AustLit logo
person or book cover
Screen cap from opening credits
form y separately published work icon Love My Way series - publisher   film/TV  
Issue Details: First known date: 2004... 2004 Love My Way
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

The first Australian drama series to be made specifically for pay television, Love My Way follows the lives of a group of thirty-somethings who explore issues of friendship, step-parenting, divorce, and relationships. It deals with the randomness of life and the need many of us have to carve out a place in the world.

Central to the series is Frankie Paige, who attempts to negotiate the web of contemporary relationships, juggle the priorities of family obligations, and be both successful at love and fulfilled professionally, while hoping that 'happiness' might occur if all the other things fall into place. She lives with Tom, a once-successful chef who now cooks at the local rehabilitation hospital. Just down the road in a much nicer house lives her ex-husband (and Tom's brother), Charlie. An emotionally stunted architect/surfer now married to Julia, he and Frankie still have a relationship through their daughter, Lou. Throughout the series, these principal characters are pulled and strained by desires and contradictions that appear to be part and parcel of modern life.

Notes

  • Award-winning and individually published episodes in this series are included on AustLit.

  • Further Reference:

    • Love My Way page at tv.com (sighted 27/09/2010)
    • Love My Way at Australian Television Information Archive (sighted 29/10/2010).

Includes

1.9
form y separately published work icon Only Mortal Jacquelin Perske , Australia : Channel W , 2005 Z1367423 2005 single work film/TV

'Frankie and Charlie are deep in their own worlds of pain. She finds solace in dreams while Charlie pushes away those trying to help him and turns to work, drink and nicotine to numb his grief. He won't open up and Julia is left to grieve alone.'

Source: The Australian Television Information Archive (http://www.australiantelevision.net/lovemyway/series1.html). (Sighted: 19/10/2012)

Australia : Channel W , 2005
2.3
form y separately published work icon Cold Blooded Creatures Tony McNamara , 2007 Z1425202 2007 single work film/TV 2007
2.8
form y separately published work icon A Different Planet Louise Fox , Australia : Channel W , 2005 Z1367427 2005 single work film/TV Australia : Channel W , 2005
3.10
form y separately published work icon One Big Happy Tony McNamara , Australia : Showtime , 2006 Z1367421 2006 single work film/TV

'Dylan tries to impress his new friends with haunted house stories but they cross the line with Frankie when they hold a séance. Charlie tries to lift Julia out of her deepening depression. He eventually meets with some success but not before she admits to some dark feelings. Tom begins his three tasks to win back Katie but a misunderstanding causes things to quickly backfire, but Tom is persistent. Di and Clive return from New York. Although his father's condition has worsened, Lewis maintains the distant relationship he's had with Clive all his life, but he does take Dylan to meet his grandfather.'

Source: Australian Television Information Archive (http://www.australiantelevision.net/lovemyway/series2.html). (Sighted: 19/10/2012)

Australia : Showtime , 2006
3.6
form y separately published work icon Car Without Brakes Tony McNamara , Australia : Showtime , 2007 Z1438670 2007 single work film/TV Australia : Showtime , 2007

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First known date: 2004

Works about this Work

Love My Way : Was This the Most Devastating Moment in Australian TV History? Clem Bastow , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: The Guardian Australia , 23 February 2017;
'With its powerhouse cast and generous heart, the series was one of the finest Australia has produced – and there’s one episode that still jolts.'
Full Focus Stephanie Van Schilt , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 4 June 2016;
'Director Emma Freeman's filmography includes some of Australia’s best-loved TV dramas, but her greatest challenge came at a much earlier age.'
Twice as Good Graeme Blundell , 2010 single work biography
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 14-15 August 2010; (p. 5-6)
Biefly discusses Karvan's role in a new film Mei Mei by Pauline Chan .
Southern Stars and Secret Lives : International Exchange in Australian Television Ian Craven , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum : Journal of Media & Cultural Studies , vol. 22 no. 1 2008; (p. 51-67)
'The Secret Life of Us is a 'high end' television drama series, defined by 'adult themes, sexual references and low-level coarse language', first screened in Australia and the United Kingdom in mid-2001, and surviving for four seasons until late 2005. Developed by Southern Star, with the Ten Network, and Optus Television (a US-based pay TV service), it was the first Australian drama series to be commissioned by the United Kingdom's Channel 4. Eighty-six episodes were screened prior to cancellation. At the peak of its popularity, the series had been sold into a dozen or so (mostly European) territories, and against the usual odds, secured airtime in the United States, where it was picked up by Trio, a small west-coast cable network. It gained positive critical recognition, and fared well at television markets worldwide. Back in Australia, commentators linked the show with the return of the Ten Network to 'credible' drama after a hiatus of two decades (Sams 2001, 37), and with the emergence of a 'sophisticated and quirky' youth sub-genre (Idato 2000, 2), before enthusiasm cooled around series two and three, and series four drew the by now largely neglected narrative to its almost unnoticed conclusion. The project offers a suggestive case study of momentary trends in domestic drama production, within material received as confidently articulating Australia's globalizing television culture at the millennium, inviting exploration of what John Hartley (1992, 102) has seen as the fundamental 'impurity' of national television, and the productivity of its identification as a 'fundamental criterion for cultural studies'.' (Author's introduction p. 51)
Lost Their Way Anthony Clarke , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Limelight , February 2006; (p. 46)

— Review of Love My Way Jacquelin Perske , Tony McNamara , Marissa Cooke , Brendan Cowell , Louise Fox , Fiona Seres , Blake Ayshford , Sarah Lambert , 2004 series - publisher film/TV
Lost Their Way Anthony Clarke , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: Limelight , February 2006; (p. 46)

— Review of Love My Way Jacquelin Perske , Tony McNamara , Marissa Cooke , Brendan Cowell , Louise Fox , Fiona Seres , Blake Ayshford , Sarah Lambert , 2004 series - publisher film/TV
The Face : Jacquelin Perske : Screenwriter Sophie Tedmanson , 2006 single work biography
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 28-29 January 2006; (p. 3)
Twice as Good Graeme Blundell , 2010 single work biography
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 14-15 August 2010; (p. 5-6)
Biefly discusses Karvan's role in a new film Mei Mei by Pauline Chan .
Southern Stars and Secret Lives : International Exchange in Australian Television Ian Craven , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum : Journal of Media & Cultural Studies , vol. 22 no. 1 2008; (p. 51-67)
'The Secret Life of Us is a 'high end' television drama series, defined by 'adult themes, sexual references and low-level coarse language', first screened in Australia and the United Kingdom in mid-2001, and surviving for four seasons until late 2005. Developed by Southern Star, with the Ten Network, and Optus Television (a US-based pay TV service), it was the first Australian drama series to be commissioned by the United Kingdom's Channel 4. Eighty-six episodes were screened prior to cancellation. At the peak of its popularity, the series had been sold into a dozen or so (mostly European) territories, and against the usual odds, secured airtime in the United States, where it was picked up by Trio, a small west-coast cable network. It gained positive critical recognition, and fared well at television markets worldwide. Back in Australia, commentators linked the show with the return of the Ten Network to 'credible' drama after a hiatus of two decades (Sams 2001, 37), and with the emergence of a 'sophisticated and quirky' youth sub-genre (Idato 2000, 2), before enthusiasm cooled around series two and three, and series four drew the by now largely neglected narrative to its almost unnoticed conclusion. The project offers a suggestive case study of momentary trends in domestic drama production, within material received as confidently articulating Australia's globalizing television culture at the millennium, inviting exploration of what John Hartley (1992, 102) has seen as the fundamental 'impurity' of national television, and the productivity of its identification as a 'fundamental criterion for cultural studies'.' (Author's introduction p. 51)
Full Focus Stephanie Van Schilt , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 4 June 2016;
'Director Emma Freeman's filmography includes some of Australia’s best-loved TV dramas, but her greatest challenge came at a much earlier age.'
Love My Way : Was This the Most Devastating Moment in Australian TV History? Clem Bastow , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: The Guardian Australia , 23 February 2017;
'With its powerhouse cast and generous heart, the series was one of the finest Australia has produced – and there’s one episode that still jolts.'
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X