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y separately published work icon Lionel Fogarty : Selected Poems 1980-2017 selected work   poetry  
Issue Details: First known date: 2017... 2017 Lionel Fogarty : Selected Poems 1980-2017
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Prahran, South Yarra - Glen Iris area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Re.Press , 2017 .
      image of person or book cover 7324297120745946782.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 1v.p.
      Note/s:
      • Launched 23 June 2017.

      ISBN: 9780992373436, 0992373433

Works about this Work

‘The Rally Is Calling’ : Dashiell Moore Interviews Lionel Fogarty Dashiell Moore (interviewer), 2019 single work interview
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , 1 February no. 89 2019;

'The poetry of Yoogum and Kudjela man, Lionel Fogarty, may be hard to follow, often distorting colloquial phrases or standardised grammar to retool the colonising English language into a form of resistance. His description of it here as ‘double-standard English’ conveys Fogarty’s intent to demonstrate how the English language can oppress Aboriginal peoples, forcing non-Indigenous readers to experience what it feels like to be alienated by a literary text. These actions have led Ali Alizadeh to describe his poetry as an expression of his ‘staunchly decolonised, Aboriginal identity’. I would argue that to read Fogarty is not to be positioned as an outsider, but rather to be given the challenge to conceptualise new reading methods as he positions us in a world estranged from itself.'  (Introduction)

Dashiell Moore Reviews Lionel Fogarty Dashiell Moore , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , 1 March no. 85 2018;

'To begin this review, I would like to make the most important of declarations and acknowledge the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation as the traditional owners of the land on which this review was written; and would like to thank Narungga scholar, writer and poet Natalie Harkin for having assisted in the editorial process. I would also like to acknowledge and pay respects to Lionel Fogarty, the Yoogum language group from South Brisbane, and the Kidjela people of North Queensland, whose inestimable linguistic, cultural and spiritual legacy is clear in Lionel Fogarty Selected Poems 1980-2017.'  (Introduction)

Dashiell Moore Reviews Lionel Fogarty Dashiell Moore , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , 1 March no. 85 2018;

'To begin this review, I would like to make the most important of declarations and acknowledge the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation as the traditional owners of the land on which this review was written; and would like to thank Narungga scholar, writer and poet Natalie Harkin for having assisted in the editorial process. I would also like to acknowledge and pay respects to Lionel Fogarty, the Yoogum language group from South Brisbane, and the Kidjela people of North Queensland, whose inestimable linguistic, cultural and spiritual legacy is clear in Lionel Fogarty Selected Poems 1980-2017.'  (Introduction)

‘The Rally Is Calling’ : Dashiell Moore Interviews Lionel Fogarty Dashiell Moore (interviewer), 2019 single work interview
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , 1 February no. 89 2019;

'The poetry of Yoogum and Kudjela man, Lionel Fogarty, may be hard to follow, often distorting colloquial phrases or standardised grammar to retool the colonising English language into a form of resistance. His description of it here as ‘double-standard English’ conveys Fogarty’s intent to demonstrate how the English language can oppress Aboriginal peoples, forcing non-Indigenous readers to experience what it feels like to be alienated by a literary text. These actions have led Ali Alizadeh to describe his poetry as an expression of his ‘staunchly decolonised, Aboriginal identity’. I would argue that to read Fogarty is not to be positioned as an outsider, but rather to be given the challenge to conceptualise new reading methods as he positions us in a world estranged from itself.'  (Introduction)

Last amended 14 Aug 2017 14:44:16
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