough. He is persuasive and would exert considerable influence over George.

'CYRIL HAYES Pompous, portly, affectedly articulate. A managerial type criminal whose ceremonial foppishness is a facade through which, [sic] occasionally is glimpsed a steeliness of purpose and an underlying violence.

'ALEX BELL Middle-aged but hard and taciturn. A gangster competent in the arts of brutal persuasion. The enforcer and working foreman in Hayes' drug business.

'COLIN KING A twenty-five year old [sic] Senior Constable attached to the drug squad and working undercover. His usual role is an "easy rider" type bikie. He dresses appropriately.

'MRS. WHITE Middle-aged, plump. The mother type.

'JACK WHITE Middle-aged, skinny; a worker.

'YOUTH Type. Lines.

'TEEN-AGE GIRL Type

'MOTORIST Type

'MOTORIST'S WIFE Type

'TRUCK DRIVER Type

'ANNOUNCER V.O. Lines.

'SHIRL V.O. Lines.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1974
154
form y separately published work icon What Are Friends For George T. Miller , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1974 Z1932441 1974 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection includes the following character notes:

'CHARLIE WILSON: 50's. Farmer and a close personal friend of Kennedy's. They have known each other since the war. (They both saw action at Tobruk) Wilson is a widower, his wife died not long after their son was drowned in a quarry on their property. Wilson has always held himself responsible for his son's death and the prospect of the quarry being opened up again, has engendered a crisis he is unable to cope with. He is morally a well adjusted, respected member of the community, and his actions towards Hughes in the early part of the story come as a surprise to all who know him.

'A quiet almost introspective person; there should be no hint of malice in his personality. What he does, he is driven to do, by the guilt he feels concerning the death of his son.

'HUGHES: About 30 to 35. He works for the Egil Oil Company and is in charge of draining the quarry on Wilson's land. He is physically tough but would never resort to violence, when he is faced with a difficult situation would use shadey [sic] legal methods to "Solve" [sic] the problem. He is amoral in his dealings with people and is therefore thoroughly dislikeable. (Should drive).

'NELL KENNEDY: Stock character.

'JAMIE WILSON: Wilson's son aged about seven or eight when he died. (one [sic] flashback film scene, no dialogue)

'ELSE WILSON: Charlie's wife also shown in two flashback scenes. (few lines). [sic]

'CONSTABLE A: Few lines.

'CONSTABLE B: Few lines.

'CONSTABLE C: No lines. Must be able to perform a fall down an embankment. Suggests casting a stuntman/actor for this role.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1974
157A
form y separately published work icon Dancing Class Vern Perry , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1974 Z1932453 1974 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection includes the following character notes:

'GRAHAM COTTON: Late 20's. Rich, arrogant, rude, is forced into violence. Must drive.

'SUE PALMER: Mid 20's, attractive. Well-bred, involved in white-slaving with Cotton. Was blackmailed into it. Must drive.

'ALAN CHOU: Taiwanese. Mid 30's. Runs white slave business. Ruthless. Must drive.

'JENNY PERKINS: 14. White-slaving victim. Thinks she is just being taught to dance.

'LESTER: Sue's fiancee. 20's. Solid citizen. Bit fiery. Must drive.

'MR. PERKINS: Jenny's father. 50'ish. Puritanical, doesn't understand his daughter.

'PATTI: Young hippie girl.

'STAN: Shopkeeper. About 40. One scene.

'CONSTABLE: Few lines, one scene. Must drive.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1974
167
form y separately published work icon Deep Water C.F. Barnes , Jim Stapleton , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1974 Z1912690 1974 single work film/TV crime

Two copies of this script exist, one original and one modified; the modifications allowed the production to take advantage of actual flooding at Echuca. One script is written by Jim Stapleton and one by C.F. Barnes. Certain aspects of the scripts, including the character notes, demonstrate that Stapleton's was the original script and Barnes's the modified version (and therefore the version that was ultimately produced).

The alterations to the script between Stapleton and Barnes's versions (see publication details for more information) include alterations to the character lists.

The character notes appended to Stapleton's script reads as follows (omitting the regular characters):

'COOPER: Late 20's. Clean cut, model prisoner. claim's framed. [sic]

'EVANS: 45 - 50. Outdoor type, lawyer.

'CHRIS EVANS: 19 - 20. Wholesome young lass. Likes outdoor sports. Kind.

'MRS EVANS: 45ish. Wife of above, average above middle class wife. Smart dresser.

'HARRY PARKER: 50ish. - Boat and canoe hire business owner, sympathetic type, knows the bush.

'MRS. PARKER: 45ish. Homely, kind type.

'MICHAEL PARKER: 17ish. Nice young lad.

'BRIAN MURPHY: 26ish, good worker, knows farming.

'KATHY: 24ish. Wife of above, quite pretty, good house wife. Pleasant nature.

'CONSTABLE JACK:'

The character notes appended to Barnes's script reads as follows (omitting the regular characters):

'COOPER: Late 20's. Clean cut, model prisoner. Claim's framed. [sic]

'EVANS. 45-30 [sic] Outdoor type. Farmer.

'CHRIS EVANS: 19 - 20 Wholesome young lass. Likes outdoor sports. Kind.

'MRS EVANS: 45ish. Wife of Evans.

'HARRY PARKER: 50ish. Boat and canoe hire business owner, sympathetic type, knows the bush.

'MICHAEL PARKER: 17ish. Nice young lad.

'BRIAN MURPHY: 26ish. Good worker, knows farming.

'KATH MURPHY: 24ish. Wife of above, quite pretty, good housewife. Pleasant nature.

'CONSTABLE REED. Few lines.

'YOUNG COUPLE. No dialogue.

'CONSTABLES (2) Few lines for one of them.

'EXTRA: Bedraggled flood victim, with birdcage (empty)

'ANNOUNCER. V.O. (RADIO BROADCAST.'

When taken in conjunction with the cast list and modifications to the casting call sheets (noted below), these character notes further indicate that it was Barnes's script that was produced, not Stapleton's.

The notes to the manuscripts (under publication details) contain more details on authorship.

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1974
168
form y separately published work icon In the Name of the Queen Simon Wincer , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1974 Z1932379 1974 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection includes the following character notes:

'DAVID PARKES: The Great Bullion Robber. Mid 30's to 40's. English. A quiet, solid character whose appearance and manner bear no resemblance to the Scarlet Pimpernel figure who everybody imagines the great robber to be. He's set up in Matlock living with Susan on a small run down farm which they hope to build up. David is devoted to Susan and has purposely avoided marrying her because he knows that it's more than likely one day that he will have to move on. Thru' Susan he has met Gary Hogan. Because of the common interest they share in bike riding, a warm relationship has developed. In many ways David is like Hogan in that everyone who meets him likes him but he is happier leading the quiet life (for obvious reasons) and apart from helping Sue and Hogan out with the kids' bike rides, rarely gets further than helping fix a fence on a neighbouring farm.

'SUE MIDDLETON: About 25ish. Sue is the daughter of a wealthy district grazier who has turned her back on "la dolca vita" to go and live with David Parkes. She is totally devoted to him (as he is to her) and yet has no idea of his famous past. Only when she finds out about David does she stop and question her happy existence and realise how much he has given to her formally shallow life.

'JACK MIDDLETON: Sue's father, a wealthy Matlock Grazier who has given Sue everything he could - a good education, the obligatory overseas trip, skiing holidays, etc. He can't understand Sue throwing all this away to go and live with David Parkes. Jack is very much of the old school in that he feels that people shouldn't live together unless they are married. Jack's wife has been bed-ridden for 2 years and he feels that Sue's actions haven't helped matters, despite this Jack can't help liking David in a funny sort of way - at least he works hard and hasn't got long hair. However there will always be a deep rooted resentment to any man who won't assume the responsibilities of marriage. Typical of his breed, Jack is the first one to turn against David when he finds out who he is.

'TOMMY HAYES: About 40. The head of Scotland Yard's flying Squad [sic]. A bachelor, he has devoted ten years of his life to tracking down and apprehending the nine Gold Bullion Robbers. Although he's never met Parkes he knows him almost intimately through his study of the man and his life. Hayes is determined, confident and an excellent policeman though at times he is a little bewildered by the Australian country and the way its police work.

'BRUCE ROSS-SMITH: About 30. Another member of the Scotland Yard Flying Squad. A typical ex-public school boy who tends to upset Maddern and York with his seemingly condescending attitude and plum in mouth talk. In fact it's just his upper class mannerisms which no Australian can quite cope with. A clever policeman who is also amazed by the Australian bush.

'DROVER: Typical of his breed. One line. Should ride.

'PILOT: Actual, hopefully we will use Ansetts Helicopter as in a previous episode of Matlock.

'2 UNIFORMED CONSTABLES: No dialogue.

'2 CIVILIAN BUSHWALKERS: No dialogue.

'EXTRAS: As many as we can afford for the final scene outside Police Station.

'MIKE: Young boy at trail bike track - couple of lines.

'BOY: Also a trail bike track - one line.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1974
178
form y separately published work icon The Overlanders Peter A. Kinloch , 1974 Z1915907 1974 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'AMBROSE CARTER (AMPS): Late thirties, forties. Self-styled producer of round-Australia documentaries. A poor man's version of the "Wheels Across A Wilderness" syndrome, sticking mostly to the pubs and racetracks of the larger coastal cities in his epic coverage of the outback.

'WILLIE BENNETT: Late thirties, forties. Amp's off-sider. Disillusioned sound recordist slowly being inveigled into a life of crime to compensate for the undisciplined excesses of his producer.

'BERNIE SMITH: Forties. Unsuccessful armed hold-up merchant. Former Matlock Resident. [sic]

'ROLLO MURPHY: Forties. Former Melbourne wrestling identity, rapidly going to seed. Bernie's off-sider.

'VINNIE MacREEDY: Forties. Free-lance crim from Melbourne, specialising in armed hold-ups.

'BELLE ANDREWS: Forties. Bernie's de facto wife. Desperately wants to see her man pull off the big one, but really doesn't hold out much hope after years of bitter experience.

'HARVEY PHIPPS: Fifties. Runs the Matlock Produce Store. Crafty old bastard.

'STANISLAUS KOZINSKY: Fifties. Heavily-built, heavily accented chicken farmer.

'OSCAR KOZINSKY: Late twenties. Stan's son. Also heavily built.

'ZORA KOZINSKY: Fifties. Stan's wife. Also heavily accented.

'TONY ANGELLINI: Semi-regular. moved [sic] back into Matlock after a brief stay in the smoke and is now in the process of refitting and renovating his service station and diner.

'FRANK MERRICK: Fifties. Manager of the Allied Woollen Mills in Matlock.

'OFFICE GIRL: Twenties, thirties. Merrick's secretary.

'EXTRAS: Hotel Scenes.

'BARMAN (ALF): Established character.

'MOTORIST: Scene 5, no dialogue.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1975
181
form y separately published work icon The Burribri Bunyip Vince Moran , 1974 Z1918130 1974 single work film/TV crime

The script for this episode held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'INGRID SHCNEIDER [sic]: Ingrid is a "loner". In her early 20's She [sic] has come to terms with her self-imposed isolation. In the presence of those she does not know well she withdraws completely-except in the case of Andy. With him, because of his reticence, she has an immediate affinity.

'MR SCHNIEDER: Ingrid's father. He also has condemned himself to a life of loneliness but unlike his daughter he is not uneasy in the presence of others. He is a determined man and would never shirk a responsibility or dodge a fight. His accent is only very slight and his exactness in speech is probably the most obvious clue to his German background.

'ROY MARTIN: About 40, a bit of a born loser. He has never made it as a farmer or anything else for that matter. His slovenliness is mirrored in the state of his farm, his equipment, even in his philosophy of life and outlook.

'MURRAY SLATER: A farmer, about Martin's age, who has managed to make a go of things. He likes to take things easy and enjoys nothing more than a day (or night) out with the boys.

'Car driving required.

'COL TURNER: A little older than Martin and Slater. He likes to crack a joke. He has a generous mid section that laughs with him at his own and others' quips.

'VERN HORTON: A farmer like his mates. He is the quiet one of the group. He sees the world through slightly more serious eyes than his friends. he [sic] is the oldest of the hunters.

'ANDY: Old, wiry and tough. He has a beard. His only real mate is his dog. It is not that the world has rejected him, he got in first and rejected it. He is not usually given to talking but does open up a bit to a kindred soul like Ingrid.

'NELL KENNEDY: Established character.

'RENE MARTIN: She has lived with her husband, Roy, long enough to have grown into his slovenly ways. She dressed untidily (as much through economic necessity as through choice.) and probably has a bit of a weight problem.

'EDGAR: The town drunk. An established character.

'DELIVERY MAN: Like all country mail and delivery men, always late and always on the run.

'Car driving required.

'FARMER'S WIFE Probably old and excitable - she is only seen in silhouette.

'DOG'.



Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1975
186
form y separately published work icon Gary Tom Hegarty , 1974 Z1921827 1974 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection includes the following character notes:

'TRUDY: 18. Eight months pregnant when we meet. Has been through a fairly daunting, traumatic phase but has emerged determined to do things her own way. She has no time for the police, or the Social Welfare Department, or any other do-gooder. She is convinced, aggressively so, that the only person she can rely on is herself. A bright, abrasive personality -- with only a few areas of uncertainty. And a few of -outright [sic] panic.

'CLIFF: Early twenties. Serving five years for his part in an armed hold-up. A crim by default. Lacks education and drive. Low resistance. Easily conned into taking the easy way out. But never ends up on the winning side. Despite this, he still allows himself to hope ... though of late discouragement seems to intrude quicker and linger longer.

'MRS SHARP: Mid-forties. Trudy's nosy neighbour. A seeker of secondhand thrills.

'DELL: An average sort of bloke trying to earn a few quid out of the property he owns. Slightly effeminate.

'BILL McLEAN: 30 - 40. He works for the Prisoner's Aid Society. Doing his best to help Cliff locate his wife.

'TAXI DRIVER:

'STATION-MASTER:

'BUS DRIVER:

'TRUCKIE:

'FARMER:

'FENCING CONTRACTOR:

'WOMAN'.

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1975
198
form y separately published work icon Just a Friendly Blue Gwenda Marsh , 1974 Z1913887 1974 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection includes the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'MICK CONDON: 35 years old. Tall, dark, handsome, reckless Aerial Agriculturist. Matlock's most eligible bachelor. A local hero, he wins the Matlock Aero Club Cup every year. He is constantly at war with the Department of Transport, D.O.T., calls them the Department of Trouble. He always avoids prosecution for breaking flying rules, because all the witnesses were "IN THE TOILET" at the time. He is used to having his way at all times. A winner. Life is one continual competition and game to him.

'BOB TEMPLE: 35 years old. Nicknamed "SHIRL" because of his name and his blonde curly hair. A little bloke, he is Mick's best friend, partner and mechanic. He is the real worker of their Aerial Spraying Business. He follows Mick around like a little puppy, checking all is well and rolling out the red carpet when necessary. Mick "PROTECTS" Shirl like a brother and woe betide anyone who picks on his little mate.

'MONICA PEARSON: 30 years old. A tall, beautiful girl, her beauty is a great foil to Mick's good looks and he is well aware of the fact. She is his girlfriend and lover but refuses to marry him until he reforms some of his reckless ways.

'KEITH FORBES: 45 years old. A dairy farmer. He has a dry sense of humour, likes Mick Condon, and is "IN THE TOILET" when required.

'HARRY: Thirties. Loves a beer, a fight and a bird, in that order.

'SCONER: Thirties. Loves a beer, a fight and a bird, in that order also.

'BARNEY: Thirties. Loves a beer, a fight and a bird, in that order. These three went to school together, now work together. A team. Great minds think alike. No one could break up their mateship.

'PETER NELSON: Ten/Twelve years old. A lonely child and because of this he is an expert at making up games.

'MRS. NELSON: Thirties. A worried mother. Concerned for her child's welfare.

'FARMER#1: Forties. Dry. Always been on the right side of the law but is an expert at avoiding questions.

'FARMER#2: Forties. Similar type, but perhaps less of an expert at lying.

'TWO AMBULANCE ASSISTANTS:

'MILK TRUCK DRIVER:

'PILOTS: Actuals from the Police Aero Club and the Lilydale Aero Club.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1975
201
form y separately published work icon Run Rabbit Run Peter A. Kinloch , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1975 Z1915887 1975 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'BILLY DELANEY: Late thirties. Live-wire braggart, showman, bull-dust artist. Sometime stockman, sometime rodeo rider, rouseabout jack of all trades, master of none etc. Billy's a man with a past and somewhere in the last ten years of travelling he's lost his nerve - not just the nerve to climb the chute rails of small town rodeos, something more than that. Billy's lost faith in himself and whether he knows it or not he's running.

'JAMES MACREADIE: Late thirties. Big fish in a little pond. Macreadie has property running into thousands of acres. Local councillor committeeman, [sic] Rotarian and the rest of it. He's clawed his way from success to success and spent the last couple of years trying to whitewash it with respectability.

'MERV PIPER: Forties. Macreadie's manager and an old arch-enemy of Billy's. Tough, hard-bitten.

'CORA PIPER: Forties. Billy's sister-in-law. Hard-nosed and bitchy. Completely unsympathetic to Billy.

'BIRDIE WATTS: Late fifties. Ex-jockey, yardman. Remembers the Billy of old and is determined not to let him forget it.

'ED HARTLEY: Fifties. Elderly rodeo committee member. Rural background.

'HERB CURRIE: Forties. Local by-laws officer. Physically big. Herb had a small trucking business in Melbourne before selling out and moving to Matlock and the good life. The by-laws position suits him down to the ground, adding that touch of formal authority to an aggressive, bullying nature.

'C.F.A. OFFICER: Head of the local volunteer brigade.

'BAR EXTRAS:

'COMMITTEE MEMBERS'.

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1975
204
form y separately published work icon The Witch Sonia Borg , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1975 Z1913989 1975 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'MRS. FOLEY: In her mid-forties. She looks frail and worn and ordinary. She has had a hard life, and there is no relief in sight. The one thing that helps her overcome the drabness of her existence is her firm conviction that she has the gift of clairvoyance and telepathy. She feels 'selected' 'chosen'. She believes she loves her invalid daughter, but subconsciously she rejects her, and blames her for much of her own misery.

'SIMONE FOLEY: Twenty years old. Confined to a wheelchair. To some extent one could say she is a telepathist: she senses her mother's rejection. Cut off from all outside contact for years, and exposed to her mother's personality, she is on the verge of a mental breakdown.

'RAPLH DONALDSON: About sixty. Well-to-do beef farmer. At first sight he appears a jovial magnanimous bloke, always ready to lend a hand. Underneath it all he is intolerant and superstitious. Though he at first maintains Mrs. Foley has no supernatural powers, he actually believes she does possess them. He is afraid of appearing ridiculous.

'TONY WALLACE: Matlock Brigade captain.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1975
206
form y separately published work icon King Hit Robert Caswell , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1975 Z1920386 1975 single work film/TV crime

The script for this episode held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'MALCOLM NEWSON: Middle twenties. Tall. A young man with a dream. An English migrant who dislikes the person he was in London. Who sees himself as a strong outdoors man. Dresses in western style. Collects cowboy paperbacks. Affects a slow walk, a slow talk.

'ROLLAND: Middle sixties. Sheep station owner. Determined to be youthful and energetic. Drives himself and drinks like a younger man. Fears old age.

'BILLIE STREET: Twenty. Rolland's grand-daughter. Extremely "country-minded", but longs to live in the city. She feels no great affection or closeness for Rolland. Very healthy and attractive. A natural feminine guile, but insecure and anxious. A lonely person.

'NEIL TURNER: Twenties. A big bull of a man. Neil can eat more, lift more, work harder and longer than other men. A driving compensation for his overpowering, deep seated cowardice. In very thick with -

'TED SANDERS: Early thirties. A hard bitten, hard drinking man. Broken nose. Big knuckles. Tough wirey muscular arms. A definite sense of threat and dominance from him. He seems to have little time for anyone except Neil. And that includes himself.

'DAN PRESTON: Late twenties. Fair haired, fit country type who takes a simple view of most things. Easy going and doesn't care for trouble.

'KEN EWINS: Thirty. A tough man who has worked since he was twelve. Confident in his movements. A country shrewdness. Selfish. Always considers number one.

'STATION PORTER: Gnomish. Forty. Bored.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1975
228
form y separately published work icon The Curse of the Bangerang Prince Everett de Roche , 1975 Z1916211 1975 single work film/TV crime

The role of the Bangerang people in the environment of Matlock is built into the premise of the program. The Matlock Police show 'bible', held in the Crawford Collection, includes the following information under 'History':

'The first occupants of the country that is now Matlock and district were the people of the Bangerang tribe, a branch of the proud and warlike Murray race. Reminders of their thousands of years of occupation can be found in "canoe trees" in the river forest, "kitchen middens" or campfire sites along the river and round the lake, and in the several hundred half-caste Aboriginal people who still live in varying states of de-tribalized poverty in Matlock and its outskirts.'


The script for this episode held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'ALBY FORBES: (50s) "The Bangerang Prince". A quiet, somewhat mysterious aborigine [sic].

'EDGAR: (Established character).

'ALFRED NOBLE: (50s) A very distinguished Melbourne lawyer, believed missing, possibly murdered.

'GRANT: A somewhat sardonic Homicide detective, up from Melbourne to investigate Noble's disappearance.

'MILKINS: A comical farmer.

'CLERK (male): (18)

'SHIRL: (Established character)

'PUBLICAN-ALF: (Established character)

'MARK: Biology teacher, and expert on snakes.

'SMITH: Plumber.

'JUNKER: Drinker at pub.

'RATLAND: Drinker at pub.

'MRS. SLICK: Lives nextdoor [sic] to the police station. Non-speaking role.

'PRETTY GIRL: Non-speaking role.

'MOTORCYCLIST: One scene. Non-speaking role.

'MAN IN PARK:

'SOLO 4 VOICE OVER:

'DRINKERS EXTRA 2 ONLY.

'UNI. POLICE CONSTABLES EXTRAS - 2'.

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Network Ten , 1976

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First known date: 1971
    • Melbourne, Victoria,:
      c
      Australia,
      c
      :
      Crawford Productions ; Network Ten ,
      1971-1976 .
      person or book cover
      Matlock Police title sequence (screen cap)
      Extent: 229 x 60 min. episodesp.
      Description: Black and white; colour
      Note/s:
      • 1. Although the official episode running order indicates 228 episodes, one of these was numbered with the suffix A.
      • 2. Episodes 1-161 were filmed in black and white. Episodes 162-229 were filmed in colour.

Works about this Work

Police Fictions Dean Brandum , Andrew Nette , 2016 single work essay
— Appears in: Overland , Autumn no. 222 2016; (p. 94-101)
'The article discusses the historical background of homicide in television and film in Australia. Topics discussed include the Australian true-crime television program "Homicide," made by production firm Crawford Productions founded by siblings Dorothy and Hector Crawford, the participation of chief commissioner of police Alexander Duncan on producing the radio series "D24," by Crawford Productions which depicted the works of police in 1940s, and the television series "Matlock Police."' (Publication abstract)
y separately published work icon The Writer in Australian Television History : The Crawfords Archive Catriona Mills (lead researcher), St Lucia : AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource , 2013 6955003 2013 website bibliography

The project is a collection of AustLit records based on the content of the Crawford Collection at the AFI Research Collection (AFIRC) at RMIT. A subset of the AFIRC’s main collection, the Crawford Collection contains scripts and ancillary material relating to Australian radio and television production company Crawford Productions, from the radio serials of the 1940s and 1950s to the demolition of the Box Hill studios in 2006. The Writer in Australian Television History is a collection of records for 318 episodes of Crawfords’ radio dramas and television series, spanning the period from 1953 to 1977.

y separately published work icon The Writer in Australian Television History : The Crawfords Archive Catriona Mills (lead researcher), St Lucia : AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource , 2013 6955003 2013 website bibliography

The project is a collection of AustLit records based on the content of the Crawford Collection at the AFI Research Collection (AFIRC) at RMIT. A subset of the AFIRC’s main collection, the Crawford Collection contains scripts and ancillary material relating to Australian radio and television production company Crawford Productions, from the radio serials of the 1940s and 1950s to the demolition of the Box Hill studios in 2006. The Writer in Australian Television History is a collection of records for 318 episodes of Crawfords’ radio dramas and television series, spanning the period from 1953 to 1977.

Police Fictions Dean Brandum , Andrew Nette , 2016 single work essay
— Appears in: Overland , Autumn no. 222 2016; (p. 94-101)
'The article discusses the historical background of homicide in television and film in Australia. Topics discussed include the Australian true-crime television program "Homicide," made by production firm Crawford Productions founded by siblings Dorothy and Hector Crawford, the participation of chief commissioner of police Alexander Duncan on producing the radio series "D24," by Crawford Productions which depicted the works of police in 1940s, and the television series "Matlock Police."' (Publication abstract)
Settings:
  • Central Victoria, Victoria,
  • ca. 1970s
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