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Issue Details: First known date: 1993... 1993 Reflections on Lilith (Written in an Aboriginal framework, trying for the humour)
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Notes

  • Author's note [in Sister Girl]: Over the years I have attended numerous conferences where the mandatory requirement has been a conference paper. A paper called 'Defying the Ethnographic Ventriloquists' was delivered by Kay Saunders and myself at Melbourne University at the Lilith Conference. Instant relief came after presenting it and this time I was caught up with some feelings still unresolved which I had to let go of. After an almost sleepless night I attempted to get rid of the gripping sensation that was overtaking me. 'Reflections', written in 1993, was just that, a long hard look at life and the emotions of being an Indigenous person.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Lilith no. 8 1993 Z1796655 1993 periodical issue 1993
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Sister Girl : The Writings of Aboriginal Activist and Historian Jackie Huggins Jackie Huggins , St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1998 Z215395 1998 selected work prose interview essay biography (taught in 4 units) The articles in this collection 'represent a decade of writing by Aboriginal historian and activist Jackie Huggins. These essays and interviews combine both the public and the personal in a bold trajectory tracing one Murri woman's journey towards self-discovery and human understanding...Sister Girl examines many topics, including community action, political commitment, the tradition and value of oral history, and government intervention in Aboriginal lives. It challenges accepted notions of the appropriateness of mainstream feminism in Aboriginal society and of white historians writing Indigenous history. Closer to home, there are accounts of personal achievement and family experience as she revisits the writing of Auntie Rita with her mother Rita Huggins - the inspiration for her lifework.' (Source: Back cover, 1998 UQP edition) St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1998 pg. 71-77
Last amended 5 Aug 2011 12:09:56
71-77 Reflections on Lilith (Written in an Aboriginal framework, trying for the humour)small AustLit logo
Reflections on Lilith (Written in an Aboriginal framework, trying for the humour)small AustLit logo Lilith
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