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y A Web of Friendship : Selected Letters (1928-1973) selected work   correspondence  
Issue Details: First known date: 1992... 1992 A Web of Friendship : Selected Letters (1928-1973)
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'A Web of Friendship is a collection of Christina Stead's intimate correspondence with influential literary figures such as Stanley Burnshaw, Ettore Rella, Nettie Palmer, Clem Christesen, Elizabeth Harrower and A.D. Hope.

'These letters span the life of one of Australia's most illustrious writers, offering a rare insight into the relationships that influenced and sustained her work. They reveal Stead's reflections on the art of literature, the development of her political thought, and the significance of a handful of friendships that would endure throughout her life and career.

'The letters cover Stead's arrival in England in 1928, as well as her time abroad in Europe and the United States. They also detail her marriage to William Blake, their life in England where they settled in 1953, as well as her brief return to Australia and her final years in England following Blake's death.' (Publication summary)

Contents

* Contents derived from the Victoria,: Miegunyah Press , 2017 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Introduction, Hilary McPhee , 1992 single work criticism

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Pymble, Turramurra - Pymble - St Ives area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Angus and Robertson , 1992 .
      3102888599616469284.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: xi, 497p.p.
      ISBN: 0207168881
      Series: Imprint Lives series - publisher

Works about this Work

'Christina Stead : A Web of Friendship, Selected Letters (1928–1973)' Edited by Ron Geering Graeme Powell , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , May no. 391 2017;
'In her novel Jacob’s Room (1922), Virginia Woolf wrote: ‘For centuries the writing-desk has contained sheets fit precisely for the communication of friends. Masters of language have turned from the sheet that endures to the sheet that perishes ... and addressed themselves to the task of reaching, touching, penetrating the individual heart.’ (Introduction)
The Rhetoric of Luck in Christina Stead's Letty Fox: Her Luck Fiona Morrison , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 28 no. 1 2014; (p. 111-122, 256)
'Morrison talks about the rhetoric of Luck in Christina Stead's Letty Fox: Her Luck (1946). The novel examines the terrain of female experience between the acquisition of sexual maturity and marriage. It is clear that the topoi of female survival and female ambition are central to this trilogy of books, and in Letty Fox: Her Luck, the framing questions of America and American politics complicate and extend these topoi. The anti-sentimental picaresque offered Stead an opportunity to return to the satirical energy that is so remarkable in House of All Nations (1938), to experiment with New York vernacular, and to anatomize various American dilemmas as she saw them: a materialistic and weak middle-class obsessed with easy success, the irritant of fake radicalism in the New York Left, and the irresistible rise and rise of gangster capitalism. Stead's use of "luck" highlights the episodic and contingent events that make up the life of her anti-heroine, but also provides a rhetorical focal point for her critique of sex and politics. "Luck" is a word at the heart of the novel's purpose as well as its action.' (Publication abstract)
Christina Stead's Australia - "Easily the Largest Island" Chris Williams , 1993 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: Southerly , March vol. 53 no. 1 1993; (p. 80-95)
Life-Lines in Stormy Seas: Some Recent Collections of Women's Diaries and Letters Joy W. Hooton , 1993 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 16 no. 1 1993; (p. 3-13)
Christina Stead: Loving Letters Ann Blake , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: Meridian , October vol. 11 no. 2 1992; (p. 84-86)

— Review of A Web of Friendship : Selected Letters (1928-1973) Christina Stead 1992 selected work correspondence
An Unexpected Glimpse of a Restless and Shy Author Mollie Missen , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 6 June 1992; (p. 9)

— Review of A Web of Friendship : Selected Letters (1928-1973) Christina Stead 1992 selected work correspondence ; Talking into the Typewriter : Selected Letters (1973-1983) Christina Stead 1992 selected work correspondence
A Dogged Devotion to Writing with Honesty Chris Williams , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 20 June 1992; (p. C9)

— Review of A Web of Friendship : Selected Letters (1928-1973) Christina Stead 1992 selected work correspondence ; Talking into the Typewriter : Selected Letters (1973-1983) Christina Stead 1992 selected work correspondence
An Incorrigible Wordist Shares a Bit of Her World Mary Lord , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 20-21 June 1992; (p. rev 7)

— Review of A Web of Friendship : Selected Letters (1928-1973) Christina Stead 1992 selected work correspondence ; Talking into the Typewriter : Selected Letters (1973-1983) Christina Stead 1992 selected work correspondence
The Ship of Life, Love Elizabeth Riddell , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 30 June vol. 114 no. 5826 1992; (p. 92-93)

— Review of A Web of Friendship : Selected Letters (1928-1973) Christina Stead 1992 selected work correspondence ; Talking into the Typewriter : Selected Letters (1973-1983) Christina Stead 1992 selected work correspondence
An Exile 'Deep-Bitten' by Home Wanda Jamrozik , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 27 June 1992; (p. 38)

— Review of A Web of Friendship : Selected Letters (1928-1973) Christina Stead 1992 selected work correspondence
Christina Stead's Australia - "Easily the Largest Island" Chris Williams , 1993 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: Southerly , March vol. 53 no. 1 1993; (p. 80-95)
Life-Lines in Stormy Seas: Some Recent Collections of Women's Diaries and Letters Joy W. Hooton , 1993 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 16 no. 1 1993; (p. 3-13)
The Rhetoric of Luck in Christina Stead's Letty Fox: Her Luck Fiona Morrison , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 28 no. 1 2014; (p. 111-122, 256)
'Morrison talks about the rhetoric of Luck in Christina Stead's Letty Fox: Her Luck (1946). The novel examines the terrain of female experience between the acquisition of sexual maturity and marriage. It is clear that the topoi of female survival and female ambition are central to this trilogy of books, and in Letty Fox: Her Luck, the framing questions of America and American politics complicate and extend these topoi. The anti-sentimental picaresque offered Stead an opportunity to return to the satirical energy that is so remarkable in House of All Nations (1938), to experiment with New York vernacular, and to anatomize various American dilemmas as she saw them: a materialistic and weak middle-class obsessed with easy success, the irritant of fake radicalism in the New York Left, and the irresistible rise and rise of gangster capitalism. Stead's use of "luck" highlights the episodic and contingent events that make up the life of her anti-heroine, but also provides a rhetorical focal point for her critique of sex and politics. "Luck" is a word at the heart of the novel's purpose as well as its action.' (Publication abstract)
'Christina Stead : A Web of Friendship, Selected Letters (1928–1973)' Edited by Ron Geering Graeme Powell , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , May no. 391 2017;
'In her novel Jacob’s Room (1922), Virginia Woolf wrote: ‘For centuries the writing-desk has contained sheets fit precisely for the communication of friends. Masters of language have turned from the sheet that endures to the sheet that perishes ... and addressed themselves to the task of reaching, touching, penetrating the individual heart.’ (Introduction)
Last amended 16 Mar 2017 11:41:24
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