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y separately published work icon Land of the Golden Clouds single work   novel   fantasy  
Issue Details: First known date: 1998... 1998 Land of the Golden Clouds
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Three thousand years after a devastating global thermonuclear war, the desolate wastes of Australia support a myriad of primitive tribal nations, bound by superstition and xenophobia. Legend says the world was destroyed by the fiery love of Sister Sun, who betrayed her husband, Father Moon, to have an illicit affair with her own sister. Young Ilgar of the nomadic Ilkari is a Moon-talker, a sort of shaman whose nocturnal visions carry prophetic messages from Father Moon. Returning home after a particularly troubling vision, Ilgar and his friends are attacked by Nightstalkers, the cold, pale People of the Caves who only come out to hunt at night. Ilgar survives with the help of S'shony, a young Nightstalker female who's grown disillusioned with her race and longs for a richer life. Quickly the two fall in love, and Ilgar takes S'shony with him, disguising her as one of the mythical Children of Father Moon. After learning of the attack, Ilgar's tribe sends him off with S'shony and a few others to gather an army from all the tribes to destroy the Nightstalkers once and for all'.

Source: bookseller's website.

Exhibitions

17203408
8875768
8857854

Australian Popular Medievalism

Australian Popular Medievalism logo
This text has been selected for the Australian Popular Medievalism dataset.
Reference: Indirect
Importance: Low
Note: Indigenous SF. The publisher has listed it as "in the spirit of The Lord of the Rings"

Notes

  • Dedication: I dedicate this book to Claire-Louise, who put up with the writer's temperament and kept me company during the hard times, and to James Ricketson, in whose house I first thought of the idea and where the waves of Palm Beach helped formulate those ideas.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • St Leonards, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Allen and Unwin , 1998 .
      image of person or book cover 7382173025894326562.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: xi, 378pp.
      Description: illus., port.
      Reprinted: 1999
      ISBN: 1864483385
Alternative title: Der Mondredner
Language: German

Other Formats

  • Also sound recording.

Works about this Work

A Climate of Hope Bill Ashcroft , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Le Simplegadi , November vol. 17 no. 2017; (p. 19-34)

Postcolonial ecocriticism has emerged gradually over the last couple of decades as the differences between postcolonialism and environmentalism have been overcome. Those differences have centred on an assumed conflict in the way the two discourses see the world. However, the colonial roots of environmental degradation and the growing postcolonial critique of the effects of imperialism have seen a growing alliance focused in the discipline of postcolonial ecocriticism. Postcolonial critique and environmentalism have found common interest in the role of imperialism and capitalism in the rapidly degrading anthropocene. However critique has not often led to a clear vision of a possible world. This paper suggests a new alliance – between postcolonial critique, environmentalism and utopianism – one that emerges from the postcolonial realisation the no transformation can occur without the hope inspired by a vision of the future. The paper asks what literature can do in an environmental struggle in which colonized peoples environmental struggle in which colonized peoples are among the worst affected. The role of postcolonial literature provides a model for the transformative function of the creative spirit in political resistance. No true resistance can succeed without a vision of change and literature provides the most powerful location of that vision – no transformation can occur unless it is first imagined.

Land of the Golden Clouds : An Epic Space of Science Fantasy and Fantastika Iva Polak , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Futuristic Worlds in Australian Aboriginal Fiction 2017; (p. 135-158)

'Archie Weller’s Land of the Golden Clouds (1998) might have become a landmark novel. Van Ikin wrote in his early review of the work that it “could go ballistic. Not just in Australia, either: there are elements of Land of the Golden Clouds that have the potential to strike a chord of excitement right across the globe” (“Feet into fantasy” 10), because Weller’s novel adds a contemporary spin to the conventions laid down by Tolkien and his successors. Katharine England ended her review of the novel with the sentiment that it was “another Archie Weller landmark in Australian and Aboriginal writing” (42). However, instead of becoming a landmark work, the novel was soon forgotten. However, instead of becoming a landmark work, the novel was soon forgotten. Chapter 1 discusses how the “spectres” started “haunting” Australia, and how extratextual phenomena provided answers as to whether or not some works should be considered Aboriginal. This phenomenon went into overdrive in 1990s Australia when a series of writers entered the limelight for their culturally incorrect appropriation of Aboriginal identity, which they used to create works of art, most notably Aboriginal writing. The publicly exposed authors who abused Aboriginal and other ethnic identities were initially put in the same box of frauds, and Australian media and academia ostracised them without paying much attention to their differences. Indeed, the number of literary-cultural hoaxes in 1990s Australia was staggering, and it is no wonder they all received the same negative response. No other western-style democracy with indigenous peoples recorded such a situation in the late twentieth century. The idea that Aboriginal oral narratives, Aboriginal art in general and Aboriginal noms de plume could still be appropriated so easily in a multicultural country that wanted to put its colonial past behind it just added to the already historically and politically charged relationship between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians. However, the subsequent careers of the “cultural hoaxers” reveal that the reasons behind their appropriations and the socio-historical context from which they appeared were quite different.'  (Introduction)

The Fantastic as a Terminological Trickster Iva Polak , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Futuristic Worlds in Australian Aboriginal Fiction 2017; (p. 41-70)

'In the opening pages of The Fantastic: A Structural Approach to a Literary Genre (1973), Todorov evokes the image of a tiger to draw a parallel between changes in the biological and literary “species”:

Being familiar with the species tiger, we can deduce from it the properties of each individual tiger; the birth of a new tiger does not modify the species in its definition. […] The same is not the case in the realm of art or of science. Here evolution operates with an altogether different rhythm: every work modifies the sum of possible works, each new example alters the species. (6)'  (Introduction)

Constructing a Postcolonial Zone : The Example of Australia Brian Attebery , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Stories about Stories : Fantasy and the Remaking of Myth 2013;

'In Australia, where the oppression of native peoples and cultures was, if anything, even more severe than in North America, it has been harder to create contact zones, and, as discussed in chapter 5, attempts by white writers such as Patricia Wrightson to blend their traditions with those of indigenous Australians have been met with suspicion or hostility. Non-Aboriginal writers from Australia have generated such a collection of ignorant, patronizing, and demeaning texts about Aborigines that some of the latter want to call a halt to any further attempts. As the novelist Melissa Lucashenko says, "Who asked you to write about Aboriginal people? If it wasn't Aboriginal people themselves, I suggest you go away and look at your own lives instead of ours. We are tired of being the freak show of Australian popular culture" (quoted in Heiss 10). Whereas American writers often treated native cultures as noble, if doomed, and Indian characters as heroic adversaries or guides to the white hero (as in James Fenimore Cooper Leatherstocking series), early depictions of Aboriginal people at best treat them as part of the landscape and at worst—and there is a pretty clear worst in Austyn Granville lost-world romance The Fallen Race (1892)—as subhuman.' (Introduction)

(Re)Writing the End of the World : Apocalypse, Race, and Indigenous Literature Roslyn Weaver , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Apocalypse in Australian Fiction and Film : A Critical Study 2011; (p. 135-158)
'This chapter addresses apocalyptic writing in the context of race, and specifically authors who rewrite Australian history as apocalypse to represent the impact of white colonization on Indigenous peoples. The disaster scenarios of apocalypse can allow minority groups to invent a new world in which to challenge and change dominant cultural constructions for widely differing agendas. The apocalyptic paradigm of revelation and disaster can work effectively to interrogate the history of colonization and relations between white and Indigenous Australians.' (136)
Books in Brief Craig Cormick , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Blast , Winter no. 37 1998; (p. 25-26)

— Review of Land of the Golden Clouds Archie Weller , 1998 single work novel ; Ghosts of a Lost World Mark Uhlmann , 1998 selected work short story ; Mr Darwin's Shooter Roger McDonald , 1998 single work novel ; Secret Men's Business : Manhood : The Big Gig John Marsden , 1998 single work non-fiction ; Everything I Know About Writing John Marsden , 1993 single work criticism
On Firm Ground Katharine England , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 27 February 1999; (p. 25)

— Review of Across Country : Stories from Aboriginal Australia 1998 anthology short story ; Land of the Golden Clouds Archie Weller , 1998 single work novel ; Underground Mudrooroo , 1999 single work novel
Aboriginal Fantasy Katharine England , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , April no. 199 1998; (p. 41-42)

— Review of Land of the Golden Clouds Archie Weller , 1998 single work novel
Fantastic Results Bill Perrett , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 11-12 April 1998; (p. 11)

— Review of Land of the Golden Clouds Archie Weller , 1998 single work novel ; The Undying Mudrooroo , 1998 single work novel
Feet First into Fantasy Van Ikin , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 15 March 1998; (p. 10)

— Review of Land of the Golden Clouds Archie Weller , 1998 single work novel
Nightmares in the Dreamtime : On Aboriginal Australian Weird Fiction Katrin Althans , Gerry Turcotte , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australian Weird Fiction , no. 2 2008; (p. 163-171)
This article takes the form of a symposium where Aboriginal authors and works in the genre of weird fiction are discussed. Critics Katrin Althans and Gerry Turcotte answer several questions posed by Studies in Australian Weird Fiction and provide fans of the genre with personal insights and interpretations never before discussed.
(Re)Writing the End of the World : Apocalypse, Race, and Indigenous Literature Roslyn Weaver , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Apocalypse in Australian Fiction and Film : A Critical Study 2011; (p. 135-158)
'This chapter addresses apocalyptic writing in the context of race, and specifically authors who rewrite Australian history as apocalypse to represent the impact of white colonization on Indigenous peoples. The disaster scenarios of apocalypse can allow minority groups to invent a new world in which to challenge and change dominant cultural constructions for widely differing agendas. The apocalyptic paradigm of revelation and disaster can work effectively to interrogate the history of colonization and relations between white and Indigenous Australians.' (136)
Riding the Golden Clouds of a Writer's Dreams Bron Sibree , 1998 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: The Canberra Times Sunday Times , 25 January 1998; (p. 22)
Sister Sun, Brother Moon Patricia Rolfe , 1998 single work column biography
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 17 March vol. 117 no. 6114 1998; (p. 70)
The Fantastic as a Terminological Trickster Iva Polak , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Futuristic Worlds in Australian Aboriginal Fiction 2017; (p. 41-70)

'In the opening pages of The Fantastic: A Structural Approach to a Literary Genre (1973), Todorov evokes the image of a tiger to draw a parallel between changes in the biological and literary “species”:

Being familiar with the species tiger, we can deduce from it the properties of each individual tiger; the birth of a new tiger does not modify the species in its definition. […] The same is not the case in the realm of art or of science. Here evolution operates with an altogether different rhythm: every work modifies the sum of possible works, each new example alters the species. (6)'  (Introduction)

Last amended 8 Feb 2016 15:25:19
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