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Issue Details: First known date: 2005... 2005 Missed Encounters: Repetition, Rewriting, and Contemporary Returns to Charles Dickens's Great Expectations
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'This article looks at rewritings of a well-made Victorian multiplot novel completed in 1862, Charles Dickens's Great Expectations, to explore the dynamic between precursor and latecomer in terms of narrative operation. I am particularly interested in the remembering and reinterpreation of the literary canon, in acts of generative citation that bring the (Eurocentric) literary past to recurring life. The first section looks briefly at Kathy Acker's and Sue Roe's extrapolations of the classic and at Alfonso Curaron's 1998 film. The second section is a reading of Peter Carey's brilliant Dickensian pastiche Jack Maggs.' (p.109)

Notes

  • Epigraph: I love you, but, because inexplicably I love in you something more than you -- the objet petit a -- I mutilate you. (Jacques Lacan, The Four Fundamental Concepts of Psycho-Analysis)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Dickens Adapted John Glavin (editor), Farnham : Ashgate , 2012 Z1903348 2012 anthology criticism From their first appearance in print, Dickens's fictions immediately migrated into other media, and particularly, in his own time, to the stage. Since then Dickens has continuously, apparently inexhaustibly, functioned as the wellspring for a robust mini-industry, sourcing plays, films, television specials and series, operas, new novels and even miniature and model villages. If in his lifetime he was justly called 'The Inimitable', since his death he has become just the reverse: the Infinitely Imitable. The essays in this volume, all appearing within the past twenty years, cover the full spectrum of genres. Their major shared claim to attention is their break from earlier mimetic criteria - does the film follow the novel? - to take the new works seriously within their own generic and historical contexts. Collectively, they reveal an entirely 'other' Dickensian oeuvre, which ironically has perhaps made Dickens better known to an audience of non-readers than to those who know the books themselves. Farnham : Ashgate , 2012 pg. 461-486
Last amended 27 Nov 2012 14:33:58
108-133 Missed Encounters: Repetition, Rewriting, and Contemporary Returns to Charles Dickens's Great Expectationssmall AustLit logo Contemporary Literature
461-486 Missed Encounters: Repetition, Rewriting, and Contemporary Returns to Charles Dickens's Great Expectationssmall AustLit logo
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