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y separately published work icon Tomorrow and Tomorrow single work   novel   science fiction  
Issue Details: First known date: 1947... 1947 Tomorrow and Tomorrow
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Tomorrow is a novel within a novel. Knarf (read it backwards and remember Dalby Davison) is a 24-century novelist who has written an historical novel about a group of Sydney people in the 20th century.

'His story begins in the 20s, runs through the Depression, faithfully describes the course of WWII until the time when the date catches up with the story, and Marjorie had to begin to prophesy'. Source: review 'The Censorship of Yesterday Hid a Great Tomorrow'.

Exhibitions

Notes

  • Also published in sound recording format.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Notes:
This first edition of the novel was censored before publication by the Australian Government, leading to changes being made by the publisher to the title and the text. It was republished in its original form, with its original title, in 1983.
Alternative title: Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow
Notes:
Introduced by Anne Chisholm. Uncensored edition.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Virago ,
      1983 .
      image of person or book cover 3297318691363509693.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Series: y separately published work icon Virago Modern Classics Virago (publisher), 1978- Z1498171 1978 series - publisher
    • Garden City, New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Dial Press ,
      1984 .
    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Untapped , 2021 .
      image of person or book cover 5178895598415432177.png
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 1v.p.
      ISBN: 9781922749512

Works about this Work

'Dystopia' : A History of the Genre in (and) Australia Amy Schoonens , 2020 single work criticism
— Appears in: Beyond the Dark : Dystopian Texts in the Secondary English Classroom 2020; (p. 8-34)
Foreword Philip Mead , 2020 single work criticism
— Appears in: Beyond the Dark : Dystopian Texts in the Secondary English Classroom 2020; (p. viii-x)
y separately published work icon Reflectant Tides : The Aqueous Poetics of Sydney in Women's Fiction, 1934-1947 Meg Brayshaw , Penrith : 2018 18029044 2018 single work thesis

'In Sydney, the period between the two world wars was a time of rapid change, when ‘modern’ was considered a goal to which the city and its people should strive. The 1930s were bookended by the opening of the Harbour Bridge in 1932 and the 1938 Sesquicentenary of the First Fleet’s landing, two events that figured Sydney as the triumphant end point of a narrative of national, white Australian progress. This period also saw the publication of a number of novels by Australian women writers that took the contemporary city as their setting and scrutinised urban modernity as a state of being and an ideological position. This thesis takes as its focus five novels that depict and debate the multiple and often combative discourses of modernity that flowed through Australia’s first and most populous urban centre in the interwar period: Seven Poor Men of Sydney (1934) by Christina Stead, Jungfrau (1936) by Dymphna Cusack, Waterway (1938) by Eleanor Dark, Foveaux (1939) by Kylie Tennant, and Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow (1947; 1983) by M. Barnard Eldershaw. Through close reading within and across the novels, I argue that this generation of women writers pioneered a distinctly Australian, modern urban poetics that is best described as aqueous. Responding to Sydney as a dynamic estuarine environment, each writer mobilises water as location and literary device, infusing the modern city’s spaces and processes with productively aqueous qualities of changeability and circulation, unsettlement and motility. Making heuristic use of a Benjaminian framework for dialectical urban thinking, I read this aqueous poetics of Sydney against the narrative of progress epitomised by the Bridge and Sesquicentenary, arguing that in contradistinction to this narrative, the novels present an Australian urban modernity of material emplacement in an unpredictably watery sphere, where history settles and sediments, multiple ideological schemas flow into one another, and relations between bodies, space and power generate constant contestation.'

Source: Abstract.

The Case of the Trashy, Tripey Novel with a Marxist Slant : M Barnard Eldershaw and Science Fiction Gillian Polack , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Aurealis , no. 102 2017;
Apocalyse Vs Utopia : A Writers Guide Lucy Sussex , 2014 single work essay
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 74 no. 1 2014; (p. 90-102)
Tomorrow and Tomorrow (and also Tomorrow) Graham Stone , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: Notes on Australian Science Fiction 2001; (p. 35-37)

— Review of Tomorrow and Tomorrow M. Barnard Eldershaw , 1947 single work novel
Comparing the Critics : 'Two of a Trade Can Ne'er Agree' 1950 single work review
— Appears in: The Austrovert , December no. 1 1950; (p. 7)

— Review of Tomorrow and Tomorrow M. Barnard Eldershaw , 1947 single work novel ; Dusty : The Story of a Sheep Dog Frank Dalby Davison , 1946 single work children's fiction ; Dust or Polish? Norman Lindsay , 1950 single work novel
Classical View of Wartime Yvonne Rousseau , 1983 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 27 August 1983; (p. 10)

— Review of Tomorrow and Tomorrow M. Barnard Eldershaw , 1947 single work novel
The Censorship of Yesterday Hid a Great Tomorrow Barbara Jefferis , 1983 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian Magazine , 10-11 September 1983; (p. 14)

— Review of Tomorrow and Tomorrow M. Barnard Eldershaw , 1947 single work novel ; The Roaring Nineties : A Story of the Goldfields in Western Australia Katharine Susannah Prichard , 1946 single work novel
Prophetic Classic Restored Colin Steele , 1983 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 22 October 1983; (p. 16)

— Review of Tomorrow and Tomorrow M. Barnard Eldershaw , 1947 single work novel
The Golden Age of Australian Science Fiction Sean McMullen , 1995 single work column
— Appears in: Science Fiction : A Review of Speculative Literature , vol. 12 no. 3 (Issue 36) 1995; (p. 3-28)
Memory, Community, and Writing in Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow Ian Saunders , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 64 no. 1 2004; (p. 101-114)
Explores the themes of memory, forms of community, and the writing process itself in the work Tomorrow and Tomorrow.
The Bonds of Friendship : The Demise of 'M. Barnard Eldershaw' Maryanne Dever , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Hecate , vol. 30 no. 2 2004; (p. 129-147)
The article examines the development leading to the end of the collaboration between Barnard and Eldershaw and explores elements of tension within the collaboration in an attempt to find out why Barnard in her later comments consistently tried to diminish Eldershaw's contribution to the latter stages of their partnership. From letters examined and comments in Nettie Palmer's diary, Dever concludes that Barnard's relationship with Frank Dalby Davison, and the role he played in the group of friends, had a considerable impact on the partnership and on the way Barnard presented the collaboration after Eldershaw's death.
Writing the 'Fatal Moment' : Crisis, Community and the Literary Imagination in M. Barnard Eldershaw's Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow Julieanne Lamond , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 4 no. 2005; (p. 121-132)
Proposes a fresh reading of the novel as being essentially 'about writers and writing, and how they fit into the world around them' (p.121).
Around the World 1947 single work column
— Appears in: The Australasian Book News and Literary Journal , November vol. 2 no. 5 1947; (p. 280)
Last amended 6 Dec 2021 16:28:56
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