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Stephen Knight Stephen Knight i(A16127 works by) (a.k.a. Stephen Thomas Knight)
Also writes as: Tom Street
Born: Established: 1940
c
United Kingdom (UK),
c
Western Europe, Europe,
;
Gender: Male
Visitor assertion Arrived in Australia: 1963 Departed from Australia: 1992
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Works By

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1 Peter Corris’s Cliff Hardy Was a Genuine Australian International Crime Fiction Hero Stephen Knight , 2018 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 31 August 2018;

'By the 1970s Australian crime fiction was drifting.

'The genre had a long history, back to convict days, when it dealt with unfair convictions and brutal treatments, most famously in Marcus Clarke’s For The Term Of His Natural Life (1870-2).' (Introduction)

1 From Convicts to Contemporary Convictions – 200 Years of Australian Crime Fiction Stephen Knight , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: The Conversation , 13 July 2018;

'Most countries produce crime fiction, but the versions vary according to national self-concepts. America admires the assertive private eye, both Dashiell Hammett’s late 1920s Sam Spade and the nearly as tough modern feminists, such as Sara Paretsky. Britain prefers calm mystery-solvers, amateurs like Hercule Poirot or Lord Peter Wimsey or sensitive police like Ian Rankin’s Edinburgh-based John Rebus. The French seem to favour semi-professionals who are distinctly dissenting – in 1943 Léo Malet’s Nestor Burma stood up to Nazi occupiers nearly as overtly as to Paris criminals.'  (Introduction)

1 1 y separately published work icon Australian Crime Fiction : A 200-Year History Stephen Knight , Jefferson : McFarland and Company , 2018 14051346 2018 multi chapter work criticism

'Australian crime fiction grew from the country's modern origins as a very distant English prison. Early stories described escaped convicts becoming heroic bushrangers, or how the system maltreated mis-convicted people.

'As Australia developed, thrillers emerged about threats to the wealth of free settlers and crime among gold-seekers from England and America, and then urban crime fiction including in 1887 London's first best-seller, Fergus Hume's Melbourne-located The Mystery of a Hansom Cab.

'The genre thrived, with bush detectives like Billy Pagan and Arthur Upfield's half-Indigenous `Bony', and from the 1950s women like June Wright, Pat Flower and Patricia Carlon linked with the internationally burgeoning psychothriller. Modernity has massified the Australian form: the 1980s saw a flow of private-eye thrillers, both Aussie Marlowes and tough young women, and the crime novel thrived, long a favorite in the police-skeptical country. In the twenty-first century some authors have focused on policemen, and more on policewomen- and finally there is potent Indigenous crime fiction.

'In this book Stephen Knight, long-established as an authority on the genre and now back in Melbourne, tells in detail and with analytic coherence this story of a rich but previously little-known national crime fiction.'(Publication summary)

1 Why Did Hume's The Mystery of a Hansom Cab Move so Fast Stephen Knight , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Towards Sherlock Holmes: A Thematic History of Crime Fiction in the 19th Century World 2016; (p. 157)

'Crime fiction has many authors, very many readers, and also a number of myths. One is that the whole thing started with Poe, a view favored by those unaware of earlier authors who developed the form before the brilliant Philadelphian made myth out of mystery and detection. Another is that Raymond Chandler was a great popular private-eye author—in fact his first novel sold in sober hardback and he was always better-received among the English literati of his own origin, a context which gave class and confidence to his reshaping of Hammett's edgy populism. The myths also have it that Sara Paretsky was the first of the feminist mystery authors—in fact several others preceded her by a decade or more, but they have been effectively obscured by the firmness and flourish which in her Chandleresque way she brought to the form, or the anti-form. A negative myth is the topic of this chapter—why has no-one ever offered any explanation for the runaway success of the first novel by an author who went on to write many with nothing of the same success, who set it in far-away Melbourne, Australia, and yet saw his novel The Mystery of a Hansom Cab take London by bibliocommercial storm in very late 1887, so much so it gained the title of the first best-seller in crime fiction? Unlike Fergus Hume's more than a hundred other novels, 40 more years of mysteries and sensational stories, the book has almost always been in print, usually in a cheap format and occasionally with a short, gesturing introduction. It has been at times mentioned as a freak and very rarely described in very limited detail. There is now from the Melbourne scholar Lucy Sussex a full account of the context, production and promotion of the book, and it seems time it came in from the critical cold.' (Introduction)

1 y separately published work icon Towards Sherlock Holmes: A Thematic History of Crime Fiction in the 19th Century World Crime Fiction in the 19th Century World Stephen Knight , Jefferson : McFarland and Company , 2016 10923144 2016 multi chapter work criticism

'Crime fiction–a product of the burgeoning metropolis of the 19th century–features specialists who identify criminals to protect an anxious citizenry. Before detectives came to play the central role, the protagonists tended to be lawyers or other professionals. Major English writers like Gaskell, Dickens and Collins contributed to the genre–Fergus Hume's The Mystery of a Hansom Cab was a best-seller in 1887–and American and French authors created new forms. This book explores thematic aspects of 19th century crime fiction's complex history, including various social and gender roles between different time periods and settings, and the imperial elements that made Sherlock Holmes seem dynamically contemporary.' (Publication summary)

1 Peter Temple’s Truth and Truthfulness : “The Liquid City, the Uncertain Horizon” Stephen Knight , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 16 no. 2 2016;
'The essay first locates Temple among Australian authors and this novel among his work. It then explores meaning in the plot and structure of the novel, and next focuses on the charaterisation of the leading police detective in it, Steven Villani. A following section analyses the stylistic and tonal approaches Temple tales in this novel, and finally the essay summarises the meaning and impact of Truth.' (Publication abstract)
1 y separately published work icon The Politics of Myth Stephen Knight , Melbourne : Melbourne University Press , 2015 10688122 2015 multi chapter work criticism

'In The Politics of Myth, Stephen Knight studies nine figures still vividly alive, all of them appearing in twenty-first century film and television. Analysing how they relate to the major themes of Power, Resistance and Knowledge, he shows how fact and fiction mix to help us explore and understand the complexities of our world.

'Surprising mythic shifts occur across time. Robin Hood can be a tough anti-authoritarian, a genial aristocrat, a Saxon patriot; Queen Elizabeth I has been seen as a Protestant heroine, a love-lorn lady, even a grumpy manipulator. From Merlin's multiple manifestations and Sherlock Holmes's smoking habits to the ongoing arguments about Ned Kelly, this book explores the richness and the range of figures of myth. ' (Publication summary)

1 All Hail i "After that bigger splash,", Stephen Knight , 2014 single work poetry
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 74 no. 3 2014; (p. 181)
1 The Last Romantic : Laurie Clancy’s Nabokov Stephen Knight , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 4 2014;
'Laurie Clancy’s literary critical books appear for the most part traditional for his context. There is from 1981 a short study of Christina Stead in the Essays in Australian Literature series, and in the same year a book on Xavier Herbert in the widely-read American Twayne’s series. Another act of professional generosity to readers and his country was Laurie’s full and closely considered Reader’s Guide to Australian Fiction of 1992.' (Author's introduction)
1 When Earth Cries Out : Telling Workers' Struggles Stephen Knight , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Telling Stories : Australian Life and Literature 1935–2012 2013; (p. 133-138)
1 ‘The Liquid City, the Uncertain Horizon’ : Peter Temple’s Truth and Truthfulness Stephen Knight , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Australia 2013-;

'Australians have always been welcoming to crime fiction (Knight, Continent of Mystery, ‘Origins and Sins’ 10–57). Bushranger ballads and squatter thrillers explored varied early wrongs, and rights; Victoria had two of the world’s first women crime writers, Ellen Davitt with Force and Fraud (1865) and Mary Fortune, whose many stories from 1866 often featured the detective skills of mounted trooper Mark Sinclair. Major authors Marcus Clarke and ‘Rolf Boldrewood’ published crime-related novels and Fergus Hume’s The Mystery of a Hansom Cab (1886), set and first published in Melbourne, became London’s first best-selling crime novel.' (Introduction)

1 Stephen Knight on Michael Duke Detective Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte : His Life and Times; Kees de Hoog and Carol Hetherington (eds) Investigating Arthur Upfield : A Centenary Collection of Critical Essays Stephen Knight , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: The Newtown Review of Books , June 2012;

— Review of Detective Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte: His Life and Times Michael Duke , 2010 single work criticism ; Investigating Arthur Upfield : A Centenary Collection of Critical Essays 2012 anthology criticism
1 Mysteries Across the World : Donald Cameron's The Mysteries of Melbourne Life Stephen Knight , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Mysteries of the Cities: Urban Crime Fiction in the Nineteenth Century 2012; (p. 182-204)
1 1 y separately published work icon The Mysteries of the Cities: Urban Crime Fiction in the Nineteenth Century Stephen Knight , Jefferson : McFarland and Company , 2012 Z1872086 2012 multi chapter work criticism 'A popular crime genre in the nineteenth century, urban mysteries have largely been ignored ever since. This historical and critical text examines the origins of the innovative genre, which sought to grapple with the rise of enormous, anonymous cities, beginning in France in 1842, then spreading rapidly across the continent and into America and Australia' (Provided by publisher).
1 Villainy at All Angles Stephen Knight , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: The Saturday Age , 11 February 2012; (p. 26)

— Review of Comeback Peter Corris , 2012 single work novel ; The Colonial Queen Peter Corris , 2011 single work novel ; Mad Dog : William Cyril Moxley and the Moorebank Killings Peter Corris , 2011 single work biography
1 Peter Temple: Australian Crime Fiction on the World Stage Stephen Knight , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Clues : A Journal of Detection , Spring vol. 29 no. 1 2011; (p. 71-81)
Australian crime fiction has long-standing local success, but limited international impact. Peter Temple has gone further both through his innate skills and because he has meshed Australian anti-authoritarianism and landscape-linked writing with interrogative approaches like that of James Ellroy. This occurs in the Jack Irish series, but more powerfully in some of his nonseries novels that lead up to the worldwide successes of The Broken Shore and Truth (Editor's abstract).
1 Poetry and Gore and More : Peter Temple and Australian Crime Fiction Stephen Knight , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Arena Magazine , August-September no. 107 2010; (p. 37-41)
1 Our Dark Materials Stephen Knight , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Age , 20 June 2009; (p. 26-27)
An overview of Australian crime fiction from 1988 to 2009.
1 Dog Detectives Lead the Pack Stephen Knight , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 2 May 2009; (p. 27)

— Review of The Unscratchables Anthony O'Neill , 2009 single work novel
1 Bush Hauntings Stephen Knight , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 2 May no. 5483 2008; (p. 21)

— Review of The Lost Dog Michelle De Kretser , 2007 single work novel
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