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Gerard Kennedy in the title sequence for Division 4 (screen cap)
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Division 4, which Don Storey notes in Classic Australian Television was 'the only drama series on Australian television to rival the popularity of Homicide', was created as a vehicle for Gerard Kennedy, who had risen to popularity playing the complicated enemy agent Kragg in spy-show Hunter, after Tony Ward's departure left Hunter's future in doubt.

According to Moran, in his Guide to Australian Television Series:

The series differed from Homicide in being more oriented to the situation and milieu of a suburban police station staffed by a mixture of plainclothes detectives and uniformed policemen. This kind of situation allowed Division 4 to concentrate on a range of crimes, from major ones such as murder to minor ones such as larceny.

Though set in the fictional Melbourne suburb of Yarra Central, 'Sets were constructed that were replicas of the actual St Kilda police station charge counter and CIB room, with an attention to detail that extended to having the same picture hanging on the wall', according to Storey.

Division 4 ended in 1976. Storey adds:

Division 4's axing was a dark day for Australian television, as within months the other two Crawford cop shows on rival networks, Matlock Police and Homicide, were also axed. It was widely believed, and still is, that the cancellation of the three programs was an attempt by the three commercial networks--acting in collusion--to wipe out Crawford Productions, and consequently cripple the local production industry.

Notes

  • The 1969 title sequence for Division 4 is available to view on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yqrPcRHVDlc (Sighted: 13/10/2011)

Includes

1
form y separately published work icon The Soldiers Ian Jones , Phil Freedman , 1968 Z1923054 1968 single work film/TV crime

The script for this episode held in the Crawford Collection includes neither episode synopsis nor character notes.

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969
2
form y separately published work icon Once a Cop ... Terry Stapleton , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1968 Z1912933 1968 single work film/TV crime

The script for this episode held in the Crawford Collection includes neither episode synopsis nor character notes.

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1968
3
form y separately published work icon The Big Spender Ian Jones , Phil Freedman , 1968 Z1923068 1968 single work film/TV crime

The script for this episode held in the Crawford Collection includes neither episode synopsis nor character notes.

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969
4
form y separately published work icon Night Out Howard Griffiths , 1968 Z1920097 1968 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):


'NARELLE A fluffy blonde in her early 20's, somewhat childish and none too bright. She works as a prostitute and there is more than a hint of a lesbian relationship with her "Friend", Patsy.

'PATSY One or two years older than Narelle - tall and dark with a dominant personality. She favours clothes with a masculine flavour - although not too overtly so. For example, slack suits but never collars or ties. A fairly tough spirit, she is the driving force in her criminal ventures with Narelle.

'BRUCE CLARKE Mid 40's. Prize-winning door-to-door salesman of encyclopedias. Bespectacled, fast-talking would-be man-about-town. He picks up Narelle and Patsy, is robbed by them, and is in terror of what his wife will say.

'ERNIE JACOBS Late 40's - a big man, moody, with an explosive temper. A fellow-salesman with Bruce. He has lost his wife to another man, visits her while in Melbourne and unsuccessfully tries to argue her back.

'DENNIS MASON Age 23-28. The youngest of the three salesmen who have a night out. Good-humoured, eager to please, sensible.

'BRENDA JACOBS Late 30's. Ernie's run away wife. Attractive in a domestic sort of way, she is six months pregnant at the time this story takes place. She has left Ernie because he could not give her the child she wanted. A sympathetic character.

'TOM BAKER The man with whom Brenda is living. Late 30's or early 40's, must be smaller than Ernie, must be able to drive a truck. He is in league with some tough criminals, and helps them to organize robberies from trucks. His eyesight is failing because of optic nerve trouble. Occasionally, especially in moments of stress, he presses his fingers to his eyes, suffering a headache.

'MIKE BURNS / STEVE BURNS Two professional criminals - late 20's, or early 30's. Steve must be driver [sic], both should look good in a fight.

'EDDY GRIGG Mid-50's - respectable-looking, bespectacled, business-suited customer who is robbed by Narelle and Patsy. Appears in Teaser only. Car-driver. Losing his hair.

'BILL FRANKLIN Mid 30's, Tom Baker's mate on the truck. Two scenes only. A little dialogue.

'TRUCKY Any age, able to drive a truck, two scenes in which he befriends Narelle and Patsy when they are hitching a lift. Good, friendly type.

'TAXI DRIVER Any age. Two lines in one scene only.

'POLICE DRIVER (CONSTABLE HALL) Drives the divvy van with Dwyer. 20-30. Two or three lines of dialogue only.

'KAUFMANN Any age. Slight German accent. Manager of strip club. Appears in several scenes. Eager to get on the right side of the law, while keeping his customers happy. Money is his life.

'ROSIE BURNS Mid-20's, the wife of Mike Burns - she runs the roadhouse which they own. A criminal's wife - tough but with a certain homely quality. Not brassy or flashy.

'BARLADY: A motherly figure to whom the three salesmen tell their troubles.

'MACGREGOR A drunk, around 50, with a Scottish accent. Fairly rough, a regular customer at the police station. Likeable withall.

'"BENNO" BENEK MacGregor's companion. New Australian drunk, with little English or dialogue. The straight man in MacGregor's knock-about turn. Likeable and comic.

'WAITRESS Works in Kaufmann's club, young, sexily built, sexless personality. One scene only.

'HOTEL WAITER About 40, serves Bruce Clarke with champagne in his room. Calls the police when Bruce is robbed and is contemptuous of Bruce's association with Narelle and Patsy.

'THE POLICE

'YOUNG CONSTABLE Early 20's, works at charge counter with Scotty MacLeod. Straight out of police cadet school and learning the job the hard way.'



Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969
5
form y separately published work icon The Sunday Mother Terry Stapleton , 1968 Z1914406 1968 single work film/TV crime

The script for this episode held in the Crawford Collection includes neither episode synopsis nor character notes.

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969
6
form y separately published work icon Not Valentine's Day Terry Stapleton , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969 Z1914426 1969 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'JEROME VALENTINE A proud, self-made man. Paternalistic, consciously "plain and ordinary", has carefully built a reputation for being the nicest man in Melbourne. On the other side of the coin, he has a mistress, controls several rackets and wouldn't hesitate to have someone killed. Drives a car.

'COLIN SWEENEY Attractive, intelligent man. Has done a prison term, but is not a standard criminal type in as much as he is educated, and witty - in a cynical type of way.

'ADRIENNE Extremely attractive. Has been around and has no illusions left. She performs as Valentine's mistress purely because of the money and the comfort. But her heart belongs to Sweeney.

'MARIA STEINER German extraction. Valentine's housekeeper. A rather downtrodden but determined woman with problems. Dour - life is a struggle to survive.

'MIKE WARDEN Hard, tough, professional crim. Valentine's front man who runs his nightclub, does his dirty work.

'ARTHUR VALENTINE Valentine's son. Normal, balanced, nice person. Has no idea regarding the darker side of his father's nature. Drives a car.

'HELEN VALENTINE Valentine's wife. Nothing is ever right. A rather bitter, unsatisfied person, given to self-pity and fault-finding.

'RALPH O'CONNOR A crim. Efficient in his way but not bright and has no sense of humour. He has an earnest quality which is because he has to concentrate very hard to understand things.

'DR. CLIVE MORRISON Personable young doctor who is out at a nightclub with a girl other than his wife.

'CATHY SCOTT Attractive. The girl who is out with Dr. Morrison.

'REVEREND McINNES Vigorous, appealing Cleric.

'JOAN Any age. Valentine's secretary.

'CAB DRIVER

'NURSE

'ELIZABETH Attractive girl, Arthur's wife.

'BERYL MITCHELL Maria's friend. Pleasant.'



Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969
7
form y separately published work icon It's A Great Day! Douglas Tainsh , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969 Z1923916 1969 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'THE FAMILY:

'"WILD MICK" O'CONNELL (SUGGEST: Owen Weingott) (45-55 years) Father of the notorious O'Connell family. A "wild Irishman". An ex-boxer of the West Melbourne Stadium days. Completely extrovert, Mick, with a few drinks in him, will do anything, fight anyone. A loveable character if he is your friend. He lives by his wits, petty larceny and punting on horses. He still retains an "Irish-ness" of speech. He bears an eyebrow scar and a bent nose. Mick has a good Irish sense of humour. Long police record for petty crimes.

'"MOTHER" O'CONNELL (45-55 years) Mick's wife. Fond of the drink. Irish. Hard, but sentimental. Runs the family. Used to own a brothel where three of her daughters worked. She lives Mick's life to the full.

'ELLEN O'CONNELL The youngest daughter of the O'Connells. Ellen is pretty, viviacious, full of drive and possesses a tremendous sense of fun. She lives by her quick wits and her pretty face. A good schemer, she is too liable to do things on a grand scale just for the hell of it.

'_____________

'JOHN KELLY (45-55 years) Irish, formerly a great friend of the O'Connells, suspected of having caused the arrest of one of their sons, he now finds himself in the miserable position of being hated by the whole family, and decides to drown his sorrows on St. Patrick's day [sic]. He owns a second-hand dealer's shop and house. Receives stolen goods at times.

'PAT DOOLAN (35-45 years) An Irish friend of the O'Connells. Owns a furniture van which he drives for a firm. A wag, very fond of the drink. Full of fun. Has a police record for larceny.

'_____________

'THE "STAND-OVER" MEN:

'VINCE MORGAN (35-45 years) A thoroughly evil man. A pitiless extortionist who has skipped N.S.W. bail. He is the brains behind the extortion racket in the Yarra Central district, carefully picking victims who, for their own reasons, cannot appeal for police protection.

'TOMMY SHAW (20-25 years) A brutal man, a boxer with a bad reputation. He used to know "Wild Mick" through their boxing interest but has sunk below Mick's rough-and-ready standards of morals. A "flashy" dresser.

'_____________

'THE VICTIMS:

'MAX TAYLOR (35-45 years) Owns a small electrical shop which he uses as a cover for the receiving of stolen goods. He keeps company with the two stand-over men, but is himself a victim of their system. A weak man, he is also a bully, sly and devious.

'EMMA TAYLOR (30-35 years) Max's wife. She despises him, and is aware that his dealings are not always honest. She is frightened of Max, but doesn't know how to break with him. A woman who should evoke sympathy.

'_____________

'OTHERS:

'MORRIE WHELAN Middle aged. Owner of the pub frequented by the O'Connells. Friendly to the police, he often supplies them with useful information if they come to him and ask for it.

'SHOPKEEPER A victim of the "stand-over" men.

'TONY CIRO Italian who has a shop next door and acts as a witness to the assault of the shopkeeper.

'HOUSEWIFE A working woman. European, possibly Dutch. Not much accent. Excitable.

'EXTRAS For pub scenes, a mini-van driver, people to claim stolen goods.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969
8
form y separately published work icon The Swinger David William Boutland , 1968 Z1915561 1968 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'JOHN NOBLE: Thirtyish. He hit the big-time as a pop singer a few years ago, made money with a splash but spent it just as fast. Then suddenly his popularity was over. And he couldn't accept that. He was a god, now he's expected to be just an ordinary bloke again - take a job at low wages, buy a house in the suburbs. So he won't admit he's finished. He drinks too much, is ready to steal money rather than work for it. But that's better than being a nobody, going nowhere. (Actor must be able to drive.)

'JENNY NOBLE: Noble's wife. Mid-twenties, a youthful, sensitive girl. She met John when his popularity was waning; now she's deeply in love with him, despite his faults. Just pregnant, she wants security for herself and the baby. Wants to live like any ordinary family. That's all she asks.

'BEN LIPSON: Fortyish. A criminal type, an experienced safe breaker who has previous convictions and has 'done time'. He is ready to sell out his mates when things get tough for him. But outwardly he's hard, tough looking. (Actor must be able to drive.)

'CONSTABLE RON HALL: Police constable established in earlier episodes. A humorist.

'TRUCKIE: Rough, burly, the kind of man who doesn't mind running drugs down from Sydney to make a bit on the side. Does his job, expects to get paid on delivery. (No actual driving scenes)

'JENNY'S SISTER: A doctor's wife; older, more sophisticated, more durable than Jenny. And protective towards her younger sister. (Actress must be able to drive.)

'TONY TODD: Mid-twenties. Smooth young man, ex-manager of a pop group - he was exploiting teenagers even when he was one himself. He's ambitious, and sees himself as a 'Mr. Big' in the world of drug trafficking. He runs a disco and sells drugs on the side, through his pushers.

'RICHARD RICE: Late twenties. 'Mod' - a musician who's been pushing drugs for Tony Todd. A bit soft physically, a 'mother's boy' but smooth and clever and sly too.

'WAITRESS (YOUNG GIRL): Eighteen or nineteen. Serves coffee at the disco. Has a habit of overhearing conversations and passing on interesting bits of information to Tony Todd. No dialogue.

'TEENAGE EXTRAS: Kids ranging from sixteen to twenties who are enjoying the music and the crowd at the disco.

'BERT GOLDING (CLUB MANAGER): Middle-aged. Smooth, plump impresario type. His business is making money from singers and groups. When they're washed up, he doesn't want to know them.

'DWYER'S GIRLFRIEND: A pretty, typical teenager who enjoys a good time. No dialogue.

'YOUNG COUPLE: Boy about eighteen, girl barely sixteen. 'Nice kids' caught courting in parked car by the police. Boy able to drive.

'OTHERS: Uniformed constable, and wood splitter (at fuel merchant's yard). Both actual.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969
9
form y separately published work icon The Puritan Phil Freedman , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969 Z1923489 1969 single work film/TV

The script for this episode held in the Crawford Collection includes neither episode synopsis nor character notes.

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969
10
form y separately published work icon Big Brother Howard Griffiths , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969 Z1920115 1969 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'CHRIS GRANGER. Age 28, but looks lined and older than his years after serving three years in prison. Tall with sunken cheeks, close cropped hair, his manner is one of quiet authority. He has been a cracksman, a top criminal tradesman, never a thug. After his release from gaol, he has made up his mind that he will never return there. He is quietly determined to go straight and ensure that his brother goes straight with him.

'BERNIE GRANGER. Younger brother of Chris, aged 18 or 19. He has always hero-worshipped Chris and wants to be a big-time criminal like him. But whereas Chris had a profession, that happened to be criminal, it is the criminality itself that appeals to Bernie. He is a rebel against society, against the police who put his brother away, and against the narrow-minded self-righteousness of his father. Bernie is volatile and voluble, good-looking, a flashy dresser, and with a devil-may-care demeanour that conceals his adolescent uncertainty.

'MR GRANGER. Age 55-60, father of Chris and Bernie whom he has raised since his wife died during Bernie's birth. A hard man, ex regular army, with strong ideas on morality but no generosity in his soul. The children have rebelled because he always treated them like a drill squad on the barrack sqaure.

'MARIE Age 24. Chris Granger's de facto. Looks like a good-time girl. Not bad sort but rather brainless.

'MRS CUNNINGHAM. Aged at least 70. She grew up in style on her father's property in Queensland, married young and lost her husband in World War I. Her fortunes have declined over the years, and in the last decade she has become progressively lonely and more poor. But she still tries desperately to keep up appearances and never forgets that she is a gracious lady. She is much to proud to expect or ask for charity.

'MULLENS Age 40-50. Owns a billiards saloon from which he directs the operations of various small-time criminals, wears a bow-tie and brylcreem, affects an elaborate style of speech.

'KROGER Villainous-looking thug. Virtually an extra.

'FINCH Typical crim. Early 40's. About four lines only.

'STEWART, HALL Criminals. No lines. Should be cast as extras to provide contrasting types.

'PASTRANI Italian butcher in Victoria Market. Aged 40-50. One good scene.

'PASSER-BY (MALE) One scene where he comes to Mrs. Cunningham's rescue after she has collapsed at the market. Decent, working-man type. Any age.

'GARAGE ATTENDANT Mid-30's. In one scene, in which Bernie drives away without paying for his petrol.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969
11
form y separately published work icon The Angry Man David William Boutland , Phil Freedman , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969 Z1915592 1969 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'WILLIAM HARRIS A widower who has never recovered from the death of his wife. Became neurotic after she died. Gave up work - declaring it was too much of a strain. Is probably trying to keep the past alive. Insists on retaining all the ageing furniture that he and his wife owned..even [sic] though there is not sufficient space in the smaller house he now occupies. He has become completely self-centred.. e.g. [sic] wants his daughter, Sheila, to devote her entire lift [sic] to his needs.

'He has a persecution complex - arising from his self-absorption. Hates Fred Jenkins - the man who tried to take his daughter away. When he tries to burn Jenkins' house down, he sees it as a right and proper act of punishment.

'SHEILA HARRIS Has a full sense of responsibility towards her father; but finds him too demanding, too much of a strain. When she is living with him, she has practically no life of her own. She is perpetually harrassed..worn..sees every day as a burden. [sic]

'Fred Jenkins is not really her type; but - understandably - she accepted his invitation to live with him. He was easy-going, amusing - a man without grievances... However, her father made such a fuss that she left Jenkins.. on [sic] the understanding that she would return after persuading her father to go into a home...

'FRED JENKINS Was not very serious about Sheila. To him it was just one more affair. Obtained a replacement almost as soon as she had gone.

'He is a natural con man. An Australian with not a great deal of education, but a flare for words and phrases. He is good-natured and humorous..likes [sic] the sound of his own quips, but doesn't laugh at them and rarely looks for applause.

'He is a man without malice - even when provoked. On the other hand, he has no depth of sympathy for anyone. The opening scene - where he makes fun of Harris - is an example of his indifference to people's feelings. Later he refuses to 'put Harris in' as the man who tried to burn his home; but even this reflects a somewhat irresponsible attitude; because, at this point, Harris must be classed as a danger to the public.

'RHONDA Takes over from Sheila - and is more typical of the type of woman Jenkins installs as 'temporary de facto'. She has a bright personality, sex appeal, but is not over-intelligent. Feels malice towards her predecessor - Sheila.

'JACK BEAUMONT A laconic type. Doesn't talk much. A natural foil for Jenkins. There is an easy affinity between them.

'GREG STOVER & BERT WALES Two tough young laborer types. They are bad youths; but good mates. Team well together. Wales is the brighter of the two and tends to be the leader.

'YOUTH An average young man. Normally quite unaggressive; but is exasperated when Harris accuses him of behaving like a lout.'


Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969
17
form y separately published work icon The Protest Phil Freedman , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969 Z1923606 1969 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'CHRIS GARDNER Youngish businessman - quite prosperous with a seemingly assured future. A pleasant personality, but nothing at all extraordinary about him. Just an average bloke of his particular type. His whole world is changed in the instant when he's involved in a fatal accident.

'KAY GARDNER The ideal wife for Chris Gardner (see above). Prior to the accident, she was a happy woman - living in complete security.

'JOHN DAVIS A solicitor with a lucrative practice - mainly concentrates on handling of real estate transactions and investments. In outlook, he is a conventional adherent of the establishment, but he is not fusty in manner. Can be unrestrained and volatile in arguments with his wife. A strong personality. Drives car.

'THERESA DAVIS Wife of John. Loves him, but is often angered by aspects of his conservatism. An activist - living in comfort, but drawn to people at the other end of the social scale. Most of the time, she is humourless - direct, saying whatever comes into her mind.

'CHARLES HAMMOND (50) A businessman - very moderate education. Has acquired a degree of "smoothness", but lapses sometimes. A competent hypocrite. Persecuted his wife until she left him. He has no conscience about this.

'RUTH HAMMOND (50) Charles Hammond's wife. A pathetic derelict. One scene.

'STELLA JOHNSON (In forties) A woman who has been brow-beaten and physically battered until she has no initiative whatever. Completely crushed.

[Note: The notes '(2 scenes)' has been struck out after this character note, and a note made in the margin that the character will appear in film scenes, and not just, as originally planned, in live scenes.]

'CLIFF JOHNSON (45 or so) A factory foreman. Strong. He is another of those characters who make a point of being pleasant to everyone but their wives. When he torments Stella, there is no gloating sadism. It is straight-out brutality.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969
19
form y separately published work icon Janie and Janie Douglas Tainsh , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969 Z1923949 1969 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'JANIE MITCHELL. 25-30 years. An emotional, intelligent and highly sensitive girl of more than average intelligence. An ex-University Student, now writing a novel. The break-up between her and Dave leads to a schitzophrenic mental state, a happy, romantic and highly imaginative girl and a potential phychopathic [sic] killer.

'DAVE GIBBS. 25-35 years. A failure at University, a man with good intentions, but, through character weakness, bad results. Has served a jail sentence in Western Australia, after a weak attempt at a hold-up. Has lived with Janie, is now engaged to Pam Harper.

'PAM HARPER. 25-30 years. Attractive-looking, rather empty-headed, but determined in a feminine way.

'MERLE. 40-50 years. A kind, simple soul. Lets rooms in down-at-heel boarding house, "Aloha". Used to living in semi-squalor.

'MRS COLLINS. 25-30 years. Normally a quiet woman, proud of her baby. But because of her loss, she is only just able to retain control of herself.

'DR. BIRRELL (Or actor to emulate him.)

'EXTRAS. Two women in Police Station required to weep. One man in street. No speech.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969
20
form y separately published work icon The Threat David William Boutland , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969 Z1915621 1969 single work film/TV crime

In the latter part of this script, flashbacks to the first episode (and, more particularly, the death of Banner’s wife and baby) are interspersed with this current episode.


The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'BETTY WALSH Thirty-ish, not intelligent, a confused girl, used by people like Walsh and Brown. Afraid of being alone, always aware of her childhood innocence and the sordidness that her life has become.

'JOHN BROWN Late twenties. A young thief, cowardly, always angry at others because of his own flawed character, of which he's well aware. Actor able to drive.

'LEN WALSH A savage. Cold, hard menacing. [sic] A threat of violence emanates from this man at all times. Forty-five years old, very strongly built, and far from stupid. Actor able to drive.

'EDDY FRITH A Boarding House Keeper. [sic] Forty-ish, sharp 'cheap' dresser. Not a bad bloke, fairly well built.

'GIRL & YOUNG MAN Late teens or early twenties.

'USED CAR SALESMAN A happy, honest middle-aged man.

'PEDESTRIAN Almost hit by police car.

'EXTRA P.C. Actor able to drive.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969
23
form y separately published work icon First Offender Ian Jones , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969 Z1923099 1969 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'ALBERT MORTON. Fiftyish, rather drab and sad, a man who has worked hard all his life without really getting anywhere, and who now sees his world crumbling.

'BRIAN SLADE Thirties, smart, intelligent, with-it. A young man who has seen a great future in a comparatively dull job and who, in his search for compensating excitement, has become associated with criminals. He cannot accept this role but finds himself too weak to break their hold.

'GIOVANNI STEFANO. Forties. A ruthless manipulator of people who has built a modest migrants' club into a major gambling and crime syndicate.

'HARKNESS. Manager of a credit company. Late forties, efficient, rather tense, humourless and unemotional. To him, human values can only be assessed in red and black.

'JENNY MORTON. An attractive and intelligent girl, early twenties.

'PAUL CAVANAGH. Twenties. Good-looking, slightly spoilt son of wealthy parents, who despite a playboy image, is genuinely fond of Jenny.

'MRS. MORTON. Fifties. Invalid wife of Bert Morton who tries to play down her illness and stay cheerful for the sake of her husband and daughter.

'LUCIANO VIRGONA. Thirties. Big, bouncerish.

'ANNA ZELLINI. Twenties. An attractive but haunting girl. Only a few lines, but must make a strong impression. Fundamentally decent, she has been bullied and conned into becoming a prostitute.

'SALLY HOWARD. Quite attractive. A bright, warm young girl who is Morton's only real friend at his office.

'DR. HOLMAN. A capable surgeon.

'SIR GEORGE WELLMAN. Fifties, distinguished. Brilliant neuro surgeon.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969
24
form y separately published work icon We'll Get Him One Day Phil Freedman , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969 Z1923620 1969 single work film/TV

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'LESLEY FISHER A unique figure among criminals .. a modern Squizzy Taylor.

'Short - 5'2" - thickset. Aged 40. Cunning and ambitious. He started as a very small-time crim., and worked his way to the position of gang-land boss. He is conceited and self-assured .. a cocky manner, but not noisy.

'A lot of his henchmen have served long sentences, but Fisher has only served a couple of short terms. He has a flair for organizing 'jobs' ... with attention to detail, and so, in the crim. world, he passes for a great 'brain'.

'His clothes are immaculate, and only a shade flash. Expensive suits ... razor sharp creases in trousers .. perfectly laundered shirt cuffs showing ... cuff links .. expensive tie pin .. a 'pre-shaped' handkerchief in breast pocket. Small, new-looking hat. Drives car.

'Genuinely loves his wife, Valerie. Completely devoted.

'VALERIE FISHER Attractive, pleasant, young woman with a good background. Has standards. Very much in love with Fisher, completely taken in by him. Would not believe anything bad about him.

'ERIC HUTCHINSON 34. Tall, strong, rugged type. A seasoned professional crim. who enjoys being on a job. Admires Fisher and is unquestioningly loyal. Despite his toughness, he has an easy-going outlook .. and a certain amount of charm. Must be able to drive fast and skilfully.

'TOM LANGLEY Aged 60. A veteran crim. with a long record of robbery and violence: Starting in the late 1920's when gangs were flourishing.

'At 60, he is still strong and active but troubled by a bad leg. On a job he is ruthless, unconcerned about his victims. At home with his grand-daughter, Julie Williams, he is just another human being.

'JULIE WILLIAMS 18-20. A nice girl, of working class background. Very fond of her grand-father, has always known of his criminal activities and just accepts it. Has a great respect for Fisher.

'GRAYSON Owner of a prosperous supermarket, has a precise mind and lives by schedules. He would attribute his success to this.

'A dreary man, but in the live scenes with Banner, he is seen as a decisive character who is not going to let a robbery and assault disturb the normal routine.

'JOAN CLEMENTS 25-30. A shop-lifter, who has had an affair with Fisher. Strong, attractive, with a coarse manner. Has an almost psychotic dread of going back to prison and this causes her to fight like a maniac when Banner and Peters arrest her.

'ELDERLY MAN Ex-blue collar worker, on pension or superannuation. Has become the complete spectator. Watches the brawl involving Joan Clements in much the same way as he would watch a quiet district cricket match.

'MRS. REYNOLDS Well-to-do, dignified, resents having a known criminal living in the house next door.

'CERNIK New Australian cafe proprietor. One scene only. No dialogue.

'DETECTIVES. One scene only. No dialogue.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969
26
form y separately published work icon It's a Man's Life Howard Griffiths , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969 Z1920143 1969 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'CONSTABLE DAVE SMYTH Early 20's, big, burly and tough-looking. He worked briefly on the wharves before joining the police force. As the story opens, he has just completed initial training and he is still full of enthusiasm and idealism for the job. He is soon in trouble because of his family background and his hot temper.

'WILL SMYTH Dave's father. A wharfie and militant unionist who believes his son has become "a lackey of the capitalist classes" by joining the police. Through his son's activities, he loses the friendship of his mates. But, when it comes to the crunch, blood proves thicker than mates or credos.

'ALF GALLAGHER Will Smyth's mate. An ageing wharfie who finds solace for his loneliness in drink and in reminding all and sundry of his great days when he worked as rigger building the Sydney Harbour Bridge - high up, earning big money. He has invented this past and now almost believes in it himself.

'JOHNNY HART Aged 30-35, a hard man with convictions for burglary. No friend of the police, and a cold man with more than a streak of cruelty. Car driver.

'PAT GALLAGHER Alf's son, aged 25-30. Not very bright and easily led astray by Johnny Hart.

'JOE SWITHIN Aged 40-50, bespectacled garage proprietor and fence. Very professional in both occupations. He dobs Johnny into the police to save money on a business transaction with Johnny.

'ANITA Young gold-digger who keeps Joe Swithin happy. Attractive in an obvious way.

'CAROL HENNESSEY Dwyer's fiancée. A nurse, good-natured but nobody's fool.

[Note: The accent in 'fiancee' has been added in black ink.]

'JANE WILTSHIRE About Carol's age, also a nurse, but with a rich father who gives her all she wants. She wants Constable Dave Smyth.

'TINY Aged 40-50, very tall wharfie. A decent bloke.

'BOB Wharfie - Tiny's mate.

'OLD MAN Aged 65-80. He witnessed a robbery and shivers in the cold.

'YOUNG MAN About Dave Smyth's age. Well-spoken, he sees a drunk in danger of falling from a high building and runs to Dave Smyth for help.

'MICK PETERS' GIRLFRIEND Decorative.

'BARMAN

'CUSTOMS OFFICER

'TWO WHARFIES

'ONE WHARFIE

'FORK LIFT DRIVER'.

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969
28
form y separately published work icon The Victim Tom Hegarty , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969 Z1921749 1969 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'HEATHER CHAPPLE. Twenty. A fairly average young girl, engaged to be married. Plans a 'white' wedding. She is brutally raped by an intruder in her flat. When the initial shock passes, she begins to worry about the court case, publicity, gossip. What people think about her is blown up in her mind. She is unable to accept her violated life and turns to her boyfriend for support.

'GEORGE FINCH. Thirties. A man who is pathetically unable to succeed at anything. From big plans and dreams he has been reduced over the years, to selling cheap plastic kitchenware door-to-door. His wife is now eight months' pregnant. Their landlord is trying to evict them. Desperate for money, he takes to housebreaking and petty thieving. He's not much good at this either. On one of his forays, he is surprised by Heather. And in the struggle that follows (this is the culmination of all his frustrations) he rapes her.

'ELLEN FINCH. About thirty. When she met George, he was young and promising and persuasive. He talked her into leaving university and marrying him. Her mother thought she was marrying beneath her class and was never impressed by George. Loyal to George but hugely pregnant and desperately worried about their financial position, Ellen wants them to go and live with her mother. Until the child is born, at least. Fairly resilient, she is unable to cope any longer.

'TED KAVANAGH. Twenty-five. A big outdoors worker, engaged to Heather. Not particularly intelligent or sensitive, he is shocked at first by the attack and tries to comfort Heather. But he doesn't really understand his own feelings. They begin to change after he is provoked into a fight by a workmate. He has second thoughts, decides that the situation is more complex than he imagined, but there's something in it for him.

'ERNIE JACOBS. Fifties. A solid man, hardened by years in the trade. He helps the police as much as he can.

'HOOPER. Senior uniformed constable.

'GEARY. 25-30. A workmate of Kavanagh's. Rough and tough, without compassion. His world revolves around beer and sex.

'PRENDERGAST. 40-50. Boss in charge of a construction site, he rings the police when he is unable to break-up a fight among his men.

'MRS BRYANT. A gossipy-type housewife, age unimportant. She considers herself above door-to-door salesmen.

'MRS NELSON. Thirties. A woman who lives in one of the other flats. She offers to help Heather, but her attitude is one of curiosity and revulsion mixed.

'PEARSON. A retired man in his sixties who still has a reasonable income. A bit deaf. One scene only.

'TOM WILKINS. Fingerprint man from Forensic.

'EXTRAS. Two or three women, construction workers - if possible.'

According to Don Storey, 'The Broadcasting Control Board ruled that this episode was not to be screened before 8:30 PM'.

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969
29
form y separately published work icon The Price David William Boutland , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969 Z1915663 1969 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'JACK PARSONS Forty-ish, a man of pathetic anger and anxiety. A private detective who hates his work, is under pressure because of medical expenses for a chronically asthmatic wife. Becomes involved with criminals. Actor able to drive.

'BETTY PARSONS Forty-ish. Parsons' asthmatic wife. She feels sorrow for what her husband has become, but conceals this from him. Realizes he is in some kind of trouble, but is afraid to find out what it is.

'RICKY PEEL Mid-thirties. A hard and vicious criminal who is basically a coward. The kind of man who beats his children and expects them to love him. Physically, a quite formidable type.

'SHIRLEY PEEL Mid-thirties. Under a hard veneer, she is a good mother. She loathes her husband completely, and fears him.

'RONNY RAYNOR Late twenties. A young crim., mate and admirer of Ricky Peel. Has been in plenty of trouble with the police before, and will probably finish up doing a long sentence for a vicious crime. Physically intimidating. Actor able to drive.

'JUNE ANDERSON About Frank Banner's age. Was quite a plain girl who has become beautiful by sophistication. She loved Banner and lost him to Joy. She has come back to show Banner how well she has got on without him, but finds herself falling in love all over again like a young girl.

'CONSTABLE HOOPER A lanky, idle, disgruntled first constable.

'MALE EMPLOYEE

'SAMMY JUDD Established in previous eps.

'RESTAURANT WAITER Expensive red-jacket type.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969
30
form y separately published work icon Farewell Little Chicago Ian Jones , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969 Z1923154 1969 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'STAN HOGAN Burly, small-time crim in late thirties. Thoroughly unattractive - bludger, bash-artist.

'ALICE TURNER Blonde, mid to late twenties. A prostitute who, potentially, is a decent person - devoted to her daughter. Ideally, attractive with a good figure.

'ELAIN MURRAY Early to mid thirties. A former prostitute who has graduated to the upper stratas. Attractive, well dressed and groomed but tough and emotionless.

'GORDON LEE Fortyish, vital, impressive. A successful businessman who is dabbling in local government. Totally ruthless and amoral. Highly plausible - speaks and acts with tremendous pace and attack.

'ANDREW PARKER Twenties - clean-cut young assistant to Lee - sees only one side of the man. Grave, gullible, dilligent.

'STELLA PALMER Twenties - bespectacled, no-nonsense physiotherapist who works in a brothel without knowing it.

'SEN. DET. REYNOLDS Quiet and authoritative.

'HARDY Another Senior

'WALKER Lee's solicitor. Forties. 2 or 3 scenes.

'DES GORDON Garage attendant who is an ex crim.

'MISS SINCLAIR The solicitor's secretary who looks after Alice Turner.

'FOSTER A detective of the Company Squad.

'CATHERINE Alice Turner's little girl, aged 10.

'NUN One telephone conversation.

'REPORTER One scene.

'FOUR YOUNG HOODS Some lines.

'TWO NICE SUBURBAN GIRLS

'HOUSEHOLDER Middle-aged (lines).

'TWO BANDITS Action only.

'DRIVER Action only.

'BANK TELLER Action only.

'P.A. VAN DRIVER

'SECRETARY IN CAMPAIGN OFFICE Couple of lines.

'WRITER IN CAMPAIGN OFFICE

'EXTRAS DETECTIVES TWO WORKMEN'.

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1969
46
form y separately published work icon Fizz Tom Hegarty , 1969 Z1921767 1969 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'HERB DOHERTY About thirty. A cheeky little crim who turns fizz because he has fallen for Policewoman Margaret Stewart. He claims he is a reformed character and needs Marg to keep him on the straight and narrow. He is Irish, has a quick inventive mind, can usually talk his way in and out of situations. Although he seems inoffensive and harmless, he causes more than his share of trouble. And despite a string of minor convictions in his past, he is likeable - with a charm all his own.

'PATRICK BENEDICT ANDERSON Forties. A hardened crim, (previous convictions for burglary, assault and robbery, armed hold-up, assault with a weapon) who has organised a smash-and-grab with two of his old cronies. The job they pull is well-planned and executed. The only flaw is Herb.

'ROBBINS Thirty-forty. He is the gunman in the team, employed to cover the others in a raid or take care of any unnecessary violence. Lives by the criminal code, sets out to avenge Anderson when he is taken by the police. Tough and without compassion. Blasts a man down with a shotgun in a second robbery.

'SMITH Forty-fifty. His trade is stealing and driving getaway cars. He does his job well, but is not over-bright. He joins Robbins in tracking down the man who betrayed Anderson - although he is not as involved or as vicious as Robbins.

'JUNIE MULLINS Late twenties, early thirties. She is a former prostitute who is living with Anderson. Attractive, well-groomed, but tough underneath. She likes the best of everything, which Anderson is able to supply - until he's caught. The crims use her place as a base.

'SAMMY JUDD Roy Lyons.

'DAWSON Sixties. Wears an old suit and tie, but this is a front. Has a shrewd mind and is an able fence.

'GOLDBERG Forty-fifty. (Possibly younger) A jeweller whose shop is raided by the smash-and-grab gang. Excited when we see him and aggressive with the police.

'JOSEPHS A butcher who sees the smash-and-grab from his shop and gives information to the police.

'DRIVE-IN BAR ATTENDANT Twenties. Held up by Smith and Robbins, gunned down by a shotgun blast.

'GIRL An attractive girl - around twenty - who ministers to Herb in the final scene.

'FINGERPRINT MAN Robert Schroeder.

'FIRST CONSTABLE SHEPHERD George Cunningham.

'EXTRAS Several pedestrians.

'EXTRAS A few drinkers.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1970
47
form y separately published work icon La Truffa Terry Stapleton , 1969 Z1914441 1969 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'JAMIE VICKERS. Aged 19, sensitive, likeable, 'going through a phase'. An art student at the Tech. Drives a car.

'TINA NARETTI. 25-26. An attractive Australian girl, married to an Italian. Also doing an Arts course, which is where she met Jamie. A certain sadness about her. She knows her affair with Jamie is ill-fated and can't last, but because of her unhappy marriage, she tries to enjoy it while it does.

'DOMINIC COMISPARI. 45ish. An irrepressible, effervescent, likeable Italian.

'LUCIA. 40-45, Dominic's wife. Large with a large heart.

'ALBERTO. 35-40. Rather simple but good-natured Italian.

'MR GINOTTO 25-35. Italian tram conductor. Likeable, co-operative.

'MR ROMBERG 50-60. Manages the small store next to Naretti's office. Helps Banner in his investigation. Rather precise, dignified person.

'MRS HARRIS. 60-70. A pensioner. Very lively, observant.

'JOHNSON. 30ish, Small time crim. Figures in a car chase and has brief scene with Dwyer. Unintelligent, rough. Should drive well.

'CONSTABLE GREY. 25-30. Has two scenes with Dwyer as his assistant in the Divvy van, which he drives. Half a dozen lines, no emotion.

'PETER NARETTI. Late thirties to forty. Italian. Arrogant, used to manipulating people, including his wife. Ruthless and competent.

'ELLEN VICKERS. Vickers' wife.

'BERGMAN. 45ish. A Private Enquiry Agent. Not a bad bloke, used to the sordid side of life (divorce evidence etc). Looks rather weary, but has a little warmth left.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1970
49
form y separately published work icon The Desecration Terry Stapleton , 1969 Z1912947 1969 single work film/TV crime

'Tony Brown is a likeable, somewhat unstable 29 year old. He works at an art suppliers. He paints a bit, but not very well, and in the absence of any other great talent, has taken this job where at least his knowledge is of some use. He is very shy, very introverted.

'One of his customers is Liz Chandler, a bright attractive 19 year old who buys oils and canvas etc. and gradually gets to know Tony. She senses that behind his shy reserve there are very worthwhile qualities, and she has the sort of bright confidence to draw them out.

'Tony falls heavily for her and she becomes the most important thing in his life.

'He is shattered when she announces her intention to enter a convent, become a nun. He pleads with her, but she has reached this decision after long and somewhat painful, consideration.

'She comes from a rather strict, extremely devout family who have never approved of Tony.

'After Tony hears the news about the convent he becomes extremely emotional, not helped by a drinking binge. In this state he visits Liz's parents, rails at her father who throws him out. Still disturbed, bitter and frustrated, he enters a church and vents his fury in a violent orgy of descration.

'Banner and Vickers inspect the damage and discuss the matter with the priest. They at first assume it to be the work of vandals who have recently been busy in the area.

'Tony, at work the next day, is approached by a woman who wants a couple of paintings framed. One of them is a religious painting. Tony hurls it away, raves briefly at the woman and rushes from the store. He is subsequently dismissed.

'The Mother Superior at the convent which Liz has entered, receives a phone call from Tony who wants to speak to Liz. He is refused permission. He becomes abusive, insists that Liz be released and threatens dire consequences to the convent if this does not occur.

'The Mother Superior reports the phone call to Vickers, who, in discussion with Banner, relates this event to the earlier desecration.

'They are granted permission to interview Liz, who reluctantly tells them about Tony.'

Source: Synopsis held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection (RMIT).


The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'TONY LANE 29, sensitibe [sic], unstable. A variety of reasons have conspired to make him bitterly anti-Catholic. He is asthmatic, complex, alternates between being sullen, belligerent, hysterical. Lead part. Drives car.

'FATHER CONRAD 40-50. A man's man. About as un-Priestly [sic] as you could get. Warm, compassionate, realistic, - endless care for his fellow man with affection and a sense of humour. After 2 minutes, you feel you've known him always. Not a huge part, but he dominates the final segment and the whole episode depends on this character being convincing.

'LIZ CHANDLER 19. Tony's girl friend who decides to become a nun. A healthy, warm creature, extremely out-going.

'MRS. LANE 50ish. Tony's mother. She wears Tony like a cross. Caring about him and fussing over him in all the wrong-ways., [sic] and then complaining because she is obliged to do so. A domineering type who has never tried to understand her son. When we see her, we understand Tony' s instability much better. Medium part.

'MOTHER AGNES 45-50. A strong "professional" nun. In charge of a convent and likeable, well-repsected, but very much used to being boss. Medium small part.

'MAX 25ish. Young man who works with Tony in the Art Supplies section of a store. Likeable, with a sense of humour.

'MR. CHANDLER 45-50. Liz's father. Rather dull, unimaginative person. Dislikes Tony and has little warmth.

'FATHER STEVENS 50-60. Priest whose church is desecrated by Tony. Pleasant, undistinguished, conventional.

'KAY Dwyer's girlfriend.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1970
51
form y separately published work icon The Unwanted Sonia Borg , 1969 Z1914143 1969 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection includes the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'LILLIAN GIBSON. 16 years old, highly strung. Has no contact with her parents and feels lost and unwanted. In an attempt to attract attention she maintains that she has been assaulted by a stranger, and inflicts injuries on herself to substantiate that claim.

'ROBERT GIBSON. About 45-50 years old. A successful businessman - has worked hard during his early career. Now wants to make the most of his life and indulges in something like a "Second Honeymoon" with his wife. Does not understand his daughter and her problems. A pompous, selfish, unimaginative man.

'JOYCE GIBSON. 40 years. A very ordinary woman - of average intelligence. Enjoys her husband's attention and her newly acquired riches. Squashes any pangs of guilt she might feel regarding her daughter. The actress must have courage to appear comical and unattractive at occasions.

'MARY CORBETT. 65 to 75 years old. A widow. Energetic, eccentric, stubborn. Refuses to budge from the footpath after eviction from her house.

'JOHNNY BARKER. About 18. Working-class. Must be able to drive a car. Has left home because he can't get on with his father. Quick tempered but likeable. Sense of humour. Helps Mary Corbett after her eviction.

'ED LANE. About 18. Working-class. More phlegmatic than Johnny - slower in thought and action. Becomes melancholic when drunk.

'MR WARD & MRS WARD. Upper middle class acquaintances of the Gibsons.

'SLATER. About 40 years old. A Peeping Tom. Fears that the police hold him responsible for something he didn't do and hides in an old building. A pathetic figure who should create considerable sympathy despite his perversion.

'MRS SLATER. About 40 years old. A married spinster. Partly responsible for her husband's behaviour. She finds him repulsive when he is around, but worries about him when he disappears.

'DR. MANNINGHAM. Grim, brisk - about 40 years old. Not fond of the police.

'MR SVGBODA. A New-Australian. A good citizen.

'A UNIF. POLICEMAN. No dialogue.

'CONSTABLE.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1970
53
form y separately published work icon A Bit of Culture Howard Griffiths , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1970 Z1920159 1970 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'ARTHUR DEAKIN: Age 40-50. A large, shambling Welshman who has won international fame as a poet. He is a flamboyant character, often drunk, fond of a fistfight whenever he gets the chance. He uses language as a weapon to bluster his way out of tight corners. But all the hammy bluster conceals an insecure personality. He feels himself disintegrating since his wife divorced him. He has even lost the capacity to write. He comes to Melbourne determined to get her back at all costs.

'ELLEN DEAKIN: Age 30-40. An attractive down-to-earth woman. She divorced Arthur because she could see no hope of a reasonable life for herself or her son. But she is still deeply in love with him. So much so that she runs for her life whenever he appears because she knows he can and will talk her round into returning to him. Car driver. Some kind of English accent.

'COLIN CLARK: 30-40. Ellen's current fiancé. Good-looking. He owns an art gallery. Rather pompous with a deep streak of meanness. Car driver.

[Note: The accent in 'fiancé' has been added in black ink.]

'HERBERT MORGAN: 60-70. Petty thief and down-and-out. Arthur befriends him and Herbert repays the friendship with an unswerving loyalty to Arthur. Very sympathetic character.

'JEAN PAISLEY: 22-25. A once attractive girl whose life has been destroyed by mental illness. She breaks into Colin Clark's gallery and slashes several paintings belonging to a valuable international collection.

'GIL SUMMERS: 35-50. Professor of English Literature at a local university. A liberal thinking man who is a little out of his depth in trying to handle Arthur.

'BARMAN: Any age.

'WILSON: / CARTER: Smart-Alec petty crims who refuse Herbert a loan. Both are quite young.

'T.V. INTERVIEWER: 30-40. Interviews Arthur on television.

'FLOOR MANAGER: Has a tussle with Arthur and is very upset when making his complaint at the police station.

'T.V. CAMERAMAN: No dialogue. Resists Arthur's attempt to take over the camera.

'PRESS REPORTER: Interviews Arthur in one scene.

'PRESS PHOTOGRAPHER: Takes photograph.

'WOMEN NEIGHBOUR: Two good film scenes. She protests when she sees Arthur breaking into Ellen's house.

'TWO SCHOOLBOYS: They point out a body to the police. No dialogue.

'EXTRA (FEMALE): Elegant looking, well dressed hotel guest.

'CUSTOMER (MALE) Age 50-60. Prosperous and well-spoken.

'TAXI DRIVER'.

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1970
54
form y separately published work icon Johnny Reb John Dingwall , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1970 Z1917778 1970 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'JOHN HARRIS. 40-50. A clerk, a normal man - until an incident with the police causes him to stand up against what he believes to be an injustice which almost becomes an obsession with him. (Must be able to drive).

'MRS HARRIS. A wife, naturally concerned for her husband. Slightly younger than Harris.

'ARTHUR BULL. 30's. A newspaper man; cynical. Sees in Harris a good story. Able to drive a car.

'MAGISTRATE. A kindly man in court, until Harris tests his patience to the full.

'INSPECTOR COUGHLAN. Used to command and obedience. Has 'diplomacy' - he thinks - until he meets Harris.

'MR SANDERS. A friend of Harris, of same age.

'SWIFT. 60's. An inveterate 'toper' up for his 100th conviction for drunkeness [sic].

'POLICE MECHANIC. An expert in his job.

'PRISONER. 30's. Moronic, sub-normal intelligence.

'CLERK OF THE COURT.

'POLICEMAN 1.

'POLICEMAN 2.

'BREATHALYSER MAN.

'10 EXTRAS. REPORTERS, ONLOOKERS, NEWSCAMERAMEN.'


Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1970
87
form y separately published work icon The Luck of the Irish Douglas Tainsh , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1970 Z1923966 1970 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'MICK O'CONNELL Father. As established in "It's a Great Day".

'MOTHER O'CONNELL As established, but slightly "rougher". She wears very sloppy cardigan, old dress, wrinkled stockings, socks. Her hair is prematurely white. She goes her own quiet way, and is the power in the family.

'SHEENA O'CONNELL Pert, Pretty [sic], sexy and clever. She is the second eldest daughter, has lost her Irish accent.

'KENNETH O'CONNELL Second eldest son. A cheerful extrovert. A no-hoper. Fond of the bottle. Has lost his Irish accent.

'PAT DOOLAN As established.

'KELLY As established.

'MR. BULLOCK

'TOM SPENCER The punters friend [sic]. Crooked, devious, "flash". A crim.

'SKULLY Tough, professional crim. Break and enter type. Big enough to be a stand-over man. Tough, humourless. Must be able to drive.

'TONY-THE-SPAG SPAGINOLO Happy-go-lucky Italian engaged in sly grog activities. Cheerful, out-going.

'MRS. TONY-THE-SPAG Large. Excitable. Works hard at her market stall.

'MR. RYAN S.M. A bit pompous. Weary of sitting in court strying [sic] small-time crims. Not popular with the police. Brusque in speech.

'TRUCK DRIVER Must be able to drive. Young, impressionable, not tough.

'THE DRUNK Few words, but must have good facial expression and reaction.

'CLERK OF COURT Non-speaking.

'TWO ITALIANS Non-speaking.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1970
100
form y separately published work icon The Return of John Kelso John Dingwall , Melbourne : Crawford Productions , 1971 6040320 1971 single work film/TV crime

'Yarra Central detectives investigate a brutal assault after John Kelso, a convicted murderer serving a life sentence, is paroled after 25 years.'

Source: Classic Australian Television. (Sighted: 11/6/2013)

Melbourne : Crawford Productions , 1971
102A
form y separately published work icon Conspiracy Howard Griffiths , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1971 Z1920193 1971 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):


'EDDIE PARRISH: Age 45-50. A former policeman who was sacked from the force. Since then he has used his knowledge of crime and criminals to make himself rich by standing over half the criminals in Melbourne. A big, ruthless, [sic] brute of a man. When he was younger, he had quite a reputation as a footballer and this, plus his wealth, has given him some friends in high places. Banner is determined to crush him. He is equally determined to ruin Banner. Main part.

'DAVE PARRISH Age about 20. Eddie's son but nothing like his father. Eddie is irritated with him for seeming "sissy like" and having no real stomach for the brutality that is an essential feature of Eddie's life and business.

'KAREN CORMACK Age 30. Eddie's girl. Always expensively, if vulgarly dressed. Average intelligence, devoted to Eddie. The greatest worry in her life is that she will grow older, less attractive, and so lose him.

'BURNS Age 40's. Eddie's leading thug. Some dialogue.

'TWO THUGS Any age. Little or no dialogue in two or three scenes.

'ARTHUR JONES Age about 60. Together with Eddie Parrish, he has biggest vote in the play. Arthur is a former Welsh miner, with a lung disease caused by the coal dust. He is an eyewitness of a brute fight between Parrish and Aldo Frascatti, and gives evidence against Parrish in court. Subsequent developments lead to his attempted murder at Parrish's hands. A sympathetic character.

'MADELEINE WREN Age 25-30. Arthur's daughter and his reason for being in Australia. A very attractive woman but with exorbitantly expensive tastes. This aspect of her character causes trouble for her husband John Wren. About 10 scenes.

'JOHN WREN Aged about 30. He is the manager of a car park which is robbed of its takings. Late in the play we discover he was involved in the robbery. A handsome but weak minded man. A main supporting role.

'ALDO FRASCATTI Age 25-30. A crim, of Italian descent but without a strong accent. Rather fly, slick young man who is terrified of Eddie Parrish. Substantial role.

'CARMELO FRASCATTI Age 40-45. Aldo's older brother. Strong accent, more belligerent than Aldo. Smaller part.

'GEORGE MANSELL Age 55-65. Eddie Parrish's solicitor. Professional looking. A little dialogue in the one scene in which he appears.

'TERRY SLATER Any age. Petty criminal who keeps a boarding house. Three or four scenes.

'EMILY GREEN Any age. Working class mother. Appears in one scene only. Has dialogue.

'BILL GREEN Appropriate as Emily's husband. One scene. No dialogue.

'PRESS PHOTOGRAPHER One scene only. Some dialogue.

'POLICEMAN Stands on guard outside supreme court [sic]. One scene only. No dialogue.

'THREE OR FOUR BYSTANDERS Extras in one night scene. (Possibly actual)

'CONSTABLE GRICE As previously cast.

'SUPREME COURT JUDGE Five scenes. Dialogue.

'JUDGE'S ASSOCIATE Five scenes. Dialogue in one.

'PROSECUTING COUNSEL Five scenes. Dialogue.

'6 JURY 6 SPECTATORS Same extras. Doubling as Jury and spectators in five scenes.

'REV. CLAUDE PITT-SMITH 65 or older. A retired clergyman who appears as a witness for the defence in one scene. Oxford accent for his dialogue.

'RAY Constable at Yarra Central police station. A little dialogue.

'PHIL Another constable - extra.

'BARMAN (GEORGE) Age 30-40. Barman at smart hotel and confident [sic] of Eddie Parrish. Medium sized part with substantial areas of dialogue.

'TWO OR THREE DRINKERS Extras, well dressed, in the smart pub.

'INSPECTOR HOGAN Police inspector who investigates allegations of perjury. A hard, tough, inquisitor.'


Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1971
119
form y separately published work icon You Couldn't Meet a Nicer Bloke than Denis when he's Sober John Dingwall , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1971 Z1917787 1971 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'DENIS LAWRENCE About 35, extremely presentable looking. This is a very difficult role. Actor must be brilliant. And able to drive.

'ANN LAWRENCE Perhaps a little younger than her husband. She's beautiful and not the foppish type. Also a difficult role.

'OLD ALCOHOLIC About 50. Must be a good actor. Major role.

'PAUL A man of 40 odd. Prosperous looking. Major role.

'ELDERLY COUPLE IN CAR YARD Both about 60 - 65. Difficult parts, competent actors needed. Both must drive.

'CAR YARD PROP. About 40. Car Yard Prop. type.

'BARMAN About 30.

'MECHANIC About 30.

'PLUMBER About 45.

'MAGISTRATE That type.

'COURT CLERK That type.

'MICHAEL YOUNG About 24. This is also a difficult part. Competent actor needed.

'SOLICITOR What about a young, pudgy type? This is also an important role.

'MRS. CHILDS Woman of 45-50.

'FOUR BUSINESS TYPES Age range: 35-40.

'THE MOST BEAUTIFUL GIRL IN THE WORLD. Yes that's right.

'SMALL BOY Aged over seven.

'PLUS: EXTRAS FOR COURTROOM AND BAR SCENES.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1971
125
form y separately published work icon A Continental Gentleman Luis Bayonas , 1971 Z1914334 1971 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'ANTON: Middle 50's. He's been through war and a lot of suffering and has a fatalistic sense of life.

'MRS. McDOUGAL: Late 40's or early 50's. Good looking, kind-hearted, sentimental. Feels both maternal and romantic about Anton.

'WOODSIE: Early 20's, impulsive and thoughtless. Over-cool, over-confident.

'TOM: Late 30's, intelligent, professional thief.

'CRAIG: Middle 40's. Anton's ex-boss. A hypocrite.

'TIM: Early 30's. A hippy bum. (Dropout, phoney hippy). Lazy, dirty, well-educated. His stink must be almost visual.

'SARAH: Middle 30's. A senior prostitute with a divine personality.

'KATIE: Pretty, young, middle 20's. Pro., with a lot of confidence, very cool and pleasant. Anton's wife.

'RON: Middle 30's. A painter (painters and dockers crew) Malicious, distrusts everybody.

'CAPTAIN: A veteran sailor. Minds his business. Late 40's.

'SHOP ASSISTANT: Not camp.

'3 YOUNG PEOPLE (EXTRAS): Well-dressed, rich, mod, snob.

'GORGEOUS GIRL: (1) Same kind as above.

'BARMAN:

'CUSTOMER:

'LADY: (Gets knocked down).

'DRIVER OF VAN:

'2 GUARDS:

'6 PAINTERS AND DOCKERS:

'POLICE ACTUALS: (If available).'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1972
134
form y separately published work icon A Place of My Own How Much, Love? J.M. Copeland , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1972 Z1937947 1972 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'EVIE MORRIS: Age 22. Pretty, with an excellent figure. A truly nice girl. Not educated, not intelligent, nor real abilities. Her longing for a home of her own is her reason for prostitution. She loves her husband, is dominated by him, but not a coward. She's naive and somewhat sensitive.

'GEORGE MORRIS: Age 25. He's stolid, reliable but not imaginative. A factory worker. Believes that a man should support his family and should be seen to do so. He loves Evie, but it's in a taken-for-granted way. When his wife's prostitution is revealed, his whole world crumbles. He'll continue married life, but probably never forgive.

'MARIE MORRIS: Age 16 - 17. Hates school, suspects she isn't bright enough to benefit from it any longer. Her ambition is to punch a cash-register in a Supermarket. Likes Evie, respects George, her brother, but thinks him old-fashioned. Her confirmed suspicions of Evie make her react childishly, smash things, become hysterical.

'ALAN WILLIAMS: Age 30. Tall, well-built, good-looking. Polite, charming and well-spoken. Confident and apparently not short of money. Although he lives off women, he doesn't really like them, is perhaps impotent. Finally revealed as a sadist who enoys bashing women.

'JOYCE GREEN: Age 28 - 30. Attractive, reasonable figure. Devoted to Alan, she has a small daughter. She isn't stupid, she isn't hardened yet. Cheerful and matter-of-fact, but somewhat romantic.

'COLLEEN: Age 30-35. Practical, working prostitute. Sharp and sarcastic. Dominated by her bludger, Fred. She's a gaudy dresser. Irritated by our over zealous policewoman.

'FRED: Age 40. Not tall, but solid build. He belts Colleen now and then to keep her in line. It's a way of life. He's always lived off women. They're a necessary commodity. Basically a coward, but not sadistic like Alan.

'SOLICITOR: Age 45. Smooth, business like. Nothing shocks him.

'SALLY: Age 30. Easy going, practical, until she finds herself sheltering a couple of killers. Furious, she throws them out. A prostitute.

'MR. ROBERTS: Age 50. Solid, respectable and straight-laced. A local councillor and J.P.

'OLD PRO: Age 50-55. A dirty, drink sodden wreck of a woman. Pathetic and slightly disgusting.

'1ST FEM. EXTRA: Age 18. Probably been in Homes for most of her life. A prostitute.

'2ND FEM. EXTRA: Age 25. Working Prostitute.

'1ST MAN / CLIENT / MALE EXTRA / CUSTOMER : All of them respectable and well-dressed.

'2 TAXI DRIVERS: Actual.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1972
144
form y separately published work icon A Waste of Time Colin Eggleston , 1971 Z1917597 1971 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'ARTHUR SIDNEY MORRISON 50-60. Been in and out of gaol all his life. Well known to Banner. Bad tempered pathetic old man.

'CHAPLAIN R.C. Prison chaplain. Must not be sanctimonious.

'GEORGE Crim. 40-60. A bit past it but not willing to give in.

'HENRY Crim. Easily led by George. A rabbit.

'MR. ROBINSON Keeps a boarding house. Butch oz.

'JOHN TAYLOR/MORRISON Arthur's son. 25-30. Successful. Has conviction for extortion.

'STELLA McQUEEN Arthur's estranged wife. Puts on airs but, underneath, is a harridan.

'FOREMAN Agrees, as a favour to Banner, to give Arthur a job.

'DRINKER 1 One difficult scene. Truck driver type

'DRINKER 2 One difficult scene.

'WORKMAN (FACTORY) Has argument with Arthur.

'BUILDING WORKER That type.

'WATCH SELLER Little man. Shifty.

'BARMAN Working class pub.

'OLD MAN Arthur's age.

'WOMAN Shopper 45-50.

'FLAT DWELLER

'2 BAR EXTRAS Working class pub.

'2 MORE BAR EXTRAS Working class pub.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1972
154
form y separately published work icon Natural Victim Howard Griffiths , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1972 Z1920212 1972 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'PETER WATSON: The first "natural victim". Aged 25 with a mental age of about 14. Well-built and good-looking, he has a record for sexual offences against young girls. He is picked up as a suspect by the police, and this experience upsets the balance he has struggled hard to attain. He becomes aware that he is losing his battle against his old urges and tries to warn the police, but he is too inarticulate to make his fears clear to them.

'BARBARA O'BRIEN: The second "natural victim". A schoolgirl of 15 or 16 at odds with the world because of a disturbed home background. She senses the dangerous element in Watson's make-up and is attracted to it - "playing with fire." She even has a subconscious knowledge that one day he may kill her, and some compulsion draws her towards this end.

'BRIAN LANE: Age 29-33. About the same build as Watson. A sexual psychopath, but with a non-descript exterior. He seems the average, suburban family man. Fairly smooth and glib. Car driver.

'MR. O'BRIEN: Age 40-45. Barbara's father. He has a business dealing in second-hand furniture. Interested mainly in beer and his greyhounds. Dislikes his wife, indifferent to his daughter. Curses the day he ever got married.

'MRS. O'BRIEN: Age 40-45, but she has let herself go and looks older. The marriage has turned her into a neurotic and nagging shrew. Pretends to care for Barbara but in reality uses her simply as a bone of contention with her husband.

'DENISE WRIGHT: Age 15-16. Attends school with Barbara. A nice, shy, ordinary kid, perhaps even a little young for her age. She becomes Lane's last victim.

'MRS. WRIGHT: Age 35-40. Denise's mother. She becomes worried when Denise goes missing and later has to take the news that she has been raped. A neat, nice sympathetic woman.

'SHOP ASSISTANT (MISS WEST) Age 23 -30. Average looks. Mousy personality. Mr. O'Brien's mistress.

'LESLEY MITCHELL. Age 14-16. Early victim. She has to try to identify her attacker in a line up.

'PROPRIETOR OF CAFE. Age 22-30. Camp and pleasant to all customers. Sympathetic to Mrs. Wright when she comes to the cafe looking for her missing daughter.

'MARY. Age 15-16. Denise's friend, but cheeky and knowing in constrast to Denise's shyness. One scene only.

'YOUTH. Age 18-20. Chats to cafe proprietor. One scene, ordinary all-Australian type.

'PARKIN. Age 29-33. Would help if he had a fleeting resemblance to Brian Lane, because he is wrongly identified as Lane in a line-up.

'TRUCK DRIVER. Any age. Bass singing voice. A big, friendly man who finds Denise after she has been attacked. One scene, driver.

'ANGRY MOTORIST. Age 25-40. Has a minor collision with Lane's car and gets very worked up about it. One scene. Driver.

'HOSPITAL DOCTOR. Age 23-27. Brief scene with Vickers. Dialogue.

'SCHOOLGIRL VICTIM. Age 14-16. Fails to identify anyone at the line-up. No dialogue.

'TEENAGE GIRL. Seen at a distance taking her dog for a walk in the park. One scene. No dialogue.

'FOUR MEN FOR LINE-UP. No dialogue. One scene.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1972
155
form y separately published work icon When in Rome Charles E. Stamp , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1972 Z1937994 1972 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'PHILLIP REID: 25/27 Well spoken. Middle class. Able to ride motor cycle. Copies method of stealing learned in Italy. 5'7" to 5'10"

'SAMANTHA YOUNG: 22/24 No dialogue. Good young female face. Long fair hair. Should be able to ride pillion passenger in simple scenes.

'MAMA RUFFINI: 45/50 Italian born. English good. Hotel cook. Able to ride motor cycle ... 5'7" to 5'10"

'GIOVANNI (JOHN) RUFFINI: 20/25 Italian born. English good. Hotel cook. Able to ride motor cycle ... 5'7" to 5'10"

'DONALD MORRIS: 20/25 Australian. Boards with Ruffini's. Working class cook. Able to ride motor cycle. 5'7" to 5'10"

'BILL BROWN: (STAN MARSHALL) 20/25 Australian. Working class. 5'7" to 5'10" Able to ride a motor cycle. More dominant than Green.

'JOHN GREEN: (ALEC MASON) 20/25 Australian. Working class. 5' 5'10" [sic] Weaker than Brown.

'EDWARD FINCH: 45/55 Middle class business man. Well spoken.

'MR. KAVANAGH: 40/50 Commerical traveller type.

'LOSER: 30/40 Young executive type. Few lines.

'MR. FINDLAY: Young. Medium height, need not be able to ride. No lines.

'MR. JOHNSON: Young. As for Findlay. No lines.

'MARIO RUSSO: 35/40 Slight Italian accent. Working class.

'MARIA RUSSO: 30/35. Stronger Italian accent.

'MRS HAWKE: 40/50 Tough working class Australian.

'MRS GIBBONS: 55/66 Frail and small. Pensioner type.

'FIONA: Young. Healthy Australian bird type. Does not have to be able to ride bike.

'LOIS: Young. As above.

'MAN READING NEWSPAPER: 40/60. Working man. No lines.

'PEDESTRIAN: 50/65. Working on pensioner type.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1972
160
form y separately published work icon Flight Plan Charles E. Stamp , 1972 Z1938030 1972 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'IAN TAYLOR: 35 years. Tall, slim athletic build. A determined handsome face. Well spoken. Good education. Businesslike manner. A senior shipping clerk who steals a vast sum of money belonging to his employer. He has an air of industrious respectability; is supposedly happily married, but is deeply involved with a young female employee. He is completely ruthless and selfish. Able to drive.

'FRAN TAYLOR: 30/33. An attractive woman with poise and dignity. She loves her husband ... trusts him ... and although she has had doubts about his past behaviour ... overlooks it and tries to deny to herself and others his essential weakness. Well spoken ... good carriage and grooming.

'"FRENCHY" RENAUD: 32/35. Detective Sergeant in Sydney N.S.W. Police. A good friend of Banner's .... a real mate able to see eye to eye with him. He assists Banner in Sydney. He knows Sydney ... its characters ... its criminals. It's his town. He was born and raised there. Physically tough ... mentally sharp ... and a happy Australian nature. Not taller than Banner. Able to drive (N.S.W. Licence).

'JIM FLOYD : 27/29. Detective in Sydney, N.S.W. The same physical build as Taylor. (He must wear Taylor's suit) Renaud's offsider. Friendly. Tough. Willing Australian.

'LILY "REID": A dear old darling duck of a twister. Late middle aged. A shrewd faggot who deals in pornography and forgery from her Sydney studio home. She is "awfully far-out English" ... could be the bishop's wife ... is eccentric ... the oldest flower girl in Sydney. Like Elsa Lanchester doing her "thing".

'MR. CLAYBURN: 50/60. Small .... fat ... pompous ... useless and dithering shipping office departmental manager.

'KAREN BAXTER: 26/28. Very attractive female in shipping office. Sexy flirt. Good full figure. Speech good. Intelligent. Good leg appeal. An affinity with Taylor which causes her to be suspect.

'SARAH ROBERTS: 17/19. A young typist in the shipping office. She looks like a sweetly innocent girl not long out of school; not yet fully developed physically. She seems shy ... gauche ... but she possesses the cunning to fool everybody; to conceal the fact she is heavily involved with Taylor. Unscrupulous. Stupid.

'NEIL BRYANT: 19/20. Assistant cashier in shipping office. Not physically large. Quiet ... well spoken. Nervous. He handles the cash; is escorted and robbed and assaulted by Taylor.

'CHIEF PURSER: 45/50. He waits to receive the money on his ship ... the "Madrigal". No dialogue. Hefty appearance.

'KITTY: 25/30. A photographic model with a stunning figure. Able to strip and pose convincingly. She poses for Lily's porno art.

'BERT: 25/35. A stud bull type. Photographic model with a good physique. He poses for Lily's porno art.

'TWO RED DE LUXE TAXI DRIVERS: ... Actual Sydney cabbies. Try for one female to make a change. (Red de luxe is the Sydney tie-in company). No dialogue.

'ALEC PERRY: 40/45. Friend of Detective Sergeant Renaud. Owns small boat. Finds attache case stolen by Taylor. Australian. Cheerful type. Healthy extrovert.

'MRS. FINNEY: 50/60. Owns boarding house where Taylor stays. A rugged individualist ... cheerful ... Australian. Must have been a doll.

'TWO OR THREE ACTUAL UNIFORMED N.S.W. POLICE: ... If available and co-operative. No dialogue.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1973
172
form y separately published work icon Big Bad John Keith Hetherington , 1972 Z1921923 1972 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'"BIG BAD JOHN" SMITH: Tough Senior Detective Sergeant from Sydney C.I.B. Sent to Melbourne. His daughter has run away with long-hair Fletcher and Smith hates long-hairs (Kiwi long-hairs in particular). He has a reputation for going through the Sydney Underworld like a packet of salts, getting results but not always without embarrassment to the N.S.W. Police Force. Early 50's .... Big, beefy, hard-looking man.

'VAL SMITH: "Big Bad John's" 18 year old daughter. Attractive, intelligent, tries to reform Fletcher whom she thinks the sun shines out of. Loves her father but feels alienated because of his attitude to Fletcher. Maternal instinct strong.

'"HANK" FLETCHER: New Zealander. Uni. Student, long hair. Cunning, smooth talker, Crim tendencies. About 20. Vicious, as bad as Smith makes out. (Gerald McGuire type.)

'MRS. HUDSON: Attractive young widowed socialite, late 20's, early 30's. Victim of robbery and bashing, and tough questioning by Smith.

'COLLINS: Owner of Jeweller's Shop. 50's. Clean Police record, abides by the rules. A gentle man. Bashed by Fletcher.

'BELL: Rooming-House Owner. Scruffy, 40's - wears a wig.

'MRS. JOHNSON: Flat owner; nosy-but-nice type. Enjoys good gossip and some else's [sic] tragedy, but stays on the right side of the Law. 40/50.

'SHOP ASSISTANT: Young, helpful, stock character, few lines only.

'HIPPY 1 & HIPPY 2: Young, long-haired, larrikin types, but no real harm in them. Picked on by Smith because of their long hair and because they were larking about. Few lines for No. 1.

'CAR DEALER: Stock character. Few lines, but should be able to act well under the tough tactics used by Smith.

'SYDNEY SUPERINTENDANT: Distinguished type; hard but fair. 50's.

'D.D.I.: Distinguished, 50's. N/S but should be able to express feelings facially.

'DOCTOR: May be required for scene where D's go to see Mrs. Hudson after bashing. Stock character if Government doctor; if private, distinguished, very much on the side of Mrs. Hudson; she must rest, etc. Middle-aged.'

Note: The casting call sheets suggest that the character called 'Collins' in the character notes is re-named 'Zuka' before production.

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1973
185
form y separately published work icon Voice of the Gun Roger Simpson , Ian Jones , 1972 Z1919695 1972 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'JENNY FRANKLIN: Late 20's. Attractive, intelligent, forthright. A widely travelled but unpretentious girl. She has a clear idea of what she wants from life and goes about it with a realistic determination.

'ALBERT REGAN: 40's. A seasoned criminal whose career to date has been non-violent. He's very much a loner who, through circumstances, has teamed up with a young criminal for a prison escape, and then finds himself caught up in a treadmill of cause and effect, beyond his comprehension and control.

'DESMOND BAKER: 19. A small and unattractive juvenile crim driven to violence by social impotence. Confused and unstable.

'MRS. REGAN: 40ish. An unintelligent rather weak woman. Uncritical, easily committed.

'DEBBIE REGAN: 19. Attractive rather tarty girl who possibly looks older than her years following a precarious introduction to prostitution. Already her emotions are calloused by her conscious suppression of any tenderness or warmth.

'BOYFRIEND: 30's. Unprincipled opportunist. A well-to-do bludger - totally lacking in taste or courage.

'HARRY JACKS: 40's. Plump, squat, sleazily prosperous - a fringe crim and fence.

'MR. APEX: 50's. A small and balding hole-in-the-wall businessman, who lives in the wood-work at an all-but-condemned office building.

'KERRY MICHAELS: 19. Attractive childlike dreamy pot-head.

'LORRAINE HUNT: Late 20's. Attractive, tall, dominant when required, a sometime incestuous mother-figure to Kerry.

'REVEREND LEWIS: 50's. Trying very hard to be up with it. A man who makes much of his contact with the world of the delinquent but contributes little. Rather glib and superficial.

'INSPECTOR CRAINE: 40's. Seasoned Homicide Inspector. Physically impressive, alert and decisive.

'HOMICIDE SERGEANT:

'PRESTON: Established.

'POLICE WEAPONS INSTRUCTOR: Actual if possible.

'PASSERBY: Middle aged woman.

'POLICE EXTRAS: (3).

'BYSTANDERS:

'WOMAN CASUALTY: Middle aged.

'BANK MANAGER:

'CONSTABLE FRASER: Suggest stunt man for death scene.

'JILL FRASER: 20's. Wife of fatally wounded policeman. One important scene with Dwyer.

'DOCTOR:

'AMBULANCE MEN: Actual.

'POLICE DEPOT PERSONNEL: Actual.

'SEARCH AND RESCUE PERSONNEL: Actual.

'VIOLENT DRUNK:

'TWO CRIMS:

'WEIRDO: 20'ish.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1973
213
form y separately published work icon Triangle Roger Simpson , 1973 Z1919762 1973 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'JENNY FRANKLIN: Late 20's. Attractive, intelligent, forthright. A widely travelled, unpretencious [sic] girl (Established in "Voice of the Gun")

'TIM FREER: An English businessman about the same age as Banner and a rather impressive rival. Exudes confidence, breeding, and good taste. Romantically involved with Jenny when she was in England.

'CHARLIE GIBSON: Late 40's. A crack safe-blower until an accident partially disabled his right arm. But he carries his injury well, and until specifically referred to, it's not noticeable. A possessive, humourless man who married late in life a woman he doesn't really understand.

'STELLA GIBSON: His wife of three years. Mid 30's. Ex-showgirl and prostitute. Warm, ample and accomodating [sic]. Married to have kids and is probably neurotic that she hasn't been able to.

'RICKY BURNS: Early 20's. Stella's nephew. A stock hand at the City sale yards. A general layabout who takes life casually. A juvenile record of minor offences - but this is his first attempt at the "big time". Drives.

'EDWARD PALMER: Late 30's to early 40's. A crim with a substantial record and a man capable of almost anything. A rather remote character whose introversion is easily misinterepreted by Gibson as mistrust.

'PAY CLERK: Middle-aged unimpressive and conservative. It's a real surprise when he stands up to the crims.

'SECRETARY: 18. Mod and trendy with a tendency to overdress. Probably her first job since leaving school.

'MOTORIST:

'UNIFORMED CONSTABLE (STUNTMAN): Requires some acting ability.

'YOUNG BOY: As young as possible, preferably about six.

'UNIFORMED POLICE CONSTABLE: Few lines.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1974
215
form y separately published work icon Talk Back Roger Simpson , Melbourne : Crawford Productions , 1973 6040420 1973 single work film/TV crime

'Billly Miller, a 10-year-old boy, goes missing. His disappearance went unnoticed by his mother, and Yarra Central police search for his body in a creek at the tip, and fear that a man with a known record of sex offences is involved.'

Source Classic Australian Television. (Sighted: 11/6/2013)

Melbourne : Crawford Productions , 1973
229
form y separately published work icon Mad About the Boy Jonathan Dawson , 1973 Z1935419 1973 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'CHRIS RAPP: 19-21. Male model looks with aspirations, mainly in the direction of money. He uses both Jill and Pru. Cold-blooded and amoral. Must drive.

'JILL FERRIS: 30-32. Extremely attractive divorcee who runs a small talent agency. Has fallen in love with Chris and is totally blind to his true character.

'RON BRYANT: 18-20. A rough young man with no brains and no finesse.

'PRU TURNER: 17-18. A gum chewing bopper. Sexy and unintelligent.

'DIXIE PALMER: 30-50. A professional fence. He doesn't like fizzing, but feels that Chris, etc., are doing the profession irreputable [sic] damage.

'CARLA: Jill's Girl Friday. Attractive and competent looking.

'OLD LADY: 60-70. A few lines. The victim of a brutal assault.

'BOUTIQUE OWNER: Female. 30. Snooty.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1974
234
form y separately published work icon The Senator's Wife Ray Chamula , 1973 Z1920072 1973 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'LUCILLE LESTER. 55-60. Well spoken, articulate, intelligent. Despite a record of hallucinating, she can be calm and lucid. Withstands a lot of pressure before going to pieces.

'ROGER WILLIS. 25-30. Average speech. Big, fit man. Police are hard pressed to overpower him. He is handsome and dresses well.

'LINDSAY BARKER. 35-40. Rough speech. Hardened crim. Know what he's at. Must drive.

'TERRI REYNOLDS. 25. Doctor's secretary/mistress. Intelligent, seemingly pleasant, well spoken, attractive. Must drive.

'JAMES SLATER. 55. Well spoken. Company director with friends in the right places. Conservative.

'DOCTOR EDWARDS. 50. Psychiatrist. Well spoken, stylish, relaxed, detached.

'NODDY BAINES. Professional go-between.

'PRESTON. Uniformed police constable.

'WOMAN. 30. Housewife type. Rough speech.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1974
239
form y separately published work icon Cleanliness is Next to Godliness Gwenda Marsh , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1974 Z1913930 1974 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'SERGEANT JOAN PALMER: 35. A woman detective assigned to Yarra Central to investigate missing females.

'RALPH MORRIS: 45. A respected Yarra Central Councillor. Also the masked rapist.

'ROSS FARREL: 35. When his wife disappears he is suspected by Police of murdering her.

'JENNIFER FARREL: 30. 1st victim. She is abducted by the rapist and left to die in a storm water sewerage drain.

'KATHY BISHOP: 25. Ross Farrel's secretary. She and Ross had an affair in the past.

'CINDY MORRIS: 20. Ralph's daughter. A go go dancer.

'SUE CHAPMAN: 25. 2nd Victim. She is rescued by Police before the rapist can abduct her.

'CLAUDE: 60. A derelict. Works part time for the council sweeping streets. At one stage is suspected of being the masked rapist.

'MRS GRAY: 50. Jennifer Farrel's mother. She tells the Detectives of Ross's affair with his secretary.

'MRS TAYLOR: 60. Witnesses 2nd attack. Feels helpless.'


Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1974
246
form y separately published work icon The Vigil John Orcsik , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1974 Z1938038 1974 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'TERRI STANDISH: A policewoman for over ten years. She is well known to Yarra Central. Respected with an excellent police record. She has a mild and gentle nature.

'HELGA STEINER: About fifty years of age. A prisoner in a German prison camp for Jews. Although herself not being Jewish she refused to give up her husband who was, and was therefore detained with him. The experience brought her close to insanity by the end of the war when she was released by the allies [sic]. She recovered with the help of her husband and migrated to Australia, to lead a fairly good life. Her husband's death triggers her unstable mind and the sight of uniforms, especially police, unlocks the horrors of the war.

'Terri Standish out of uniform is a friend but once in uniform she sees only the Gestapo whom she must destroy.

'SUE EDWARDS: Young policewoman. Fairly new to the game but she's known by all at Yarra Central.

'HILDA SCHMIDT: Large German woman. Also has a fear of the police syndrome.

'STEPHEN PECK: Hungarian Jewish estate agent. A greasy little man who worries only about his business.

'VICKY NOLAN: A spoilt seventeen year old. Her father dotes on her and she thinks she can get away with anything.

'MRS NOLAN: Her mother. Well spoken. Has all but ignored her daughter in the last seventeen years. Must drive.

'NORMA BARRET: Seventeen. Hates police after her boyfriend was gaoled.

'CAROL WRIGHT: Considers Barret as her protege. A tough crim who has seen the inside of Fairlea many times.

'DRUNK: Some slurred dialogue.

'CONSTABLE A: Young. No lines.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1974
249
form y separately published work icon A Touch of Art Tom Mclennan , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1974 Z1938083 1974 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'CHARLIE HILL: 35. Good looking with an air of failure about him. Emotionally disturbed. Taken some hard knocks. Must drive.

'SUSAN HILL: 30. Pretty, but very tired. She's borne a lot of responsibility over the years. Strong personality. Basically middle class. Suburban.

'JOHNNY HILL: 7. Very shy and of fragile constitution. Loves both his parents.

'EDDIE ROSOLINO: 45. Ex-con. Reformed, now successful artist. Rough hewn, but easy going nature.

'GERALD MOORE: 55. English and a bit superior. Elegant dresser. Art critic who wields an acidic pen. Snob. Surrounds himself with good taste.

'WALTER MACDIVOTT: 55-60. Former fence, now reformed and respectable Large man, possibly with bushy beard. Modified Bohemian.

'LUCY MACDIVOTT: 35-40. Nice looking. No lines.'

'GLADYS TOOMEY: 30-35. Very hip. Cultivates arty people. Very anti-establishment, but tolerant as well.

'JACK NEELEY: 65. Pensioner. Bar fly.

'TOM SULLEY: 65-70. Metho drinker. Comic role.

'DOUG STEPHENS: 50. Ex-service man. Burly, self made. Fancies a hero image. A suuccessful business man. A modern expensive home.

'POLICEMEN (2): Both uniformed. No lines.

'HIPPIE: Extra. 20. Male. Long hair. No lines.

'TAXI DRIVER: Friendly talkative.

'MAN: No lines. Must drive.

'WOMAN: No lines.

'DOG:

'2 MEN IN A PUB'.

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1974
253
form y separately published work icon The Woman from Poland David Stevens , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1974 Z1933918 1974 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'HANNA LEITZ: About 56. Came to Australia from Poland in 1958. Speaks English with a heavy accent. A small woman whose life is dominated by her adoration for her dead son, and her formidable guilt complex on the other. Devout Orthodox Jew.

'CRAIG HENDERSON: 17, but looks younger. A golden headed boy, charming on the surface, but with a violent sadistic streak. Australian.

'MRS CONNOR: Garrulous busybody of Irish ancestry. Very loud, and about 45.

'ITALIAN DRUNK: Expansive drunken shearers cook. 40.

'MORGAN: Night manager of service station. 55?

'WARD SISTER: Mid 30s. Efficient, practical.

'OLD MAN: 70. All he lives for is his dog. Decrepit.

'FRANK HENDERSON: 45. Alcoholic crim. Has been in Pentridge most of his life. It is essential that neither he nor Rita (below) should be played for laughs.

'RITA: Frank's mistress. 40. Fat and blowsy. Please don't send her up.

'GARAGE MANAGER: 40. Cheerful Australian.

'ATTENDANT: 22. Mechanic. Australian.

'ETHEL JACOBS: The antithesis of Hanna. A cheerful, jolly woman. 50. Preferably Jewish.

'POLICE CONSTABLE ONE: Young, speaking

'POLICE CONSTABLE TWO: Young, speaking'.

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1974
258
form y separately published work icon Middleman Roger Simpson , Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1974 Z1919786 1974 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'RAINCOAT: Late fifties. An ex-crim - once a big time fence - but now a sickly, broken little man, with a variety of dirty habits and perversions.

'RON MURPHY: Early twenties - a tough, physical crim with a record for violence.

'GARY HASTINGS: His mate - about the same age. Generally more easy going - but just as violent when aroused. Drives a truck and a stacker. (Stand-in possible but preferable if actor can drive).

'SELINA YOUNG: 20. Gary's girlfriend. Sexy in a crude and obvious kind of way. From a pretty tough background.

'NIGHT WATCHMAN: A retired policeman.

'DESPATCH FOREMAN'.

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1974
259
form y separately published work icon Man of Substance Roger Simpson , 1974 Z1919813 1974 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'DAVID FLEMING: 40ish. Property Developer and Speculator. Outwardly the suave successful and very wealthy businessman. A compulsive gambler.

'COLIN MORGAN: Mid forties. Fleming's partner and brother-in-law. Formerly an accountant. He goes along with Fleming on the pretence of protecting his sister. In fact, he just doesn't have the guts to do otherwise.

[Note: The apostrophe in "Fleming's" has been added in black ink.]

'SANDRA FLEMING: Mid thirties. Fleming's wife. Bored, comfortably kept, neurotic but with good cause. Unaware her husband's gambling is a problem.

'CHARLIE EVANS: 30ish. Big, burly, and simply. Mildly retarded - an invalid pensioner.

'LANDLADY: (MRS REILLY) Affectionately known as "Ma". Boarding house proprietoress.

'BOOKIE: (BERNIE HOLT) A medium operator. Like all Bookies a gambler himself.

'SECRETARY: (JAN) Early 20's. Flemings secretary [sic].

'NANCY: About 20. Shop assistant. Coarse, but kind.

'STREET CLEANER: Semi retired - bit of a hard case.

'WOMAN SHOPPER:

'AMBULANCE MAN:

'DOCTOR:

'SGT. ROGERS:

'SHOP ASSISTANT.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1975
266
form y separately published work icon The Lame Ducks Douglas Tainsh , 1974 Z1924002 1974 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'COLONEL HARRIS: 60 years old. A man of precise, military habits and bearing. Dresses fastidiously. An ex-probation man, he has met no recognition from either this or his military service.

'JIMMY DUNN: 35-40. A rather dour type of criminal, a fitness fanatic, is an expert on Karate and Judo. Cold, calculating and ruthless, can be violent. A killer.

'SELWYN FRANCIS (DUSTY) MILLER: 35. A rough-and-ready type of crim. Has done time, the Colonel was once his parole officer. A mechanic.

'LENNIE FIELDS: 35. A crim. Fairly athletic, smart in his movements.

'DICK LEE: 25-20. A young crim. Rather sensative [sic], a rough up-bringing has prevented him from achieving better things.

'JENNY HARRIS: 25. A young, attractive girl, daughter of the Colonel. An accident has caused her to live in a wheel chair [sic]. Loves her father, even if she thinks he is eccentric.

'PAY CLERK / BODY GUARD: McArthurs Building site. [sic]

'PHILLIP SCHOFIELD: 50 - 60. The very well to do Managing Director of Amalgamated Indemnity. A friend of serveral [sic] high-up policemen, including the Inspector and Vickers.

'2 SECURITY MEN / 1 ELDERLY SECURITY MAN: Amalgamated Security.

'POLICE SEARCH AND RESCUE SQUAD Actuals.

'CAR DRIVER (SCENE B)

'PAY CAR DRIVER (SCENE QQ AND CCC)'.

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1975
276
form y separately published work icon No Prize for Second Douglas Tainsh , 1974 Z1924024 1974 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'TRACEY MILLS 40. A tough, but very intelligent ex-massage parlour lady who has battled her way up to where she owns her own salon. In all, a very sympathetic character.

'CNCR. BRADEN SMITH: 50. A very prominent and influential councillor of Yarra Central. Under the guise of a man bent on reform he is, in fact, the owner of several brothels and parlours.

'SIMON SMITH: 22. His arrogant, very scruffy son.

'SYDNEY MARTIN: 55. A very devious man, associated with Cncr. Smith. A practising solicitor, who is very unpopular with the Police of Yarra Central because of the many clashes he has had with them in the past.

'ANGEL WOOD: 25. A pretty masseuse employed by Tracey. (A nice kid)

'FREDDIE JACKSON: 35. Tracey's boy-friend and protector. Simple, a man who relies on force as a solution to everything. His weakness shows when he betrays her in favour of the big strength.

'MICK CONNORS: 30. A heavy employed by Smith. Also a council workman.

'"FRIENDLY" FLYNN: 30. A heavy employed by Smith. He is a foreman on the Council work staff.

'DUNCAN GREEN: A mechanic, a friend of Banners. [sic]

'SIR LESLEY: 50. Never referred to by full name.

'MONICA BROOME: 16. Schoolgirl, daughter of Traceys. [sic] Innocent, very likeable.

'PHOTOGRAPHER: A "smart" news photographer.

'CUSTOMER: A frightened little New Australian who frequents Tracey's Massage Parlour.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1975
277
form y separately published work icon The Fanatic Sonia Borg , 1974 Z1913015 1974 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'RON SLATER: 45 years old; English or Australian. There is something bizarre, pathetic and at the same time frightening about this little man. He looks quite indifferent, but is driven by a deep-seated inferiority complex. He is very intense, speaks in a low, clipped voice, and moves briskly and purposefully. He is not insane, though his obsessive hatred of foreigners borders on insanity. However, his manner must appear normal. Drives.

'JACK BRADLEY: 18 years old. His father is an alcoholic and wife-basher. Bradley, rather weak, lonely and simple, has not made friends with youngsters of his own age. He felt he was a misfit - until he joined the White Progressive Party. He admires Slater greatly He [sic] gives leadership, and he does not drink. Bradley is the dupe who will unquestioningly do what he is told. There is an unspoken homosexual quality about his admiration for Slater.

'EMMANUEL CZOSKI (PRONOUNCE CHOSKY) Polish. Fifty-five. Speaks English well. A successful businessman, thanks to a good head and very hard work. He is an arrogant man, has no talent to assimilate. Drives

'ANNA CZOSKI: His daughter. In her early twenties. Good-looking and intelligent. Born in Australia. Has a good deal of courage and pride. (no accent) Drives. [sic]

'MRS SLATER: A sweet, homely little woman, fond of flowers and pretty things. Her marriage to Slater was a disaster, but she has got over it. She has turned off the past and now lives in her own small world.

'BERYL KING: Slater's landlady. About fifty. Widowed or divorced, rough and matter-of-fact. Likes the boys, horse-racing and drink, but manages to lead a reasonably respectable life.

'FINCH: Late thirties. Australian or English. Storeman at quarry.

'HENDRICKS: Explosive expert. Matter-of-fact. Australian.

'UNIFORMED POLICE 2 extras.'


Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1975
286
form y separately published work icon Little Raver Everett de Roche , 1974 Z1915981 1974 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'WENDY SHERLOCK (16) Wendy is a "little raver" ... very attractive, very sweet, unusually intelligent. Her parents suspect she's a raving psychopath, and have kept her caged in the garage for over a year. They are proven to be correct.

'MR. SHERLOCK: (Late 30's) Wendy's father. He's lived with a terrible secret for over ten years, and the stress shows in his appearance and his manner. A man on the verge of nervous collapse. Is an unsuccessful artist - tends to be a little trendy - but is not arty.

'MRS SHERLOCK: Wendy's mother. Like Mr. Sherlock, she's at her wit's end. Believes that her daughter is a genetic monster. Intelligent - good educational background

'POLICEWOMAN: Jane Bell. Established character. In this story, she's caught between her intuitions as a woman and the cool logic required of a good policewoman.

'TONY LATIMER: (18) Skin-head (or rough). Victim of a macabre slashing.

'WALLY: (18) Skin-head (or rough). Tony's mate.

'DOCTOR: One scene only, but fairly heavy dialogue.

'MATRON: In charge of the girls at the Social Welfare Department.

'RITA: (16) An attractive girl at Social Welfare.

'NEIGHBOUR LADY: Lives next door to Sherlocks. Little dialogue. Comic role.

'GIRL: One scene only. No dialogue.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1975
287
form y separately published work icon Big Fish—Small Fry John Orcsik , 1974 Z1938142 1974 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'JANIE SOMMERS: An extremely attractive young woman of twenty-five. She's well educated and intelligent. Been Barrett's "girl" for about 18 months. A position she loathes, but is of her own making. She wants to ruin him completely. The arrival of Gardiner onto the scene has given her such an opportunity.

'FRANK GARDINER: Twenty eight years of age. Intelligent but not highly educated. Good looking with an athletic build he's naturally attractive to women. A quiet and introspective nature. He has a third dan grading in Goju Kai and worked as an instructor in Sydney for a while. He's strangely honest and doesn't immediately accept Janie's proposal that he unseat Barrett and take over the organisation. His ambitions don't run that high. Drives.

'JAMES BARRETT: A fat obnoxious fifty year old gentleman who thinks he has the world in his grasp and also everybody in it. Nobody just "works" for Barrett. They belong to him. He's a successful solicitor who used his knowledge to set up a large and extremely profitable gambling organisation.

'JIM STEVENS: About 45 years old. Tending to paunch and bald. An accountant with a wife and two children. A solid middle class citizen with an ulcer.

'BARBIE STEWART: A prostitute. About 30 years. Not a street walker. A little classier. Does her hussling [sic] from pubs and clubs. Attractive. Does well in her trade. Known to the police. She has the odd soft spot.

'FREDDIE: Barbie's bludger. He runs several girls. A smallish birdlike man with a ready oily smile.

'DOCTOR THOMAS Doctor at the hospital. A resident. About 40 years. The police know him. A quiet man.

'PROSTITUTES: Three of them. Different types (no dialogue).

'VI STEVENS Wife of Jim Stevens. A little over-weight. Not attractive but not repulsive either. Another solid nebulous middle class housewife.

'INSTRUCTOR: Karato [sic] (DOJO) instructor. (actual)

'STUDENTS: Advanced (actual)

'WOMAN: TAB enthusiast'.

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1975
288
form y separately published work icon Just for Kicks Ray Chamula , 1974 Z1920082 1974 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'JAN KENNEDY: 21. Young, intelligent, attractive, tidy. Gray's girlfriend.

'EDDIE KENNEDY: 17. Her brother. Rough mannerisms, but not necessarily speech. Cannot be talked to. Carries on with a lot of pretence and bravado, but basically insecure and a follower.

'ADAMS: 18. Eddie's mate. Different from Eddie in only two respects. He is a little quicker in thinking and better at changing face.

'MRS. BADGER: 59. Gossipy type. Likes to prattle away.

'MR. STAVROS: 40. A Greek store proprietor. Straight character. (No parody please).

'MRS. ADAMS: 38. Adam's [sic] mother. Her husband left her years ago. She is worn out. Pitiable.

'ATTENDANT: 35. Snooker parlour attendant. Shifty. Doesn't like to be mixed up in anything, although he likes to up with everything.

'BYSTANDER: 30. A big burly fellow. Prevents Eddie's escape from the scene of an accident.

'MR. McDONALD: 40. Driver of car involved in slight accident. Vocal type.

'BARMAN: Two scenes.

'MAN: One scene. No dialogue.

'FOUR SNOOKER PARLOUR EXTRAS: Night Two - Extras - 2// Day Three - Extras - 2.

'ON COMING CAR DRIVER:

'THREE ROAD ACCIDENT EXTRAS'.

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1975
293
form y separately published work icon Once Upon a Time Charles E. Stamp , 1974 Z1938162 1974 single work film/TV crime humour

Comedy episode.


The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'ARTHUR KING: 50-ish. Large and plump. Grand appearance. A very wealthy man living solely on his winnings as a professional punter.

'DAISY KING: His beautiful daughter. In the fairytale style. Sweet ... engaging. Long blonde hair. 20-23.

'MR. CHEESELY: 60-65. The Manager of Apex Finance Company. A doddery old gentleman ... small stature ... Concerned face.

'MISS BENEDICT: 55-ish. His spinster girl-Friday. Thin. Bird-like. Given to quoting biblical matters. Tough. Acid.

'TOM: Mid-twenties ... slim ... too pretty. Mod style. Able to drive.

'DICK: Mid twenties ... too pretty, young executive type.

'HARRY: Mid twenties ... sporty type.

'PUBLIC TUT ATTENDANT: Parking Officer. Father Christmas. 55. Small Working class.

'CHARLES: 26-30. The tall and handsome chauffeur to the King family. Able to drive.

'THREE DRIVERS: Optical types'.

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1975
295
form y separately published work icon Friends? Who Needs 'Em? Keith Hetherington , 1975 Z1923046 1975 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'CHARLES SIMPSON: Data processing businessman. Self-made and proud of it. Very efficient, hard working, honest in his dealings. Happily married but the one big tragedy in his life was the drowning of his five year old daughter, Mandy, five years before the story opens. He's never completely got over it and on her birthdates and the anniversaries of her death tends to take to the drink and become morose. He had a nervous breakdown after the tragedy. A man without enemies and a contemporary of Peters, having known each other since childhood days. DRIVES.

'YVONNE SIMPSON: Charles' attractive wife and also a friend of Peters; but Yvonne is more conscious of her 'position' than Charles, tends to worry about always putting on a good 'front' and is generally more shallow than her husband. But she's a good, faithful wife, pushy, wanting only Charles' success and happiness. There's a bit of a women's libber lying dormant in her and when Charles' [sic] is down in hospital, it surges to the fore and she's instrumental in breaking up the friendship between Peters and Charles. She's never really approved of Peters, though she's willing to use him when necessary. Early 30's.

'BOB HUDSON: Roughneck father of the missing child, Angie. Motor mechanic and could earn a good living at it but likes to drink too much, gamble too much ... and spoil Angie too much, to the point of neglecting Kay, his wife, and his other four children, though he'd be surprised if this was pointed out to him. Not too many brains and about as subtle as a bull-dozer. No use for Police; Takes [sic] the law into his own hands when Angie is missing and is, [sic] completely unrepentent about it. Early 30's.

'KAY HUDSON: Bob's long-suffering wife and mother of Angie. She's a quiet woman who rarely complains, battles on, apparently subjugated by Bob but showing a flash of spirit occasionally which usually surprises him. She does her best, really believing she took Bob 'for better or worse' when she married him. But the silent resentment of his obvious favouritism to Angie builds up over the years, finally bursts loose and ends in tragedy ... She's really a tragic figure, uncomplaining, dowdy. About 30.

'ANGIE HUDSON: 10-year old [sic] daughter of the Hudsons. Normal enough kid, revelling in the gifts her father showers on her and sensing that she's his favourite and that he even cares more for her than Kay.

'DOCTOR: One scene.

'BILL LEWIS: Simpson's business partner. Younger, a bit of a hustler, clean-cut type. Worries that Simpson's disappearance and subsequent bashing could affect 'The Firm'. Mid to late 20's.

'TOMMY: Kid in playground. About 10 or 11. Cheeky-faced, appealing. 3 scenes.

'2 UNIFORMED CONSTABLES'.

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1976
296
form y separately published work icon Horrie and Charlie Mark Randall , 1974 Z1938207 1974 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'HORRIE ALLEN: Late 30s - mid 40s. A big, innocent, likeable, naive, dunder-pated bear of a man. Loves Nancy, feels responsible for Charlie.

'CHARLIE ALLEN: Late 30s - early 40s. Horrie's younger brother. A smooth-talking, opportunistic, manipulating conman. Not very good at it, but thinks he's smart. Uses Horrie, but cares for him in a rough sort of way. Resents Nancy's interference. A likeable rogue until he takes things too far. Short and slight build unlike his brother. Tries to be the flashy dresser.

'NANCY HOGG: Late 30s - mid 40s. Long-suffering, mothering, but with a sense of humour and quite a bit of spirit. Loves Horrie, but is deeply hurt by what transpires.

'JACK DREWSON: Late 30s - early forties. Slick, good with words, tries to be the well-groomed, erudite, man of business. Really a cheap crook. Like a snake, dangerous when roused.

'AUBREY: A short, tubby man. Thick. Drewson's "muscle".

'RACECALLER: Voice-over only.

'BARMAN:

'LADY: Late 50s. Butch, aggressive.

'DERO: No dialogue.

'TAXI DRIVER: Actual.

'SERVICE STATION ATTENDANT #1: No dialogue.

'SERVICE STATION ATTENDANT #2: Young, obnoxiously eager.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1975
297
form y separately published work icon 1956 and All That Michael Harvey , 1975 Z1920059 1975 single work film/TV crime

The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'RICKY: A 31 year old rocker. Tall, good-looking in a lean sparse way. A dreamer, reluctant to face reality until the very last. The driver.

'CHAS: Also a 31 year old rocker. Shorter, heavier, not so good looking. Like Ricky, missed the bus in '64 when rock collapsed, but unlike Ricky, a pragmatist. The mechanic.

'CASSIE STEVENS: About 17. Pretty, little make-up. Dresses casually. Carefree, impulsive, with no past, no future, just the present. A realist in her own reality.

'HELEN: About 21. Second-year law student. Into Womens' and any other minority Rights [sic]. Confident, at times aggressive. An idealist.

'CROFT: About 28. Well groomed, fashionably dressed. Confident, easy, yet plausible. A competent salesman.

'EMPLOYER/MANAGER:/ MR. GOODISON: About 55. Soberly dressed. No nonsense type. Knows his job, probably worked his way up from the Print Shop floor. A conservative.

'SERVICE STATION PROPRIETOR: Mid 40's. Slow, easy going type, who proves too trusting.

'SKINHEAD #1 #2. Young, weazle [sic] faced, looking for action and finding it. Drives.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1976
300
form y separately published work icon Today Ends at Dawn Charles E. Stamp , 1974 Z1938215 1974 single work film/TV crime

Final episode of Division 4.


The script held in the Crawford Collection in the AFI Research Collection contains the following character notes (excluding regular characters):

'LLOYD HUGHES: 45. A quiet and respectable clerk who confesses he killed a newspaper delivery boy. Medium height. Balding slightly. Able to drive. Married to ...

'ANNIE HUGHES: 35. Not a strong woman. Her face has some of the qualities of a waif-like little girl. Small fine bone structure ... large eyes ... curly hair style. Lightly built.

'COLIN STAFFORD (COWBOY): 11 ... but undersized. He has an appealing and bright boyish face. Newspaper boy. The poor son of a widow. No dialogue.

'MRS. COLLIER: 35. Smart. Attractive. Warm. The personnel officer of a large engineering company. An able woman who knows her job thoroughly.

'JOHN WALMSLEY: 48/50. A heavily built lathe or drilling machine operator. Cheerful type. Shop steward. Outspoken. Able to drive.

'BOB DEAN: 25-ish. Machine operator. A tearaway with a bad driving record. Worried. Rough speech. Untidy. Loutish.

'MR. SADLER: 45/50. Owner of the newsagency. Plump ... active type. Standard speech.

'MRS. STAFFORD: 40-ish. Working class ... thin ... hard yakka type who looks as though she has been through the mill. The widowed mother of the dead boy.

'MAN: Middle 40's. One scene.

'THE CAR DRIVER: 40/50. He sees Mrs. Hughes in Docker Road. No dialogue. Able to drive.

'NEWSPAPER BOY #2: Young. Normal.'

Melbourne : Crawford Productions Nine Network , 1976

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Crawford Productions , 1969 .
      person or book cover
      Division 4 title screen (screen cap)
      Extent: 300x60 min. episodesp.
      Description: Produced on videotape and film; black-and-white (episodes 1-231) and colour (episodes 232-300)
      Note/s:
      • Storey notes, in contrast to Moran, that the series ran for 301 episodes, with 298x60 min. episodes, 2x90 min. episodes, and 1x120 min. episode.

Works about this Work

y separately published work icon The Writer in Australian Television History : The Crawfords Archive Catriona Mills (lead researcher), St Lucia : AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource , 2013 6955003 2013 website bibliography

The project is a collection of AustLit records based on the content of the Crawford Collection at the AFI Research Collection (AFIRC) at RMIT. A subset of the AFIRC’s main collection, the Crawford Collection contains scripts and ancillary material relating to Australian radio and television production company Crawford Productions, from the radio serials of the 1940s and 1950s to the demolition of the Box Hill studios in 2006. The Writer in Australian Television History is a collection of records for 318 episodes of Crawfords’ radio dramas and television series, spanning the period from 1953 to 1977.

y separately published work icon The Writer in Australian Television History : The Crawfords Archive Catriona Mills (lead researcher), St Lucia : AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource , 2013 6955003 2013 website bibliography

The project is a collection of AustLit records based on the content of the Crawford Collection at the AFI Research Collection (AFIRC) at RMIT. A subset of the AFIRC’s main collection, the Crawford Collection contains scripts and ancillary material relating to Australian radio and television production company Crawford Productions, from the radio serials of the 1940s and 1950s to the demolition of the Box Hill studios in 2006. The Writer in Australian Television History is a collection of records for 318 episodes of Crawfords’ radio dramas and television series, spanning the period from 1953 to 1977.

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