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y separately published work icon Cordite Poetry Review periodical issue  
Alternative title: Ekphrastic
Issue Details: First known date: 2017... vol. 57 no. 1 1 March 2017 of Cordite est. 1997 Cordite Poetry Review
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'In ancient Greece ekphrasis was understood more broadly than in the contemporary world, indicating a complex genealogy for this term that encompasses so much fine poetry as well as many other forms of writing. For the ancients, the best ekphrastic poetry was prized because it presented an often dramatic picture in words, enabling the reader to ‘see’ and respond immediately to what was being described or evoked. Ekphrastic poetry provided a way of allowing readers or listeners to appreciate the imagistic and sometimes narrative content of poetry almost as if they might be looking at the object or objects being written about.' (Source : Editorial introduction)

Notes

  • Only literary material by Australian authors individually indexed. Other material in this issue includes:

    Pyroglyphs by Philip Gross

    William Cordova: Machu Picchu after Dark by Stephen Burt

    MRI by Katharine Coles

    Nosferatu’s Serenade by Dana Gioia

    The Rye by Fiona Sampson

    Naive Conviction by Mark Yakich

    The Hanged Man by Tony Barnstone

    Bouquet de fleurs au napperon brodé by Moira Egan

    Six Dances by Anne Boyer

    An Extra Oyster for the Doctors by Elizabeth Smither

    Pablo Picasso: Lithograph: David and Bathsheba by Tom Daley

    Closed Captioning for the Black Anima by Airea D Matthews and Ladan Osman

    The Photograph Snapped at the Mosque by Sholeh Wolpé

    Still Life with Lazarus at the Museum by Joel Long

    poems from Fortuna by Megan Kaminski

    Calling All Shadows by Charity Gingerich

    Autumnal Cannibalism by Kristin LaFollette

    Anatomy for the Blind by Andy Brown

    after infatuation—ross bleckner—oil on linen by Katie Prince

    Lament by Sam Keenan

Contents

* Contents derived from the 2017 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Ekphrastic Editorial: Poetry That Sees, Cassandra Atherton , Paul Hetherington , single work criticism
'In ancient Greece ekphrasis was understood more broadly than in the contemporary world, indicating a complex genealogy for this term that encompasses so much fine poetry as well as many other forms of writing. For the ancients, the best ekphrastic poetry was prized because it presented an often dramatic picture in words, enabling the reader to ‘see’ and respond immediately to what was being described or evoked. Ekphrastic poetry provided a way of allowing readers or listeners to appreciate the imagistic and sometimes narrative content of poetry almost as if they might be looking at the object or objects being written about.' (Introduction)
Is Contemporary Australian Poetry Contemporary Australian Poetry?, Corey Wakeling , single work criticism
'Contemporary Australian Poetry (CAP) – an anthology of Australian poetry at present, in other words – comes introduced as a ‘survey, and a critical review, of Australian poetry between 1990 and the present (2016)’. What kind of document to this significant time-period does CAP constitute, and what bearing does it have on the question of an Australian contemporary? Most importantly, how do we now read Australia differently? What new forms of reading has contemporary poetry inspired in this country?' (Introduction)
J S Harry’s ‘Tunnel Vision’, Vicious Sydney and The Car Story, David Brooks , single work criticism
'As I began this essay on J S Harry’s poem ‘Tunnel Vision’ several years ago (2006) the radio drive shows in Sydney were full of opinions, mainly angry, concerning a report that a male teacher, in an English class, encouraging students to find as many words in ‘Australia’ as they could, had led the way by showing them how it contains the word ‘slut’, and then, when asked what that meant – it must have been a young primary-school class – had told them that it was a word used to describe women. An hour later I was having lunch with a visiting academic from Jaipur and we spoke about the recent spate of attacks on Indian students in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane, and then of the appalling death of an aboriginal elder in the back of a prisoner transport van in Western Australia. No point in claiming that Australia is not a racist country. I did, sometimes, try to claim that, but gave it up long ago. We mask it, that’s all: here on the East Coast we keep much of it beyond the Great Dividing Range, where a lot of other things are kept, out of sight and mind. We then, this Indian academic and I, spoke about Australia’s much-vaunted multiculturalism, its naivety, its need to mature, the stages it has gone through. There is a gap between Australia’s ideas of itself and its reality. A chasm. (Introduction)
Ekphrasis as ‘Event’ : Poets Paint Words and the ‘Performance’ of Ekphrasis in Australia, Dominic Symes , single work criticism
'To commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Newcastle Region Art Gallery (NRAG) in 2007, Lisa Slade and Peter Minter co-curated the exhibition Poets Paint Words. The two curators commissioned some of Australia’s best poets to write poems in response to a selection of paintings held in the NRAG archive. Gallery director Nick Mitzevich was optimistic about the potential of a mixed-media celebration of the NRAG anniversary, saying, ‘This exhibition will attract audiences of all ages, art lovers will be turned on to poetry and likewise poetry lovers will become lovers of painting.’' (Introduction)
Interview with Sidney Nolan, Ella O'Keefe (editor), Hazel de Berg (interviewer), single work interview
'Hazel de Berg’s recordings take place in the homes or work spaces of the subjects rather than a recording studio. This allows something of these places into the recording whether birdsong, traffic or an r&b song playing in the background. In the recordings, de Berg remains enigmatic, the ghostly presence operating the machine.' (Introduction)
The Voyage Homei"What’s in the album but time’s", Jennifer Strauss , single work poetry
Raising Lazarus : After Sickerti"This is an old story:", Rose Lucas , single work poetry
Their Solesi"The soles of her feet when she", Marcelle Freiman , single work poetry
The Claphamsi"Lord and Lady Clapham are tired, and", Lucy Dougan , single work poetry
Amytis of Media : Her Telling of the Days of Nebuchadnezzar’s Exilei"White stars stud the indigo", Anne Elvey , single work poetry
Etruscan Love Songi"Give me your best archaic smile", Tracy Ryan , single work poetry
Morris Hirshfieldi"The largest manufacturer of boudoir", Carol Jenkins , single work poetry
Postscripti"I placed my hand against heart to quench the spark.", Libby Hart , single work poetry
Second Launchi"Now, even from this distance, you notice", Lachlan Brown , single work poetry
Cape Cod Quarteti"And seated on the step, eyes closed, he bends", Stephen Edgar , single work poetry
Rooftopsi"He is lying sprawled within one of the spaces", Alex Skovron , single work poetry
Winter, Fifth Avenue, New York (1893)i"How I might learn to know", Adam Aitken , single work poetry
Counterpointi"Now, for me, the cycle", Charlotte Clutterbuck , single work poetry
The Wabi-sabi Storage Jari"It’s large enough to lair an animal.", Susan Fealy , single work poetry
Blue Poles [Number 11, 1952]i"I’m lost in dense bush", Penelope Layland , single work poetry

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Last amended 27 Sep 2017 15:50:02
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