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Jonathan Dawson Jonathan Dawson i(A3365 works by) (a.k.a. Jonathan Dean Dawson)
Born: Established: 1941 ;
Gender: Male
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BiographyHistory

Jonathan Dawson has served as Adjunct Professor at Griffith University and Honorary Research Professor at the University of Tasmanaia. He has also been film reviewer on ABC radio, and has written a column on popular culture for the Hobart Mercury.

Most Referenced Works

Awards for Works

form y separately published work icon Division 4 ( dir. Gary Conway et. al. )agent Melbourne : Crawford Productions , 1969 Z1814717 1969 series - publisher film/TV detective crime

Division 4, which Don Storey notes in Classic Australian Television was 'the only drama series on Australian television to rival the popularity of Homicide', was created as a vehicle for Gerard Kennedy, who had risen to popularity playing the complicated enemy agent Kragg in spy-show Hunter, after Tony Ward's departure left Hunter's future in doubt.

According to Moran, in his Guide to Australian Television Series:

The series differed from Homicide in being more oriented to the situation and milieu of a suburban police station staffed by a mixture of plainclothes detectives and uniformed policemen. This kind of situation allowed Division 4 to concentrate on a range of crimes, from major ones such as murder to minor ones such as larceny.

Though set in the fictional Melbourne suburb of Yarra Central, 'Sets were constructed that were replicas of the actual St Kilda police station charge counter and CIB room, with an attention to detail that extended to having the same picture hanging on the wall', according to Storey.

Division 4 ended in 1976. Storey adds:

Division 4's axing was a dark day for Australian television, as within months the other two Crawford cop shows on rival networks, Matlock Police and Homicide, were also axed. It was widely believed, and still is, that the cancellation of the three programs was an attempt by the three commercial networks--acting in collusion--to wipe out Crawford Productions, and consequently cripple the local production industry.

1972 winner Logie Awards Best Australian Drama
1970 winner Logie Awards Best Australian Drama
Last amended 30 Jan 2004 12:46:52
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