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y separately published work icon Westerly periodical issue   peer reviewed assertion
Issue Details: First known date: 2017... vol. 62 no. 2 2017 of Westerly est. 1956 Westerly
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Since its infancy, Westerly has a had a long interest in the literatures and cultures of the Indian Ocean, Southern and eastern Asia. Poised on the west coast, we are constantly looking out, facing away from mainland Australia. This space is not an empty one. It is rich with a history of movement and exchange, going back (as Sarah Ridhuan's essay in this issue reminds us) well beyond Australia's colonisation.' (Editorial introduction)

Contents

* Contents derived from the 2017 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
A Mirror in the Dark, Ella Jeffery , single work criticism

'People always used to tell me 'Shanghai's not real China'. I heard it from locals, from expats like myself, from visitors who had spent a week or two In Xi'an or Chongqing or Lijiang and thought they should advise me That I  wasn't getting the real deal. What they wanted me to knew was that Shanghai, a hub of foreign trade and business, with some of its central districts full of stores like Nike and H&M, was not enough. It was too much like home and not enough like what a foreigner should experience in China.'(Introduction)
 

(p. 9-20)
The Home of Lost Angels, Mohammed Massoud Morsi , single work prose

I remember there was a backdrop of colossal nimbus clouds shifting They were painting shifting colours of the dissappearing sun. Lightning bolts  discharged themselves through their mass and in the narrow gap  separating them from the ocean, threads of light crossed in a stitching pattern. A feint rumble hummed across a mirror-cairn sea as her fingers caressed the palm of my hand. With every flash she would gently move them, barely touching my skin. Heavy raindrops fell in slow motion. I felt  her breath on my face as she turned towards me. A series of blight flashes lit the sky like a strobe light. Her irises were round and large and black. Strands of her hair tickled my face. We stared into each other. Closer again. Between every flash there was only our breath,the drumming of scattered drops and an increasingly loud rumble. We became so close we were breathing each other. Another bright flash. Close enough to make us both twitch. Our lips touched, just. As the giant cloud fed on hot moisture, it freed a windshear of cold air which swept across the ocean and up the mountainside to reach us. We nudged closer. Our lips touched again and stayed touching. The drumming intensified. And in the flash that followed our eyes were one. Her fingers stopped moving in my palm. ' (Introduction)
 

(p. 65-75)
Pinggiri"apa arti nya hidup sekejap saja", Reneé Pettitt-Schipp , single work poetry (p. 76)
Weaving Ketupat on Pulu Cheploki"the neneks are starting to weave", Reneé Pettitt-Schipp , single work poetry (p. 77)
Ociania as I Imagined Iti"at my kitchen island bench (in Perth, Australia)", Ross Jackson , single work poetry (p. 86)
'A Transfiguration of My Local Patriotism' : Christina Stead, the Figure of Oceanic Totality and 'A Night on the Indian Ocean', Fiona Morrison , single work criticism

'In a late interview with Rodney Wetherell (1979), when she was back in Australia and being interviewed rather more frequently in light of her rather belated status as a great Australian writer, Christina Stead found an intriguing way to deal with the equally frequent questions about the reasons for her expatriation to Europe in 1928. She implied that to be Australian was to be always already a citizen of the sea. Her conflation of national identity and the critical geographical identity of the island continent allowed her to argue that there was no especial volition to 'going abroad'. Ina sense, Stead claimed that she had an automatic 'dual citizenship' drawn from a symbiotic relationship between her marine identity and her Australian one. Of course, therefore, one would travel by sea..' (Introduction)
 

(p. 87-99)
The Blue, Katinka Smit , single work short story (p. 101-109)
Keunggulani"hot garbage and mango", Sanna Peden , single work poetry (p. 110-111)
Sitting on My Grandmother's Skirts, Caitlin Prince , single work biography (p. 112-119)
'Bending in All Directions Everywhere' : A Juddering, Glimpsing, Eidolonging of Poets, Dan Disney , Jessica Wilkinson , Cassandra Atherton , single work essay

'Deriving from the Ancient Greek etymons eidos ('form') and eido ('to see'), the modern term `'eidolon' transmutes into English in two interconnected ways: an eidolon can either be an idealised person or thing, or a spectre or phantom. In poetry, the term is often associated with Walt Whitman's poem of the same name, included in his 'Inscriptions' section of the 1881-82 edition of Leaves of Grass. In this apocryphal text, stanzas repeatedly conclude on the word 'eidolon' as if the repetitions are one means (semantic satiation) by which to challenge connections between signified and signifier. The American transcendentalist's poem offers 'a theory ; about  how a poet should handle, or mediate, form and materiality' Cohen 1), and the eidolon  remains paradoxical for Whitman, a 'spiritual image of the immatrerial' of which 'seeks to demonstrate the incompleteness of our understanding of reality' (Richardson 201)...' (Introduction)

(p. 121-133)
Yeonhuii"A pigeon is cleaning its wings", Lisa Gorton , single work poetry (p. 134-135)
Ghostini"I'm old again. At the plaza huge whimpers", Bonny Cassidy , single work poetry (p. 136)
Shieldsi"I've come for my name", Bonny Cassidy , single work poetry (p. 137)
That Winter, These Protestsi"in the banging middle of this downtowndom, a crowd", Dan Disney , single work poetry (p. 143)
Spring, Hannam-dongi"the avenues of blossom wheezing concrete", Dan Disney , single work poetry (p. 144)
Mujeongwiundong Mangwon-dong (North Korean Blanket Remix)i"A stooped walk, long and with day. Heavy seed", Kent MacCarter , single work poetry (p. 145)
Ugg Bootsi"Fine dust falls like first snow So I wear my Uggs bought in Melbourne", Yideum Kim , single work poetry (p. 146)
'Face Made Out of Steel'i"Is love a thief", Yideum Kim , single work poetry (p. 147)
Reflectedi"The dusk is lace and velvet - Insects arise, a netting", Jessica Wilkinson , single work poetry (p. 148-149)
George Jarvis, Black Hindoo Servant, Port Jackson, 1809 (Preparatory Study), Roanna Gonsalves , single work short story (p. 150-154)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Perched on the Edge of the Ocean, Writing Saskia Beudel , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: TEXT : Journal of Writing and Writing Courses , April vol. 22 no. 1 2018;

'Since pre-colonial days in northern Australia, cultural practices, material objects and living things have been exchanged and transformed across the sea. Biologists and archaeologists believe that Australia’s dingo was introduced by Asian seafarers around 4,000 years ago. It adapted and spread across the continent and was incorporated within Aboriginal cosmologies. From at least 1700, Makassar fishermen harvested trepang (or sea-cucumber) on an annual basis in Australia, with China also participating in this trade. Anthropologists in the late nineteenth century and early twentieth, Alfred Cort Haddon and Donald Thomson, noted the interweaving of cultural traditions among Indigenous populations spread across the Arafura Sea.' (Introduction)

Perched on the Edge of the Ocean, Writing Saskia Beudel , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: TEXT : Journal of Writing and Writing Courses , April vol. 22 no. 1 2018;

'Since pre-colonial days in northern Australia, cultural practices, material objects and living things have been exchanged and transformed across the sea. Biologists and archaeologists believe that Australia’s dingo was introduced by Asian seafarers around 4,000 years ago. It adapted and spread across the continent and was incorporated within Aboriginal cosmologies. From at least 1700, Makassar fishermen harvested trepang (or sea-cucumber) on an annual basis in Australia, with China also participating in this trade. Anthropologists in the late nineteenth century and early twentieth, Alfred Cort Haddon and Donald Thomson, noted the interweaving of cultural traditions among Indigenous populations spread across the Arafura Sea.' (Introduction)

Last amended 31 Jan 2018 16:38:37
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