AustLit logo
image of person or book cover 7114892919044045972.jpg
Source: ebay
y separately published work icon The Undying single work   novel   fantasy   horror  
Is part of Master of the Ghost Dreaming Mudrooroo , 1991 series - author novel (number 2 in series)
Issue Details: First known date: 1998... 1998 The Undying
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'A daring and thrilling journey into a fantastic world of shamans, vampires and werebears, where Aboriginal Dreaming and Gothic horror are woven together to create a powerful and seamless narrative' (www.goodreads.com), a schooner of Aborigines fleeing colonial Tasmania encounter a vampire who haunts their flight, and infects several of their number (Jason Nahrung, 'Vampires in the Sunburnt Country,' 2007, p.56).

Notes

  • Book 2 of the Master of the Ghost Dreaming series and the first of the what is sometimes referred to as Mudrooroo's vampire trilogy (also comprising Underground and The Promised Land).

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Pymble, Turramurra - Pymble - St Ives area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Angus and Robertson , 1998 .
      image of person or book cover 7114892919044045972.jpg
      Source: ebay
      Extent: 202p.
      ISBN: 020719744X

Other Formats

  • Also braille and sound recording.

Works about this Work

An Odyssey into the "Black Pacific" : A Reassessment of Mudrooroo's 'The Undying' Laura Singeot , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Commonwealth Essays and Studies , vol. 37 no. 1 2014; (p. 89-99)
'The aim of this article is to reexamine Mudrooroo's novel 'The Undying' (1998) through the prism of the concept of "black Atlantic" which I borrow from Gilroy and propose to transpose to a "black Pacific." This paradigm shift has the potential to eschew the pitfall of a bifocal approach (black v. white) and to take into consideration a larger and more complex set of cultural coordinates which have had an impact on the shaping of Aboriginal identity.' (Publication abstract)
Reading Australia from Distant Shores Jennifer Wawrzinek , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 28 no. 1 2014; (p. 18-22, 257)
'A a doctoral candidate working in Australian Studies, Wawrzinek shares the difficulty to find quality Australian literature in Europe, particularly in Paris and in Berlin. With the increasing availability of ebooks via download,she is hoping that it will become easier to include lesser known Australian writers on reading lists in the European university and to access material that otherwise takes months to arrive via conventional methods of transportation. She says a sustained, ongoing program to support Australian authors, to speak about their work, and to engage in collaborative programs with European scholars and artists is needed to show the world that Australia is not just about Kangaroos and beautiful beaches.' (Publication summary)
Writing Indigenous Vampires : Aboriginal Gothic or Aboriginal Fantastic? Bruno Starrs , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: M/C Journal , August vol. 17 no. 4 2014;
'The usual postmodern suspicions about diligently deciphering authorial intent or stridently seeking fixed meaning/s and/or binary distinctions in an artistic work aside, this self-indulgent essay pushes the boundaries regarding normative academic research, for it focusses on my own (minimally celebrated) published creative writing’s status as a literary innovation. Dedicated to illuminating some of the less common denominators at play in Australian horror, my paper recalls the creative writing process involved when I set upon the (arrogant?) goal of creating a new genre of creative writing: that of the ‘Aboriginal Fantastic’. I compare my work to the literary output of a small but significant group (2.5% of the population), of which I am a member: Aboriginal Australians. I narrow my focus even further by examining that creative writing known as Aboriginal horror. And I reduce the sample size of my study to an exceptionally small number by restricting my view to one type of Aboriginal horror literature only: the Aboriginal vampire novel, a genre to which I have contributed professionally with the 2011 paperback and 2012 e-book publication of That Blackfella Bloodsucka Dance! However, as this paper hopefully demonstrates, and despite what may be interpreted by some cynical commentators as the faux sincerity of my taxonomic fervour, Aboriginal horror is a genre noteworthy for its instability and worthy of further academic interrogation.' (Introduction)
Transnational Impulses as Simulation in Colin Johnson’s (Mudrooroo’s) Fiction Clare Archer-Lean , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Transnational Literature , May vol. 5 no. 2 2013;
Postcolonial Vampires in the Indigenous Imagination : Philip McLaren and Drew Hayden Taylor Maureen Clark , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Transnational and Postcolonial Vampires : Dark Blood 2013; (p. 121-137)
Fantastic Results Bill Perrett , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 11-12 April 1998; (p. 11)

— Review of Land of the Golden Clouds Archie Weller , 1998 single work novel ; The Undying Mudrooroo , 1998 single work novel
Books in Brief John Muk Muk Burke , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian's Review of Books , April vol. 3 no. 3 1998; (p. 28)

— Review of The Undying Mudrooroo , 1998 single work novel
A Melding of Mythologies Tim Bowers , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 9 May 1998; (p. 22)

— Review of The Undying Mudrooroo , 1998 single work novel
An Epic from the Spin Doctor David English , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , July no. 202 1998; (p. 18-19)

— Review of The Undying Mudrooroo , 1998 single work novel
Untitled Bill Congreve , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Aurealis : Australian Fantasy & Science Fiction , no. 22 1999; (p. 99-100)

— Review of The Undying Mudrooroo , 1998 single work novel
'I, the Undying' : The Vampire of Subjectivity and the Aboriginal 'I' Wendy Pearson , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mongrel Signatures : Reflections on the Work of Mudrooroo 2003; (p. 185-202)
Remastering the Ghosts : Mudrooroo and Gothic Refigurations Gerry Turcotte , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mongrel Signatures : Reflections on the Work of Mudrooroo 2003; (p. 129-151)
Terror as White Female in Mudrooroo's Vampire Trilogy Maureen Clark , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Journal of Commonwealth Literature , vol. 41 no. 2 2006; (p. 121-138)
'The article reads the trilogy mainly through Barbara Creed's theorization of the monstrous feminine and examines the ways in which Mudrooroo presents his post-conquest female vampire as castrating and all-consuming. It also argues that it is possible to see Mudrooroo's female monster as a textual representation of the legendary soulless mother who would devour her own son to feed her sense of self and reality - with all the connotations of the author's descredited claim to Aboriginal identity this implies.'
Vampiric Decolonization : Fanon, 'Terrorism,' and Mudrooroo's Vampire Trilogy Gerry Turcotte , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Whiteness : A Critical Reader on Race and Empire 2005; (p. 103-118)
Metamorphic Bodies and Mongrel Subjectivities in Mudrooroo's The Undying Annalisa Oboe , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Bodies and Voices : The Force-Field of Representation and Discourse in Colonial and Post-Colonial Studies 2008; (p. 225-235)
Last amended 21 Oct 2016 14:29:11
X