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y separately published work icon Sister Girl : The Writings of Aboriginal Activist and Historian Jackie Huggins selected work   prose   interview   essay   biography  
Issue Details: First known date: 1998... 1998 Sister Girl : The Writings of Aboriginal Activist and Historian Jackie Huggins
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

The articles in this collection 'represent a decade of writing by Aboriginal historian and activist Jackie Huggins. These essays and interviews combine both the public and the personal in a bold trajectory tracing one Murri woman's journey towards self-discovery and human understanding...Sister Girl examines many topics, including community action, political commitment, the tradition and value of oral history, and government intervention in Aboriginal lives. It challenges accepted notions of the appropriateness of mainstream feminism in Aboriginal society and of white historians writing Indigenous history. Closer to home, there are accounts of personal achievement and family experience as she revisits the writing of Auntie Rita with her mother Rita Huggins - the inspiration for her lifework.' (Source: Back cover, 1998 UQP edition)

Notes

  • Dedication: for my mother Rita the inspiration of my life
  • Content indexing in process.

Contents

* Contents derived from the St Lucia, Indooroopilly - St Lucia area, Brisbane - North West, Brisbane, Queensland,:University of Queensland Press , 1998 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Firing on in the Mind, Jackie Huggins , single work criticism
'This article examines the life experiences of Aboriginal women domestics during the inter-war years of the the 1920s and 1930s. [...] Interviews were conducted in Brisbane in June and July 1987 with the late June Bond, Rita Huggins, Margaret Pickering and Agnes Williams of Cherbourg Aboriginal Settlement, Daphne Lavelle from Hervey Bay and Annie Hansen from Lake Nash.' (p. 3).
(p. 1-24)
Wedmedi - If Only You Knew, Jackie Huggins , single work criticism (p. 25-36)
Writing My Mother's Life, Jackie Huggins , single work criticism (p. 37-48)
But You Couldn't Possibly ...!, Jackie Huggins , single work autobiography (p. 49-57)
Are All the Women White?, Jackie Huggins , Nicola Joseph , bell hooks , single work criticism
Jackie Huggins speaks with African American writer bell hooks, with radio presenter Nicola Joseph moderating.
(p. 58-70)
Reflections on Lilith (Written in an Aboriginal framework, trying for the humour), Jackie Huggins , single work criticism (p. 71-77)
White Apron Black Hands : Aboriginal Women Domestic Servants in Queensland, Jackie Huggins , single work criticism (p. 78-82)
Respect V Political Correctness, Jackie Huggins , single work criticism (p. 83-87)
The Mothering Tongue, Jackie Huggins , single work autobiography (p. 94-98)
Oppressed but Liberated, Jackie Huggins , single work autobiography (p. 108-119)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

y separately published work icon Inscribing Difference and Resistance : Indigenous Women’s Personal Non-fiction and Life Writing in Australia and North America Martina Horáková , Czech Republic : Masaryk University Press , 2017 17204263 2017 multi chapter work criticism

'The study examines the ways in which Indigenous women’s non-fiction published in the 1990s contributed to theoretical articulations of Indigenous feminism and to a historiographic counter-discourse which has intervened into the dominant narratives of nation-building in settler colonies. Personal non-fiction and life writing by Native American authors Paula Gunn Allen and Anna Lee Walters (USA), by First Nations authors Lee Maracle and Shirley Sterling (Canada), and by Aboriginal authors Jackie Huggins and Doris Pilkington Garimara (Australia) are analyzed in detail to demonstrate how a hybrid writing style, combining scholarly criticism with auto/biography and fictionalized storytelling, is used to inscribe Indigenous women’s cultural difference, subjugated knowledges, transgenerational trauma from colonization, and resistance to forced assimilation.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

BlackWords : Writers on Identity Anita Heiss , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 3 2014; The BlackWords Essays 2015; (p. 2) The BlackWords Essays 2019;

'In the 1960s Oodgeroo Noonuccal (then Kath Walker) hit the literary limelight as Australia’s first published ‘Aboriginal poet’ and since then Aboriginal writers have used their work as a form of self-definition and to defend our rights to our identity. Many authors are inspired by the need to redress historical government definitions of Aboriginality, to reclaim pride in First Nation status, to explain the diversity of Aboriginal experience, and to demonstrate the realities and complexities of ‘being Aboriginal’ in the 21st century.'

Source: Author's introduction.

White Closets, Jangling Nerves and the Biopolitics of the Public Secret Fiona Probyn , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , June vol. 26 no. 2 2011; (p. 57-75)
'This essay attempts to outline the relationship between the 'raw nerves' that Denis Byrne describes in the epigraph above, and the cultivation of 'indifference' that Stanner identifies as being characteristic of 'European life' in Australia. Here I situate indifference as numbing the 'jangling' of 'raw nerves' and as cultivated, disseminated and feeding specific forms of public secrecy. How did the white men who enforces segregation by day and pursued Aboriginal women by night manage their 'jangling nerves, if indeed they did jangle? How did they manage to be seen and known and have their secrets kept for them, as much as by them. How did this contradiction of segregation and sexual intimacy, if indeed it is a contradiction, work, My hope is that if we can understand how the white men (and those around them), regulated these jangling nerves, then we might be able to understand the relationship between indifference, public secrecy and the biopolitical forms that Australian whiteness took in the twentieth century, and specifically in the period of assimilation, extending from the 1930s to, roughly, the end of the 1960s.' (Author's introduction p. 57)
"Once Upon a Patriachy" : Cultural Translation in the Poetry of Romaine Moreton Katherine Russo , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Partnership Id-Entities : Cultural and Literary Re-Insciption/s of the Feminine 2010; (p. 31-44)
Constructing Aboriginal and Dalit Women’s Subjectivity and Making “Difference” Speak : An Illustration through the Writings of Jackie Huggins, Kumud Pawde and Bama Maria Srinivasan , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 70 no. 3 2010; (p. 95-115)
Examines the 'construction of 'the subject' in the life-writings of Australian Aboriginal writer Jackie Huggins and the Indian Dalit writers Bama and Kumud Pawde.' (p. 95)
[Review] Jackie Huggins Aileen Moreton-Robinson , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Queensland Review , May vol. 6 no. 1 1999; (p. 85)

— Review of Sister Girl : The Writings of Aboriginal Activist and Historian Jackie Huggins Jackie Huggins , 1998 selected work prose interview essay biography
To Write Wrongs Melissa Lucashenko , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian's Review of Books , February vol. 4 no. 1 1999; (p. 18-19)

— Review of Across Country : Stories from Aboriginal Australia 1998 anthology short story ; Maybe Tomorrow Boori Pryor , Meme McDonald , 1998 single work autobiography ; Unwritten Histories Craig Cormick , 1998 selected work short story prose ; Sister Girl : The Writings of Aboriginal Activist and Historian Jackie Huggins Jackie Huggins , 1998 selected work prose interview essay biography ; Shadow Child : A Memoir of the Stolen Generation Rosalie Fraser , 1998 single work autobiography
Telling Stories of Loss, Trying to Heal Sandy Murray , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 10 July 1999; (p. 23)

— Review of Sister Girl : The Writings of Aboriginal Activist and Historian Jackie Huggins Jackie Huggins , 1998 selected work prose interview essay biography
Sister Girl Geoff Foster , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Social Alternatives , July vol. 18 no. 3 1999; (p. 80-81)

— Review of Sister Girl : The Writings of Aboriginal Activist and Historian Jackie Huggins Jackie Huggins , 1998 selected work prose interview essay biography
Mixing It Barbara Milech , Darlene Oxenham , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Women's Book Review , vol. 11 no. 1999; (p. 10-13)

— Review of Sister Girl : The Writings of Aboriginal Activist and Historian Jackie Huggins Jackie Huggins , 1998 selected work prose interview essay biography ; Miles of Post and Wire 1998 single work life story ; Indigenous Australian Voices : A Reader 1998 anthology extract poetry criticism autobiography prose short story
Excerpt from 'Oppressed but Liberated' Jackie Huggins , 1998 extract autobiography (Oppressed but Liberated)
— Appears in: The Australian Journal of Indigenous Education , September vol. 26 no. 2 1998; (p. 44-46)
Negotiating Subjectivity : Indigenous Feminist Praxis and the Politics of Aboriginality in Alexis Wright’s Plains of Promise and Melissa Lucashenko’s Steam Pigs Tomoko Ichitani , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010; (p. 185-202)
Constructing Aboriginal and Dalit Women’s Subjectivity and Making “Difference” Speak : An Illustration through the Writings of Jackie Huggins, Kumud Pawde and Bama Maria Srinivasan , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 70 no. 3 2010; (p. 95-115)
Examines the 'construction of 'the subject' in the life-writings of Australian Aboriginal writer Jackie Huggins and the Indian Dalit writers Bama and Kumud Pawde.' (p. 95)
"Once Upon a Patriachy" : Cultural Translation in the Poetry of Romaine Moreton Katherine Russo , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Partnership Id-Entities : Cultural and Literary Re-Insciption/s of the Feminine 2010; (p. 31-44)
White Closets, Jangling Nerves and the Biopolitics of the Public Secret Fiona Probyn , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , June vol. 26 no. 2 2011; (p. 57-75)
'This essay attempts to outline the relationship between the 'raw nerves' that Denis Byrne describes in the epigraph above, and the cultivation of 'indifference' that Stanner identifies as being characteristic of 'European life' in Australia. Here I situate indifference as numbing the 'jangling' of 'raw nerves' and as cultivated, disseminated and feeding specific forms of public secrecy. How did the white men who enforces segregation by day and pursued Aboriginal women by night manage their 'jangling nerves, if indeed they did jangle? How did they manage to be seen and known and have their secrets kept for them, as much as by them. How did this contradiction of segregation and sexual intimacy, if indeed it is a contradiction, work, My hope is that if we can understand how the white men (and those around them), regulated these jangling nerves, then we might be able to understand the relationship between indifference, public secrecy and the biopolitical forms that Australian whiteness took in the twentieth century, and specifically in the period of assimilation, extending from the 1930s to, roughly, the end of the 1960s.' (Author's introduction p. 57)
Last amended 10 Sep 2021 07:15:50
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