y Scream Black Murder single work   novel   crime  
Issue Details: First known date: 1995... 1995 Scream Black Murder
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

New Year's Day, Sydney. The bodies of a young Aboriginal woman and her boyfriend are discovered in Redfern, brutally murdered. Koori detectives Gary Leslie and Lisa Fuller, from the new Aboriginal Homicide Unit of the NSWPD, are assigned to the investigation. Both are determined to solve their first homicide quickly. Another killing and the tension rises fuelled by an increasingly frenzied media. (Source: Trove)

Notes

  • Other formats: Also sound recording.
  • Other formats: E-book (April 2013)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Pymble, Turramurra - Pymble - St Ives area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: HarperCollins , 1995 .
      Extent: 257p.
      Note/s:
      • Dedication: To my wife Roslyn my daughter Tanya and son James my (late) father, Jack and my mother, Anne my brothers, John, (late) Kevin, Roderick, Gregory, and my sisters, Elaine, Lynne.
      ISBN: 0732251427
    • Broome, Kimberley area, North Western Australia, Western Australia,: Magabala Books , 2001 .
      Image courtesy of Magabala Books
      Extent: x, 181p.p.
      Edition info: Rev. ed.
      ISBN: 1875641785

Works about this Work

Philip McLaren and the Indigenous-Australian Crime Novel Cornelis Martin Renes , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 20 2016; (p. 22-37)
'This paper locates the postcolonial crime novel as a space for disenfranchised groups to write back to the marginalisation inherent in the process of colonisation, and explores the example of Australia. From its inception in the mid-19th century, Australian crime fiction reflected upon the challenging harshness and otherness of the Australian experience for the free and convict settler, expelled from the metropole. It created a series of popular subgenres derived from the convict narrative proper, while more ‘standard’ modes of crime fiction, popularised in and through British and American crime fiction, were late to develop. Whereas Australian crime fiction has given expression to the white experience of the continent in manifold ways, up until recently it made no room for Indigenous voices – with the exception of the classic Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte series written by the prolific Arthur Upfield in the first half of the 20th century. For the longest time, this absence reflected the dispossession, dispersal and disenfranchisement of the colonised Indigenous peoples at large; there were neither Aboriginal voices nor Aboriginal authors, which made the textual space of the Australian crime novel a discursive terra nullius. This paper will look at the only Indigenous-Australian author to date with a substantial body of work in crime fiction, Philip McLaren, and elucidate how his four crime novels break new ground in Australian crime fiction by embedding themselves within a political framework of Aboriginal resilience and resistance to neo/colonialism. Written as of the 1990s, McLaren’s oeuvre is eclectic in that it does not respond to traditional formats of Australian crime fiction, shifts between generic subtypes and makes incursions into other genres. The paper concludes that McLaren’s oeuvre has not been conceived of as the work of a crime writer per se, but rather that its form and content are deeply informed by the racist violence and oppression that still affects Indigenous-Australian society today, the expression of which the crime novel is particularly well geared to.' (Publication abstract)
Exploration of Indigenous Fate in Terra Incognita : Philip McLaren's 'Scream Black Murder' Salhia Ben-Messahel , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Fact and Fiction : Readings in Australian Literature 2008; (p. 142-155)
White Form, Aboriginal Content : Philip McLaren's Scream Black Murder Sue Ryan-Fazilleau , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Commonwealth , Autumn vol. 26 no. 1 2004; (p. 41-52)
'This article studies the way in which ... McLaren exploits the conventions of this sub-genre of Western literature [i.e. crime fiction] to re-inforce the impact of his post-colonial message' (Author's abstract p.41).
Keeper of Dreams Tony Smith , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , February no. 238 2002; (p. 44)

— Review of Scream Black Murder Philip McLaren 1995 single work novel ; There'll Be New Dreams Philip McLaren 2001 single work novel ; Sweet Water : Stolen Land Philip McLaren 1993 single work novel
Aboriginal Writing Philip Morrissey , 2000 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Oxford Companion to Aboriginal Art and Culture 2000; (p. 313-320)
Black Deaths, Black Lives Stuart Coupe , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 7 October 1995; (p. 12A)

— Review of The Malcontenta Barry Maitland 1995 single work novel ; Browning Without a Cause Peter Corris 1995 single work novel ; Scream Black Murder Philip McLaren 1995 single work novel
Into the Dark, Without Fear or Favour Graeme Blundell , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 8-9 February 1997; (p. rev 9)

— Review of Bad Debts Peter Temple 1996 single work novel ; Scream Black Murder Philip McLaren 1995 single work novel ; Endpeace Jon Cleary 1996 single work novel
Suspicions of Use Jennifer Maiden , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , October no. 175 1995; (p. 66)

— Review of Scream Black Murder Philip McLaren 1995 single work novel
Mystery Explores Social Issues Jane Paznik-Bondarin , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 10 no. 1 1996; (p. 58-59)

— Review of Scream Black Murder Philip McLaren 1995 single work novel
Keeper of Dreams Tony Smith , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , February no. 238 2002; (p. 44)

— Review of Scream Black Murder Philip McLaren 1995 single work novel ; There'll Be New Dreams Philip McLaren 2001 single work novel ; Sweet Water : Stolen Land Philip McLaren 1993 single work novel
White Form, Aboriginal Content : Philip McLaren's Scream Black Murder Sue Ryan-Fazilleau , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Commonwealth , Autumn vol. 26 no. 1 2004; (p. 41-52)
'This article studies the way in which ... McLaren exploits the conventions of this sub-genre of Western literature [i.e. crime fiction] to re-inforce the impact of his post-colonial message' (Author's abstract p.41).
Exploration of Indigenous Fate in Terra Incognita : Philip McLaren's 'Scream Black Murder' Salhia Ben-Messahel , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Fact and Fiction : Readings in Australian Literature 2008; (p. 142-155)
y Philip McLaren Interviewed by Heather Rosden Heather Rusden (interviewer), Canberra : National Library of Australia , 1994 Z1710625 1994 single work interview
Aboriginal Writing Philip Morrissey , 2000 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Oxford Companion to Aboriginal Art and Culture 2000; (p. 313-320)
Philip McLaren and the Indigenous-Australian Crime Novel Cornelis Martin Renes , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 20 2016; (p. 22-37)
'This paper locates the postcolonial crime novel as a space for disenfranchised groups to write back to the marginalisation inherent in the process of colonisation, and explores the example of Australia. From its inception in the mid-19th century, Australian crime fiction reflected upon the challenging harshness and otherness of the Australian experience for the free and convict settler, expelled from the metropole. It created a series of popular subgenres derived from the convict narrative proper, while more ‘standard’ modes of crime fiction, popularised in and through British and American crime fiction, were late to develop. Whereas Australian crime fiction has given expression to the white experience of the continent in manifold ways, up until recently it made no room for Indigenous voices – with the exception of the classic Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte series written by the prolific Arthur Upfield in the first half of the 20th century. For the longest time, this absence reflected the dispossession, dispersal and disenfranchisement of the colonised Indigenous peoples at large; there were neither Aboriginal voices nor Aboriginal authors, which made the textual space of the Australian crime novel a discursive terra nullius. This paper will look at the only Indigenous-Australian author to date with a substantial body of work in crime fiction, Philip McLaren, and elucidate how his four crime novels break new ground in Australian crime fiction by embedding themselves within a political framework of Aboriginal resilience and resistance to neo/colonialism. Written as of the 1990s, McLaren’s oeuvre is eclectic in that it does not respond to traditional formats of Australian crime fiction, shifts between generic subtypes and makes incursions into other genres. The paper concludes that McLaren’s oeuvre has not been conceived of as the work of a crime writer per se, but rather that its form and content are deeply informed by the racist violence and oppression that still affects Indigenous-Australian society today, the expression of which the crime novel is particularly well geared to.' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 10 Oct 2016 12:32:12
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