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y separately published work icon Australian Crime Fiction : A 200-Year History multi chapter work   criticism  
Issue Details: First known date: 2018... 2018 Australian Crime Fiction : A 200-Year History
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Australian crime fiction grew from the country's modern origins as a very distant English prison. Early stories described escaped convicts becoming heroic bushrangers, or how the system maltreated mis-convicted people.

'As Australia developed, thrillers emerged about threats to the wealth of free settlers and crime among gold-seekers from England and America, and then urban crime fiction including in 1887 London's first best-seller, Fergus Hume's Melbourne-located The Mystery of a Hansom Cab.

'The genre thrived, with bush detectives like Billy Pagan and Arthur Upfield's half-Indigenous `Bony', and from the 1950s women like June Wright, Pat Flower and Patricia Carlon linked with the internationally burgeoning psychothriller. Modernity has massified the Australian form: the 1980s saw a flow of private-eye thrillers, both Aussie Marlowes and tough young women, and the crime novel thrived, long a favorite in the police-skeptical country. In the twenty-first century some authors have focused on policemen, and more on policewomen- and finally there is potent Indigenous crime fiction.

'In this book Stephen Knight, long-established as an authority on the genre and now back in Melbourne, tells in detail and with analytic coherence this story of a rich but previously little-known national crime fiction.'(Publication summary)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Jefferson, North Carolina,
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      McFarland and Company ,
      2018 .
      image of person or book cover 2918841772270052966.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 269p.
      Note/s:
      • Publication date 02 July 2018

      ISBN: 9781476670867

Works about this Work

From Convicts to Contemporary Convictions – 200 Years of Australian Crime Fiction Stephen Knight , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: The Conversation , 13 July 2018;

'Most countries produce crime fiction, but the versions vary according to national self-concepts. America admires the assertive private eye, both Dashiell Hammett’s late 1920s Sam Spade and the nearly as tough modern feminists, such as Sara Paretsky. Britain prefers calm mystery-solvers, amateurs like Hercule Poirot or Lord Peter Wimsey or sensitive police like Ian Rankin’s Edinburgh-based John Rebus. The French seem to favour semi-professionals who are distinctly dissenting – in 1943 Léo Malet’s Nestor Burma stood up to Nazi occupiers nearly as overtly as to Paris criminals.'  (Introduction)

From Convicts to Contemporary Convictions – 200 Years of Australian Crime Fiction Stephen Knight , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: The Conversation , 13 July 2018;

'Most countries produce crime fiction, but the versions vary according to national self-concepts. America admires the assertive private eye, both Dashiell Hammett’s late 1920s Sam Spade and the nearly as tough modern feminists, such as Sara Paretsky. Britain prefers calm mystery-solvers, amateurs like Hercule Poirot or Lord Peter Wimsey or sensitive police like Ian Rankin’s Edinburgh-based John Rebus. The French seem to favour semi-professionals who are distinctly dissenting – in 1943 Léo Malet’s Nestor Burma stood up to Nazi occupiers nearly as overtly as to Paris criminals.'  (Introduction)

Last amended 7 Jun 2018 12:11:23
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