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y separately published work icon Shifting Scenes in Theatrical Life single work   autobiography  
Issue Details: First known date: 1859... 1859 Shifting Scenes in Theatrical Life
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Eliza Winstanley, Colonial Stage Star and Our First Female Richard III Jane Woollard , 2019 single work biography
— Appears in: The Conversation , 2 May 2019;

'In December 1882, Eliza O’Flaherty died of “diabetes and exhaustion” at her lodgings in Sydney. Aged 64, Eliza lived in a brick cottage behind a dyeworks, where she had been employed as manager for two years. Her demise might seem unremarkable: a widowed, childless woman of the 19th century who had been worn out by work. But O'Flaherty was actually Eliza Winstanley, the first woman to play Richard III in an Australian theatre, and an early star of the colonial stage.' (Introduction)

'The Elasticity of Her Spirits' : Actresses and Resilience on the Nineteenth-Century Colonial Stage Jane Woollard , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Drama Studies , April no. 70 2017; (p. 7-34)

'Eliza Winstanley (1818 - 82) and Maria Taylor (1805? - 41) were English-born actors who were among the early leading performers in Barnett Levey's acting company at his Theatre Royal in George Street, Sydney. Taylor's parents were 'singing actors' who, in the first years of the nineteenth century, performed at London's Haymarket and Covent Garden theatres, and were regularly engaged for the summer seasons in provincial theatres. Winstanley also came from a theatrical family - her father was a scenic painter and her younger sister Ann was a performer. This article describes how Maria Taylor and Eliza Winstanley brought their theatrical skills and resilience to the task of building a theatrical culture in Australia. Both women faced many challenges in their personal and professional lives but both possessed the capacity to bounce back, continuing to practise and refine their craft in difficult circumstances.' (Publication abstract)

y separately published work icon Eliza! Eliza! : The Biography of Eliza Winstanley, 1818-1882 Nance Irvine , Canberra : Mulini Press , 1997 Z148308 1997 single work biography
y separately published work icon Eliza! Eliza! : The Biography of Eliza Winstanley, 1818-1882 Nance Irvine , Canberra : Mulini Press , 1997 Z148308 1997 single work biography
'The Elasticity of Her Spirits' : Actresses and Resilience on the Nineteenth-Century Colonial Stage Jane Woollard , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Drama Studies , April no. 70 2017; (p. 7-34)

'Eliza Winstanley (1818 - 82) and Maria Taylor (1805? - 41) were English-born actors who were among the early leading performers in Barnett Levey's acting company at his Theatre Royal in George Street, Sydney. Taylor's parents were 'singing actors' who, in the first years of the nineteenth century, performed at London's Haymarket and Covent Garden theatres, and were regularly engaged for the summer seasons in provincial theatres. Winstanley also came from a theatrical family - her father was a scenic painter and her younger sister Ann was a performer. This article describes how Maria Taylor and Eliza Winstanley brought their theatrical skills and resilience to the task of building a theatrical culture in Australia. Both women faced many challenges in their personal and professional lives but both possessed the capacity to bounce back, continuing to practise and refine their craft in difficult circumstances.' (Publication abstract)

Eliza Winstanley, Colonial Stage Star and Our First Female Richard III Jane Woollard , 2019 single work biography
— Appears in: The Conversation , 2 May 2019;

'In December 1882, Eliza O’Flaherty died of “diabetes and exhaustion” at her lodgings in Sydney. Aged 64, Eliza lived in a brick cottage behind a dyeworks, where she had been employed as manager for two years. Her demise might seem unremarkable: a widowed, childless woman of the 19th century who had been worn out by work. But O'Flaherty was actually Eliza Winstanley, the first woman to play Richard III in an Australian theatre, and an early star of the colonial stage.' (Introduction)

Last amended 12 Jun 2017 13:17:37
Subjects:
  • London,
    c
    England,
    c
    c
    United Kingdom (UK),
    c
    Western Europe, Europe,
  • 1850s
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