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y separately published work icon Bad Debts single work   novel   crime  
Is part of Jack Irish Peter Temple , 1996 series - author novel (number 1 in series)
Issue Details: First known date: 1996... 1996 Bad Debts
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'When Jack Irish, criminal lawyer turned debt collector, receives a mysterious message from an ex-client, he is too immersed in his misery over Fitzroy's latest loss to take much notice. The next thing Jack knows, the ex-client is dead and he is drawn into a dangerous investigation.' (Publication summary)

Adaptations

form y separately published work icon Jack Irish : Bad Debts Matt Cameron , Andrew Knight , ( dir. Jeffrey Walker ) Australia : Essential Media and Entertainment ABC Television , 2012 Z1832865 2012 single work film/TV crime

'Life is hard enough for Jack - his beloved football club has moved interstate, the odds of his latest plunge at the track seem too long and he's still cooking for one. So a phone message from ex-client Danny McKillop (Simon Russell) doesn't ring any bells. But then Danny turns up dead and Jack must take a walk back into a dark and dangerous past.'

Source: http://blogs.abc.net.au/ and David Knox, 'All-Star Cast Joins Jack Irish Telemovies', 21 October 2011 (http://www.tvtonight.com.au/). (Sighted 06/01/2012)

Notes

  • Dedication : For Anita and Nicholas : true believers
  • Other formats: Also sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Pymble, Turramurra - Pymble - St Ives area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: HarperCollins , 1996 .
      Extent: 297p.
      ISBN: 0732258162 (pbk.)
    • Pymble, Turramurra - Pymble - St Ives area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: HarperCollins , 1997 .
      Extent: 297p.
      ISBN: 0732257484 (pbk.)
    • San Francisco, California,
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      MacAdam/Cage ,
      2005 .
      Extent: 318p.
      ISBN: 9781596921290, 1596921293 (p.bk)
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon The Jack Irish Quinella Peter Temple , Melbourne : Text Publishing , 2007 Z1431072 2007 selected work novel crime Melbourne : Text Publishing , 2007 pg. 314
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Quercus ,
      2007 .
      Extent: 319p.
      ISBN: 1847241549 (pbk.), 9781847241542 (pbk.)
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Bad Debts: A Jack Irish Omnibus Peter Temple , London : Quercus , 2008 Z1477500 2008 selected work novel London : Quercus , 2008
Alternative title: Kwade schuld
Language: Dutch
    • Amsterdam,
      c
      Netherlands,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      De Boekerij ,
      2002 .
      Extent: 240p.
      Note/s:
      • This translation has also been published as a selected work, and appears as Kwade Schuld in a 'DubbelRoman' (two-in-one) edition, coupled with Johnathan Evans' De Backpack-Trail (Trail of the Dead).
      ISBN: 9022532380 (pbk.)

Works about this Work

The Representation of Aboriginality in the Novels of Peter Temple Bill Phillips , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 20 2016; (p. 9-21)
'Identity politics is fraught with difficulties. Of few places is this truer than in Australia when it comes to the representation of Aboriginality. On the one hand the absence or invisibility of Aboriginality in Australian life and culture maybe interpreted as a deliberate exclusion of a people whose presence is uncomfortable or inconvenient for many Australians of immigrant origin. Equally, the representation of Aboriginality by non-Aboriginals may be seen as an appropriation of identity, an inexcusable commercial exploitation or an act of neocolonialism. Best-selling and prize-winning South African-born author Peter Temple appears to be very much aware of these pitfalls. In his crime novels, written between 1996 and 2009, he has obviously made the decision to grasp the nettle and attempt to represent Aboriginality in a way that would be as acceptable as possible. This paper traces the evolution of Temple's representation of Aboriginality through the three major Aboriginal characters present in his novels: Cameron Delray (Bad Debts, 1996; Black Tide, 1999; Dead Point, 2000; and White Dog, 2003), Ned Lowey (An Iron Rose, 1998) and Detective Sergeant Paul Dove (The Broken Shore, 2005 and Truth, 2009).' (Publication abstract)
Poetry and Gore and More : Peter Temple and Australian Crime Fiction Stephen Knight , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Arena Magazine , August-September no. 107 2010; (p. 37-41)
Mapping the Vast Suburban Tundra : Australian Comedy from Dame Edna to Kath and Kim Sue Turnbull , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: International Journal of Cultural Studies , vol. 11 no. 1 2008; (p. 15-32)

By the time of Australian Federation in 1901, almost 70 per cent of 'Sydney’s population were living in the suburbs: a statistic that suggests that despite prevalent and enduring images of the bushman and the ocker, the ‘real’ Australia was, and still is, more likely to be located in what Barry Humphries has described as Australia’s ‘vast and unexplored suburban tundra’.1 As a satirist, Humphries has been in the forefront of an expedition to map the tragi-comic dimensions of this territory with characters such as Dame Edna Everage, who first appeared on Australian television in 1956, offering the box room of ‘her lovely home’ as a potential billet for an athlete during the Melbourne Olympic Games.2 Some 50 years later, Dame Edna not only presided over the closing ceremony of the 2006 Commonwealth Games, but was joined on the steps of the Melbourne Town Hall, during a ceremony to award her the key to the city, by two more recent suburban icons, Kath and Kim. With the international success of Dame Edna and Kath and Kim, it seems that the Antipodean suburb is still being mapped and mined for comic effect on television both at home and abroad. This article will explore the conditions of such success within a long tradition of anti-suburbanism dating back to the nineteenth century while exploring the role of comedy in constructing a national imaginary which is now widely circulated via increasingly transnational flows in television.'

Source: Sage Publications.

A Nice Place to Do Crime Peter Temple , 2004-2005 single work autobiography
— Appears in: Mystery Readers Journal , Winter vol. 20 no. 4 2004-2005; (p. 39-41)
Books : Crime Ron Serdiuk , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Limelight , December 2003; (p. 62)

— Review of Bad Debts Peter Temple , 1996 single work novel
Lowlife in High Places Stephen Dedman , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The West Australian , 18 October 2003; (p. 16)

— Review of Bad Debts Peter Temple , 1996 single work novel
Books : Crime Ron Serdiuk , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Limelight , December 2003; (p. 62)

— Review of Bad Debts Peter Temple , 1996 single work novel
Great Value in First-Up Thriller Derry McCarthy , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The West Australian , 18 September 1996; (p. 7)

— Review of Bad Debts Peter Temple , 1996 single work novel
Some Feisty Pocket Rockets Katharine England , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 21 September 1996; (p. 7)

— Review of Bad Debts Peter Temple , 1996 single work novel
Playback J. R. Carroll , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , October no. 185 1996; (p. 68)

— Review of Bad Debts Peter Temple , 1996 single work novel
A Nice Place to Do Crime Peter Temple , 2004-2005 single work autobiography
— Appears in: Mystery Readers Journal , Winter vol. 20 no. 4 2004-2005; (p. 39-41)
Poetry and Gore and More : Peter Temple and Australian Crime Fiction Stephen Knight , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Arena Magazine , August-September no. 107 2010; (p. 37-41)
Are We There Yet?: The Place of Place in Australian Crime Fiction Sue Turnbull , 1999 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , vol. 58 no. 4 1999; (p. 50-60)
The Representation of Aboriginality in the Novels of Peter Temple Bill Phillips , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 20 2016; (p. 9-21)
'Identity politics is fraught with difficulties. Of few places is this truer than in Australia when it comes to the representation of Aboriginality. On the one hand the absence or invisibility of Aboriginality in Australian life and culture maybe interpreted as a deliberate exclusion of a people whose presence is uncomfortable or inconvenient for many Australians of immigrant origin. Equally, the representation of Aboriginality by non-Aboriginals may be seen as an appropriation of identity, an inexcusable commercial exploitation or an act of neocolonialism. Best-selling and prize-winning South African-born author Peter Temple appears to be very much aware of these pitfalls. In his crime novels, written between 1996 and 2009, he has obviously made the decision to grasp the nettle and attempt to represent Aboriginality in a way that would be as acceptable as possible. This paper traces the evolution of Temple's representation of Aboriginality through the three major Aboriginal characters present in his novels: Cameron Delray (Bad Debts, 1996; Black Tide, 1999; Dead Point, 2000; and White Dog, 2003), Ned Lowey (An Iron Rose, 1998) and Detective Sergeant Paul Dove (The Broken Shore, 2005 and Truth, 2009).' (Publication abstract)
Mapping the Vast Suburban Tundra : Australian Comedy from Dame Edna to Kath and Kim Sue Turnbull , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: International Journal of Cultural Studies , vol. 11 no. 1 2008; (p. 15-32)

By the time of Australian Federation in 1901, almost 70 per cent of 'Sydney’s population were living in the suburbs: a statistic that suggests that despite prevalent and enduring images of the bushman and the ocker, the ‘real’ Australia was, and still is, more likely to be located in what Barry Humphries has described as Australia’s ‘vast and unexplored suburban tundra’.1 As a satirist, Humphries has been in the forefront of an expedition to map the tragi-comic dimensions of this territory with characters such as Dame Edna Everage, who first appeared on Australian television in 1956, offering the box room of ‘her lovely home’ as a potential billet for an athlete during the Melbourne Olympic Games.2 Some 50 years later, Dame Edna not only presided over the closing ceremony of the 2006 Commonwealth Games, but was joined on the steps of the Melbourne Town Hall, during a ceremony to award her the key to the city, by two more recent suburban icons, Kath and Kim. With the international success of Dame Edna and Kath and Kim, it seems that the Antipodean suburb is still being mapped and mined for comic effect on television both at home and abroad. This article will explore the conditions of such success within a long tradition of anti-suburbanism dating back to the nineteenth century while exploring the role of comedy in constructing a national imaginary which is now widely circulated via increasingly transnational flows in television.'

Source: Sage Publications.

Last amended 6 Aug 2018 13:58:54
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