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y separately published work icon Jack Maggs single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1997... 1997 Jack Maggs
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

The year is 1837 and a stranger is prowling London. He is Jack Maggs, an illegal returnee from the prison island of Australia. He has the demeanor of a savage and the skills of a hardened criminal, and he is risking his life on seeking vengeance and reconciliation.
Influenced by Charles Dickens's Great Expectations.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Faber ,
      1997 .
      image of person or book cover 2617901325464973989.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 327p.
      ISBN: 057119088X
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Knopf ,
      1998 .
      image of person or book cover 291598106495331201.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 306p.
      ISBN: 0679440089
    • Toronto, Ontario,
      c
      Canada,
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Vintage Canada ,
      1999 .
      image of person or book cover 7270644309089175312.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 357p.
      ISBN: 0679309799
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Faber ,
      2011 .
      image of person or book cover 414146000079144875.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 327p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 3 February 2011
      ISBN: 9780571270170
    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 2015 .
      image of person or book cover 886235776249768650.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 352p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 22 April 2015
      ISBN: 9780143571278
    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 2020 .
      image of person or book cover 7816699229419765534.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 480p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 3 March 2020
      ISBN: 9781760896447
Language: Dutch

Other Formats

  • Braille
  • Sound recording.
  • Large print.

Works about this Work

“Ripped and Tortured Skin” : Mapping the Body in Peter Carey’s Jack Maggs Brandi Estey-Burtt , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: Ariel , April - July vol. 50 no. 2-3 2019; (p. 191-217)
'This article reads Peter Carey’s novel Jack Maggs (1997) through a focus on mapping and mobility. Following John Thieme’s recent attention to postcolonial literary geographies, the article argues that ideas of mapping in the text move away from fixed notions of place and space in order to disrupt colonial dynamics of control and power. It suggests that Jack Maggs explores the concept of vernacular cartography, in which bodies bear their own maps of trauma and transience. The eponymous Jack Maggs destabilizes the borders of Empire through his mobility, though he in turn faces attempts by other characters to manage and discipline his itinerant body. Similarly, the article considers how Carey’s fictional mobility—his engagement with Charles Dickens’  Great  Expectations  and his representation of Victorian England—challenges the literary maps that had long been used to fix Australian identity. Through its concern with mobile bodies, Jack Maggs performs a postcolonial cartography that blurs notions of maps and how they represent the bodies of people, texts, and nations.' (Publication abstract)
Jack Maggs and Peter Carey's Fiction as a World Keyvan Allahyari , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 31 no. 2 2017; (p. 326-341)

'[...]Peter Widdowson argues that Jack Maggs, along with a number of other counterdiscursive novels, are books that "almost invariably have a clear cultural-political thrust": " That is why the majority of them align themselves with feminist and/or postcolonialist criticism in demanding that past texts' complicity in oppression . . . be revised and re-visioned as part of the process of restoring a voice, a history and an identity to those hitherto re-visionary fiction exploited, marginalized and silenced by dominant interests and ideologies" (505-6). Because of the novel's overt generic subversiveness and its direct engagement with Victorian literature, it is not a surprise that Jack Maggs has been viewed as a predictable category through this kind of reductive and self-affirming lens more than most of Carey's other novels have. Savery was married in England and had a son named Henry, who, like his namesake Maggs's adopted son, would have been twenty-one years old in 1837. [...]of the only three copies left of the original manuscripts of Saver y's Quintos Servinton, one is held in the Mitchell Library in Sydney, where Maggs's fictional letters are preserved. [...]it is that language and literature jointly provide political foundations for a nation" (World 34). Schmidt-Haberkamp comments on the usage of the phrase "such is life" by Great Expectations' working-class Joe and Maggs and the way that it reverberates with the nationalist spirit of Joseph Furphy's classic Australian novel Such Is Life: "Containing the fictional diaries of Tom Collins, a former bullocky, the novel in 1897 was offered to The Bulletin for serial publication by its author with the description: 'Temper democratic; bias, offensively Australian'" (258). [...]Jack Maggs is as much a text about Carey as it is about Dickens, Maggs, and Oates and the literary cultures that all of these "authors" dwell in and represent, divided around two literary poles of England and Australia.' (Publication abstract)

The Narrow Road to the Deep North and the De-Sacralisation of the Nation Lars Jensen , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Le Simplegadi , no. 16 2016; (p. 74-85)

Richard Flanagan’s novel The Narrow Road to the Deep North represents yet another addition to the catalogue of Australian war experience literature. The awards and accompanying praise the novel has earned since its release in 2013 reflects a widespread appreciation of its ability to reimagine Australia in a saturated terrain. Flanagan’s novel can be read as a critique of the rise of militant nationalism emerging in the wake of Australia’s backing of Bush’s ‘war on terror’ and the idea that the arrival of boat refugees requires a military and militant response. This article discusses how the novel’s shift from battle heroics to the ordeal of POWs in the Thai jungle represents a reimagining – away from the preoccupation with epic battles – but not necessarily a challenge to the overriding emphasis on baptism of fire narratives as the only truly national narratives.

Full Text PDF

Peter Carey's Jack Maggs : Re-Doing Dickens's Re-Doings of Dickens C. Kenneth Pellow , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers on Language and Literature : A Journal for Scholars and Critics of Language and Literature , Winter vol. 49 no. 1 2013; (p. 86-108)
Emotion, Motive, Narrative : Finding Heartland in Kim Scott’s Benang and Peter Carey’s Jack Maggs Victoria Genevieve Reeve , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 3 2012;
'In this essay, I want to explore the possibility that the success of narrative in stimulating empathy comes from the relation that narrative bears to emotion—where emotion is a kind of proto-narrative that possibly accounts for the structure and range of narratives themselves —and that our familiarity with emotions as micro-narratives results in the motivation of narrative. That is, the resolution of events occurs in terms of feeling rather than other forms of closure, since other forms of closure represent literal endings as, quite simply, the cessation of events whereas emotion achieves its end by being felt or translated in empathetic terms and in ways that endure beyond the formality of the fictive event that ends the narrative. I will be using Kim Scott's Benang: From the Heart (1999) and Peter Carey's Jack Maggs (1997) to discuss narrative and emotions, or the role of emotion in motivating narrative events and the role of narrative in conveying and stirring emotion in the reader.' (Author's abstract)
[Review] Jack Maggs Melissa Bellanta , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: JAS Review of Books , April no. 14 2003;

— Review of Jack Maggs Peter Carey , 1997 single work novel ; The Unusual Life of Tristan Smith Peter Carey , 1994 single work novel ; Oscar and Lucinda Peter Carey , 1988 single work novel ; Illywhacker Peter Carey , 1985 single work novel ; The Tax Inspector Peter Carey , 1991 single work novel ; Collected Stories Peter Carey , 1994 selected work short story
Second Look Peter Craven , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 5 September 2004; (p. 23)

— Review of Jack Maggs Peter Carey , 1997 single work novel
[Review] Jack Maggs Bharat Tandon , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die 2006; (p. 860)

— Review of Jack Maggs Peter Carey , 1997 single work novel
Carey Lives Up to Great Expectations Lucy Frost , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 10 August 1997; (p. 7)

— Review of Jack Maggs Peter Carey , 1997 single work novel
Comeuppance from Down Under in Dickens of a Book Erica Wagner , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: The Times , 18 September 1997; (p. 43)

— Review of Jack Maggs Peter Carey , 1997 single work novel
Peter Carey's Jack Maggs and the Trauma of Convictisn Elizabeth Francesca Ho , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 17 no. 2 2003; (p. 124-132)
Writing Nineteenth-Century Fiction in the Twentieth Century Robert Sirabian , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Publications of the Mississippi Philological Association 2002; (p. 53-60)
Rewriting the Empire of the Imagination: The Post-Imperial Gothic K. J. Renk , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Journal of Commonwealth Literature , vol. 39 no. 2 2004; (p. 61-71)
Renk's thesis is that Carey and Byatt 'parody the style and conventions of Victorian literature, as they also critique and satirize the Imperial Gothic novel.' She argues that 'while the Imperial Gothic novel reveals the anxieties of ebbing Empire, the Post-Imperial Gothic novel [of Carey and Byatt] exposes how Victorian writers plundered the minds of the marinalized to create art p.62).
Concealed Meaning in Peter Carey's Jack Maggs Trevor Byrne , 1995 single work criticism
— Appears in: The CRNLE Reviews Journal , no. 1-2 1995; (p. 106-115)
Byrne discusses Carey's novel as being essentially an exploration of the process of fictional writing, inviting the reader to think about what underlies the process of selectivity involved in creating stories.
A Ghost Story in Two Parts : Charles Dickens, Peter Carey, and Avenging Phantoms Alice Brittan , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 21 no. 4 2004; (p. 40-55)

Awards

1998 winner Miles Franklin Literary Award
1998 winner International Awards Commonwealth Writers Prize South-East Asia and South Pacific Region Best Book from the Region Award
1998 winner International Awards Commonwealth Writers Prize Overall Best Book Award
1997 winner The Age Book of the Year Award Fiction Prize
Last amended 31 Jan 2020 09:15:55
Settings:
  • c
    England,
    c
    c
    United Kingdom (UK),
    c
    Western Europe, Europe,
  • c
    Australia,
    c
  • 1800-1899
Influenced by:
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