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y separately published work icon I, the Aboriginal single work   biography  
Issue Details: First known date: 1962... 1962 I, the Aboriginal
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Notes

  • Written from interviews with the Aboriginal man Waipuldanya or Wadjiri-Wadjiri (Phillip Roberts) who was born in the Roper River region in 1922.

  • Made into a film for TV by Cecil Holmes, and shown on the ABC.
  • Other formats: Also braille, sound.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Adelaide, South Australia,: Rigby , 1962 .
      Extent: 240p.
      Description: illus., map, ports.
      Reprinted: 1971
      ISBN: 0851792219
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Cassell ,
      1963 .
      Extent: 240p.
    • Adelaide, South Australia,: Rigby , 1966 .
      Extent: 1 vol.p.
      Edition info: School edition.
    • Adelaide, South Australia,: Rigby , 1980 .
      Extent: 200p.
      Description: illus. (part col.), maps (on lining papers)
      Note/s:
      • Illustrated by Ainslie Roberts.
      ISBN: 0727013653
    • Adelaide, South Australia,: Rigby , 1984 .
      Extent: 1 vol.p.
      ISBN: 0727020285
    • Belair, Mitcham area, Adelaide - South / South East, Adelaide, South Australia,: Art Australia , 1992 .
      Extent: 240 p., [17] p. of platesp.
      ISBN: 1875168060
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon I, the Aboriginal; Moon and Rainbow Douglas Lockwood , Dick Roughsey , Sydney : Seal Books , 1995 Z1436315 1995 selected work biography autobiography Sydney : Seal Books , 1995
    • Chatswood, Chatswood - Gordon - Castlecrag area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: New Holland , 2018 .
      image of person or book cover 713429554063728725.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 1v.p.
      Note/s:
      • Published May 2018.

      ISBN: 9781742575001
Alternative title: Tabu : ein Tatsachenbericht
Language: German

Works about this Work

Negotiating the “Drunken Aborigine”: Alcohol in Indigenous Autobiography Sam Dalgarno , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , vol. 42 no. 1 2018; (p. 51-64)

'This article approaches the question of how Aboriginal Australians describe their own experiences of drinking alcohol, sometimes to excess, and how they recover, through a reading of seven autobiographies alongside the scholarship on Aboriginal drinking. The evidence contained in these life stories stresses personal factors and adds to the picture we glean from the scholarship, whether academic or governmental, epidemiological, anthropological or historical, which explains Aboriginal drinking habits in more social terms. Thus, the autobiographies themselves make an important intervention into the scholarship on Aboriginal drinking. Beyond this, negotiating with the stereotype of the “drunken Aborigine” is unavoidable for Aboriginal people who write about their drinking and these autobiographies represent a challenge to this popular image. This article examines a previously unexamined discourse on Aboriginal drinking that goes some way towards undermining the public representation of a drunken Aboriginal culture while simultaneously giving individual Aboriginal Australians greater voice in describing their past and current experiences.' (Publication abstract)

Postcolonial 'Testimonio' : Reading Aboriginal Narratives Pramod K. Nayar , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Down Under : Australian Literary Studies Reader 2009; (p. 173-181)
Spitting the Dummy : Collaborative Life Writing and Ventriloquism Michael Jacklin , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: New Literatures Review , April no. 43 2005; (p. 67-81)
This article sets out to 'trace the deployment of the metaphor of ventriloquism in collaborative life writing, highlight the frequency with which it is utilised, and to suggest that its application in critical reading may have outrun its usefulness' (p69). It engages with life writing theorists including G. Thomas Couser and Paul John Eakin, and includes comment on Tim Rowse's reading of the Australian Aboriginal life writing text, I, the Aboriginal.
Spitting the Dummy : Collaborative Life Writing and Ventriloquism Michael Jacklin , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: New Literatures Review , April no. 43 2005; (p. 67-81)
This article sets out to 'trace the deployment of the metaphor of ventriloquism in collaborative life writing, highlight the frequency with which it is utilised, and to suggest that its application in critical reading may have outrun its usefulness' (p69). It engages with life writing theorists including G. Thomas Couser and Paul John Eakin, and includes comment on Tim Rowse's reading of the Australian Aboriginal life writing text, I, the Aboriginal.
Postcolonial 'Testimonio' : Reading Aboriginal Narratives Pramod K. Nayar , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Down Under : Australian Literary Studies Reader 2009; (p. 173-181)
Negotiating the “Drunken Aborigine”: Alcohol in Indigenous Autobiography Sam Dalgarno , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , vol. 42 no. 1 2018; (p. 51-64)

'This article approaches the question of how Aboriginal Australians describe their own experiences of drinking alcohol, sometimes to excess, and how they recover, through a reading of seven autobiographies alongside the scholarship on Aboriginal drinking. The evidence contained in these life stories stresses personal factors and adds to the picture we glean from the scholarship, whether academic or governmental, epidemiological, anthropological or historical, which explains Aboriginal drinking habits in more social terms. Thus, the autobiographies themselves make an important intervention into the scholarship on Aboriginal drinking. Beyond this, negotiating with the stereotype of the “drunken Aborigine” is unavoidable for Aboriginal people who write about their drinking and these autobiographies represent a challenge to this popular image. This article examines a previously unexamined discourse on Aboriginal drinking that goes some way towards undermining the public representation of a drunken Aboriginal culture while simultaneously giving individual Aboriginal Australians greater voice in describing their past and current experiences.' (Publication abstract)

Last amended 28 Sep 2018 00:24:12
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