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Issue Details: First known date: 2002... 2002 The Black Lords of Summer : The Story of the 1868 Aboriginal Tour of England and Beyond
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

An amazing account of the establishment and reception of the Aboriginal team which represented Australia in the 1868 tour of England. Written and researched by well known cricket author Ashley Mallett.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

[Review Essay] The Black Lords of Summer: The Story of the 1868 Aboriginal Tour of England and Beyond Bernard Whimpress , 2003 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Aboriginal Studies , no. 1 2003; (p. 90-91)

'Ashley Mallett’s newest book, The Black Lords of Summer, his fourth for UQP, purports to be historical and is possibly his most ambitious work. Its subtitle suggests that it might provide a narrative history of the tour and examine its repercussions. It would be nice to say that it succeeds but it doesn’t. It doesn’t ask historical questions and it doesn’t reach historical conclusions. The author (a journalist by training) may feel that words like ‘story’ and ‘beyond’ give him the licence to stray off the track but good journalists, and especially good historians, maintain much better control over their material than is exhibited here.'  (Introduction)

[Review Essay] The Black Lords of Summer: The Story of the 1868 Aboriginal Tour of England and Beyond Bernard Whimpress , 2003 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Aboriginal Studies , no. 1 2003; (p. 90-91)

'Ashley Mallett’s newest book, The Black Lords of Summer, his fourth for UQP, purports to be historical and is possibly his most ambitious work. Its subtitle suggests that it might provide a narrative history of the tour and examine its repercussions. It would be nice to say that it succeeds but it doesn’t. It doesn’t ask historical questions and it doesn’t reach historical conclusions. The author (a journalist by training) may feel that words like ‘story’ and ‘beyond’ give him the licence to stray off the track but good journalists, and especially good historians, maintain much better control over their material than is exhibited here.'  (Introduction)

Last amended 1 Jul 2009 11:01:55
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