AustLit logo
Issue Details: First known date: 2018... 2018 From Convicts to Contemporary Convictions – 200 Years of Australian Crime Fiction
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Most countries produce crime fiction, but the versions vary according to national self-concepts. America admires the assertive private eye, both Dashiell Hammett’s late 1920s Sam Spade and the nearly as tough modern feminists, such as Sara Paretsky. Britain prefers calm mystery-solvers, amateurs like Hercule Poirot or Lord Peter Wimsey or sensitive police like Ian Rankin’s Edinburgh-based John Rebus. The French seem to favour semi-professionals who are distinctly dissenting – in 1943 Léo Malet’s Nestor Burma stood up to Nazi occupiers nearly as overtly as to Paris criminals.'  (Introduction)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Last amended 13 Jul 2018 06:58:02
https://theconversation.com/friday-essay-from-convicts-to-contemporary-convictions-200-years-of-australian-crime-fiction-98845?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20July%2013%202018%20-%20106269416&utm_content=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20July%2013%202018%20-%20106269416+CID_7981d59819b0ed6731891366a2cfd6c9&utm_source=campaign_monitor&utm_term=Friday%20essay%20from%20convicts%20to%20contemporary%20convictions%20%20200%20years%20of%20Australian%20crime%20fiction From Convicts to Contemporary Convictions – 200 Years of Australian Crime Fictionsmall AustLit logo The Conversation
X