1887792807253676598.jpg
Image courtesy of publisher's website.
y The Best Australian Poems 2016 anthology   poetry  
Issue Details: First known date: 2016... 2016 The Best Australian Poems 2016
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'What and who makes good poetry? The Best Australian Poems anthology enters its sixteenth year with exciting young poet and critic Sarah Holland-Batt presenting her picks of this year’s standout work.' (Source: Publisher's website)

Contents

* Contents derived from the Melbourne, Victoria,: Black Inc. , 2016 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Introduction, Sarah Holland-Batt , 2016 single work essay
Patioi"At any moment", Martin Harrison , 2012 single work poetry
Black Winged Stiltsi"Two long, plaited, clouds of cotton-wool fog", Robert Adamson , 2016 single work poetry
In the Billy Sing Bagdad Bar-and-Grilli"I’d heard the director didn’t need an Asian to play him,", Adam Aitken , 2016 single work poetry
[Untitled]i"–this light exists –that dark", Jordie Albiston , 2016 single work poetry

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Black Inc. , 2016 .
      1887792807253676598.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 208p.
      Note/s:
      • Published: 7th November 2016
      ISBN: 9781863958875

Works about this Work

Unruly Energies : Two Surveys of Australian Poetry John Hawke , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , March no. 389 2017; (p. 43-45)
‘According to The Magic Pudding, Bunyip Bluegum’s erudition is established through his ability to ‘converse on a great variety of subjects, having read all the best Australian poets’, a questionable achievement in Norman Lindsay’s day. A glance through the Annals of Australian Literature reveals the paucity of quality Australian poetry volumes published through most of the twentieth century, with selection shaped by the tastes of powerfully controlling editors, especially Douglas Stewart. Even in 1966, Max Harris’s survey essay on ‘Conflicts in Australian Intellectual Life’ – in which he inveighs against the academic gatekeeping of critics such as A.D.  Hope, James McAuley, and Vincent Buckley in the post-‘Ern Malley’ era – notes the limited opportunities for publication by emerging ‘younger non-intellectual’ poets. This situation changed dramatically for the generation of poets who appeared in the 1970s, with generous subsidies and the emergence of a range of independent and commercial publishing opportunities for poetry volumes: poets of this generation – whilst splitting the spoils along the lines of painstakingly demarcated coteries – responded to this opportunity by producing oeuvres often staggeringly more voluminous than those of the poets who preceded them (Kenneth Slessor’s 100 Poems would these days barely constitute a single publication).’ (Introduction)
Unruly Energies : Two Surveys of Australian Poetry John Hawke , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , March no. 389 2017; (p. 43-45)
‘According to The Magic Pudding, Bunyip Bluegum’s erudition is established through his ability to ‘converse on a great variety of subjects, having read all the best Australian poets’, a questionable achievement in Norman Lindsay’s day. A glance through the Annals of Australian Literature reveals the paucity of quality Australian poetry volumes published through most of the twentieth century, with selection shaped by the tastes of powerfully controlling editors, especially Douglas Stewart. Even in 1966, Max Harris’s survey essay on ‘Conflicts in Australian Intellectual Life’ – in which he inveighs against the academic gatekeeping of critics such as A.D.  Hope, James McAuley, and Vincent Buckley in the post-‘Ern Malley’ era – notes the limited opportunities for publication by emerging ‘younger non-intellectual’ poets. This situation changed dramatically for the generation of poets who appeared in the 1970s, with generous subsidies and the emergence of a range of independent and commercial publishing opportunities for poetry volumes: poets of this generation – whilst splitting the spoils along the lines of painstakingly demarcated coteries – responded to this opportunity by producing oeuvres often staggeringly more voluminous than those of the poets who preceded them (Kenneth Slessor’s 100 Poems would these days barely constitute a single publication).’ (Introduction)
Last amended 13 Dec 2016 14:49:26
Subjects:
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X