AustLit logo
person or book cover
Courtesy of Allen & Unwin.
y separately published work icon Pink single work   novel   young adult  
Issue Details: First known date: 2009... 2009 Pink
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'The pink jumper was practically glowing in my grey bedroom. It was like a tiny bit of Dorothy's Oz in boring old black-and-white Kansas. Pink was for girls.

'Ava Simpson is trying on a whole new image. Stripping the black dye from her hair, she heads off to the Billy Hughes School for Academic Excellence, leaving her uber-cool girlfriend, Chloe, behind.

'Ava is quickly taken under the wing of perky, popular Alexis who insists that: a) she's a perfect match for handsome Ethan; and b) she absolutely must audition for the school musical.

'But while she's busy trying to fit in - with Chloe, with Alexis and her Pastel friends, even with the misfits in the stage crew - Ava fails to notice that her shiny reinvented life is far more fragile than she imagined.' (From the publisher's website.)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Crows Nest, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Allen and Unwin , 2009 .
      person or book cover
      Courtesy of Allen & Unwin.
      Extent: 288p.
      ISBN: 9781741758344
    • c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      HarperTeen ,
      2011 .
      image of person or book cover 1485682623848749683.png
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 310p.p.
      ISBN: 9780061926532

Works about this Work

Neither Very Bi Nor Particularly Sexual : The Essence of the Bisexual in Young Adult Literature Bonnie Kneen , 2015 single work
— Appears in: Children's Literature in Education , December vol. 46 no. 4 2015; (p. 359-377)
'This article examines four prominent young adult novels about bisexual protagonists: Julie Anne Peters’s It’s Our Prom (So Deal With It) (2012), Brent Hartinger’s Double Feature: Attack of the Soul-Sucking Brain Zombies/Bride of the Soul-Sucking Brain Zombies (2007), Lili Wilkinson’s Pink (2009), and Sara Ryan’s Empress of the World (2001). Defining bisexuality in terms of gender-plural sexual desire, it argues that narratives about bisexuals may impose essentializing identities, which resignify and redefine bisexuality through the use of stereotypes and the evasion of the sexuality and plurality of bisexual desire. By doing this, Peters and Hartinger, who represent the ideological middle ground in such narratives, ironically sustain the invisibility of bisexuality that they ostensibly resist. Of the novels by Wilkinson and Ryan, Wilkinson’s Pink is the most stereotypical and evasive example, while Ryan’s Empress of the World, at the other extreme, manages to avoid essentializing bisexuality, seeing it in terms of plural desires. If narratives of bisexuality are to help bisexual teenagers interpret their plural desires and fill the bisexual spaces or gaps in their worlds, it is argued that this necessitates a shift towards approaches, like Ryan’s, that recognize the variety and individuality of these teenagers.' (Publication abstract)
Belles, Angels and Love Jenny Hale , 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 14 February 2010; (p. 13)

— Review of Pink Lili Wilkinson , 2009 single work novel
Under Age 2010 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 10 January 2010; (p. 17)

— Review of Pink Lili Wilkinson , 2009 single work novel ; Cicada Summer Kate Constable , 2009 single work children's fiction
[Review] Pink Susan La Marca , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Fiction Focus : New Titles for Teenagers , vol. 23 no. 3 2009; (p. 50)

— Review of Pink Lili Wilkinson , 2009 single work novel
Untitled Jane Campbell , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of The Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 53 no. 3 2009; (p. 39)

— Review of Pink Lili Wilkinson , 2009 single work novel
Fiction Cameron Woodhead , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 1 August 2009; (p. 20)

— Review of Pink Lili Wilkinson , 2009 single work novel
Compelling Attractions Despite All the Disturbing Twists Marisa Pintado , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 12 September 2009; (p. 18)

— Review of Stolen : A Letter to My Captor Lucy Christopher , 2009 single work novel ; Pink Lili Wilkinson , 2009 single work novel
Untitled Kate O'Donnell , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Bookseller + Publisher Magazine , July vol. 88 no. 9 2009; (p. 45)

— Review of Pink Lili Wilkinson , 2009 single work novel
[Untitled] Emily Meldrum , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Viewpoint : On Books for Young Adults , Spring vol. 17 no. 3 2009; (p. 48)

— Review of Pink Lili Wilkinson , 2009 single work novel
[Untitled] Anne Briggs , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , July vol. 24 no. 3 2009; (p. 44)

— Review of Pink Lili Wilkinson , 2009 single work novel
Neither Very Bi Nor Particularly Sexual : The Essence of the Bisexual in Young Adult Literature Bonnie Kneen , 2015 single work
— Appears in: Children's Literature in Education , December vol. 46 no. 4 2015; (p. 359-377)
'This article examines four prominent young adult novels about bisexual protagonists: Julie Anne Peters’s It’s Our Prom (So Deal With It) (2012), Brent Hartinger’s Double Feature: Attack of the Soul-Sucking Brain Zombies/Bride of the Soul-Sucking Brain Zombies (2007), Lili Wilkinson’s Pink (2009), and Sara Ryan’s Empress of the World (2001). Defining bisexuality in terms of gender-plural sexual desire, it argues that narratives about bisexuals may impose essentializing identities, which resignify and redefine bisexuality through the use of stereotypes and the evasion of the sexuality and plurality of bisexual desire. By doing this, Peters and Hartinger, who represent the ideological middle ground in such narratives, ironically sustain the invisibility of bisexuality that they ostensibly resist. Of the novels by Wilkinson and Ryan, Wilkinson’s Pink is the most stereotypical and evasive example, while Ryan’s Empress of the World, at the other extreme, manages to avoid essentializing bisexuality, seeing it in terms of plural desires. If narratives of bisexuality are to help bisexual teenagers interpret their plural desires and fill the bisexual spaces or gaps in their worlds, it is argued that this necessitates a shift towards approaches, like Ryan’s, that recognize the variety and individuality of these teenagers.' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 17 Nov 2015 09:55:41
X