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y separately published work icon A is for Aunty single work   picture book   children's  
Issue Details: First known date: 2000... 2000 A is for Aunty
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Memories of growing up on an Aboriginal mission are brought to life in this alphabet picture book with a difference. It features accounts of possums as pets and Aunty Goldie who used zinc ointment for just about every ailment.' (Publication summary)

Notes

  • Alphabet book with stories based on the author's childhood growing up on the mission at Murrin Bridge, NSW.
  • Included in the 2002 White Ravens Catalogue compiled by the International Youth Library in Munich, Germany. Special mention.
  • This is affiliated with Dr Laurel Cohn's Picture Book Diet because it contains representations of food and/or food practices.

    Food depiction
    • Incidental
    Food types
    • Everyday foods
    • Everyday drinks
    • Bushtucker
    Food practices
    • Food production
    • Food preparation
    Gender
    • Food production - female
    • Food preparation - female [outdoor fire]
    Signage n/a
    Positive/negative value n/a
    Food as sense of place
    • Domestic
    • Rural
    Setting
    • Rural landscape
    Food as social cohesion
    • Rituals
    Food as cultural identity
    • Indigenous Australian characters
    Food as character identity n/a
    Food as language n/a

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Sydney, New South Wales,: ABC Books , 2000 .
      image of person or book cover 4503722268047123413.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 36p.
      Description: col. illus.
      ISBN: 978 0 7333 08727, 0733307299

Other Formats

Works about this Work

What Are We Feeding Our Children When We Read Them a Book? Depictions of Mothers and Food in Contemporary Australian Picture Books Laurel Cohn , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mothers and Food : Negotiating Foodways from Maternal Perspectives 2016; (p. 232-244)

'This chapter explores how Australian writers and illustrators in the twenty-first century depict the act of mothering in picture books for young children in relation to cooking and serving food. It draws on the idea that children’s texts can be understood as sites of cultural production and reproduction, with social conventions and ideologies embedded in their narrative representations. The analysis is based on a survey of 124 books that were shortlisted for, or won, Children’s Book Council of Australia awards between 2001 and 2013. Of the eighty-seven titles that contain food and have human or anthropomorphised characters, twenty-six (30 percent) contain textual or illustrative references to maternal figures involved in food preparation or provision. Examination of this data set reveals that there is a strong correlation between non-Anglo-Australian maternal figures and home-cooked meals, and a clear link between Anglo-Australian mothers and sugar-rich snacks. The relative paucity of depictions of ethnically unmarked mothers offering more nutritious foods is notable given the cultural expectations of mothers as caretakers of their children’s well-being. At the same time, the linking of non-Anglo-Australian mothers with home-cooked meals can be seen as a means of signifying a cultural authenticity, a closeness to the earth that is differentiated from the normalised Australian culture represented in picture books. This suggests an unintended alignment of mothers preparing and serving meals with “otherness,” which creates a distancing effect between meals that may generally be considered nutritious and the normalised self. I contend there are unexamined, and perhaps unexpected, cultural assumptions about ethnicity, motherhood, and food embedded in contemporary Australian picture books. These have the potential to inscribe a system of beliefs about gender, cultural identity, and food that contributes to readers’ understanding of the world and themselves.'

Source: Abstract.

Paranoid Prizing : Mapping Australia’s Eve Pownall Award for Information Books, 2001–2010 Erica Hateley , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Bookbird , January vol. 51 no. 1 2013; (p. 41-50)
'Each year, the Children's Book Council of Australia (CBCA) administers a number of Book of the Year Awards, including the Eve Pownall Award for Information Books. The books chosen by the CBCA constitute a contemporary canon of Australian children's literature, and serve to both shape and reflect current educational policies and practices as well as young Australians' sense of themselves and their nation. This paper reads a selection of award-winning Australian non-fiction children's literature in the context of colonialism, curriculum, military myths, and Aboriginal perspectives on national history and identity.'
Spreading the Seeds : Australian Indigenous Publishing for Young People Robyn Sheahan-Bright , 2009 single work essay
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , May vol. 24 no. 2 2009; (p. 8-12)

Sheahan-Bright explores '...the growth in publishing by Indigenous writers and publishers, and of writing on Indigenous cultural themes, and some of the issues which confront publishers when dealing with Indigenous writers and illustrators' (8). The article begins with some background, and points out that despite a cultural and artistic heritage that dates back thousands of years, Indigenous writing and publishing has not been widely recognised in mainstream Australian until most recently and Sheahan-Bright says "This is despite their having been engaged in colonial conflict and later subject to the...assimilation policies which discouraged involvement with European notions of literacy" (8). She discusses the origins of the Indigenous publishing houses Aboriginal Studies Press (ASP), Institute of Aboriginal Development (IAD Press), Magabala Books, Keeaira Press, Black Ink Press, Indij Readers and briefly refers to the above mentioned texts in the section entitled 'what's being published'. This leads into a summary of the five main issues in relation to Indigenous publishing and the 'need for authenticity in writing about Indigenous peoples and culture' (11). Sheahan-Bright lists these issues as 'respect for country and Indigenous control of material', relevance of copyright issues, lack of understanding from non-Indigenous Australians, the need to consider 'protocol, specific authority, appropriation' and finally, to develop an awareness of the social factors that contribute to the socially and economically disadvantaged position of the majority of Indigenous Australians. She argues that 'knowledge of Indigenous culture is a genuine part of Australian culture ...and the publishing output should reflect that' (12). However, she concludes that while 'there has been growth in publishing Indigenous voices in English', in general, 'there are many miles still to be travelled and many seeds still to be sown' (12)

Situating Childhood: A Reading of Spatiality in Aboriginal Picture Books Trish Lunt , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , May vol. 15 no. 1 2005; (p. 59-67)
In this essay, Lunt's objective is to read spatiality in Aboriginal picture books through the representations of inhabitation and spatial phenomena. The analysis focuses on Bob Randall and Kunyi June-Anne McInerney's Tracker Tjugingji (2003) which Lunt argues, invites readers to share a journey in and through cultural constructions of spatiality. Elaine Russell's A is for Aunty (2000) creates a montage of performative spatiality that links space and time while in Russell's most recent picture book, The Shack That Dad Built (2004), representations of spatiality are personified by embodiment. All three texts offer new ways of understanding spatiality and says Lunt, invite further explorations of 'the spatialisation of Australian childhood' (67).
The Children's Book Council of Australia Annual Awards 2001 2001 single work column
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 45 no. 3 2001; (p. 2-12)
Untitled Elspeth Cameron , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 44 no. 3 2000; (p. 38-39)

— Review of A is for Aunty Elaine Russell , 2000 single work picture book
Top Reads for Kids Cindy Lord , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 11 August 2001; (p. 6)

— Review of The Singing Hat Tohby Riddle , 2000 single work picture book ; A is for Aunty Elaine Russell , 2000 single work picture book ; Fox Margaret Wild , 2000 single work picture book ; Faust's Party Matt Ottley , 2000 single work picture book ; Rain Dance Cathy Applegate , 2000 single work picture book ; The Lost Thing Shaun Tan , 2000 single work picture book
Eve Pownall Award for Information Books Eleanor Stodart , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 18 August 2001; (p. 18)

— Review of Building the Sydney Harbour Bridge John Nicholson , 2000 single work non-fiction ; A is for Aunty Elaine Russell , 2000 single work picture book
Bonding Margaret Dunkle , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , July no. 222 2000; (p. 59-60)

— Review of Baby Tania Cox , 2000 single work picture book ; Anna the Goanna and Other Poems Jill McDougall , 2000 selected work poetry ; A is for Aunty Elaine Russell , 2000 single work picture book ; The Cassowary's Quiz Carmel Bird , 2000 single work picture book ; Facing the Tiger Kerri Pitts , Larry Pitts , 2000 single work picture book
The Children's Book Council of Australia Annual Awards 2001 2001 single work column
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 45 no. 3 2001; (p. 2-12)
Situating Childhood: A Reading of Spatiality in Aboriginal Picture Books Trish Lunt , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , May vol. 15 no. 1 2005; (p. 59-67)
In this essay, Lunt's objective is to read spatiality in Aboriginal picture books through the representations of inhabitation and spatial phenomena. The analysis focuses on Bob Randall and Kunyi June-Anne McInerney's Tracker Tjugingji (2003) which Lunt argues, invites readers to share a journey in and through cultural constructions of spatiality. Elaine Russell's A is for Aunty (2000) creates a montage of performative spatiality that links space and time while in Russell's most recent picture book, The Shack That Dad Built (2004), representations of spatiality are personified by embodiment. All three texts offer new ways of understanding spatiality and says Lunt, invite further explorations of 'the spatialisation of Australian childhood' (67).
Spreading the Seeds : Australian Indigenous Publishing for Young People Robyn Sheahan-Bright , 2009 single work essay
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , May vol. 24 no. 2 2009; (p. 8-12)

Sheahan-Bright explores '...the growth in publishing by Indigenous writers and publishers, and of writing on Indigenous cultural themes, and some of the issues which confront publishers when dealing with Indigenous writers and illustrators' (8). The article begins with some background, and points out that despite a cultural and artistic heritage that dates back thousands of years, Indigenous writing and publishing has not been widely recognised in mainstream Australian until most recently and Sheahan-Bright says "This is despite their having been engaged in colonial conflict and later subject to the...assimilation policies which discouraged involvement with European notions of literacy" (8). She discusses the origins of the Indigenous publishing houses Aboriginal Studies Press (ASP), Institute of Aboriginal Development (IAD Press), Magabala Books, Keeaira Press, Black Ink Press, Indij Readers and briefly refers to the above mentioned texts in the section entitled 'what's being published'. This leads into a summary of the five main issues in relation to Indigenous publishing and the 'need for authenticity in writing about Indigenous peoples and culture' (11). Sheahan-Bright lists these issues as 'respect for country and Indigenous control of material', relevance of copyright issues, lack of understanding from non-Indigenous Australians, the need to consider 'protocol, specific authority, appropriation' and finally, to develop an awareness of the social factors that contribute to the socially and economically disadvantaged position of the majority of Indigenous Australians. She argues that 'knowledge of Indigenous culture is a genuine part of Australian culture ...and the publishing output should reflect that' (12). However, she concludes that while 'there has been growth in publishing Indigenous voices in English', in general, 'there are many miles still to be travelled and many seeds still to be sown' (12)

Paranoid Prizing : Mapping Australia’s Eve Pownall Award for Information Books, 2001–2010 Erica Hateley , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Bookbird , January vol. 51 no. 1 2013; (p. 41-50)
'Each year, the Children's Book Council of Australia (CBCA) administers a number of Book of the Year Awards, including the Eve Pownall Award for Information Books. The books chosen by the CBCA constitute a contemporary canon of Australian children's literature, and serve to both shape and reflect current educational policies and practices as well as young Australians' sense of themselves and their nation. This paper reads a selection of award-winning Australian non-fiction children's literature in the context of colonialism, curriculum, military myths, and Aboriginal perspectives on national history and identity.'
What Are We Feeding Our Children When We Read Them a Book? Depictions of Mothers and Food in Contemporary Australian Picture Books Laurel Cohn , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mothers and Food : Negotiating Foodways from Maternal Perspectives 2016; (p. 232-244)

'This chapter explores how Australian writers and illustrators in the twenty-first century depict the act of mothering in picture books for young children in relation to cooking and serving food. It draws on the idea that children’s texts can be understood as sites of cultural production and reproduction, with social conventions and ideologies embedded in their narrative representations. The analysis is based on a survey of 124 books that were shortlisted for, or won, Children’s Book Council of Australia awards between 2001 and 2013. Of the eighty-seven titles that contain food and have human or anthropomorphised characters, twenty-six (30 percent) contain textual or illustrative references to maternal figures involved in food preparation or provision. Examination of this data set reveals that there is a strong correlation between non-Anglo-Australian maternal figures and home-cooked meals, and a clear link between Anglo-Australian mothers and sugar-rich snacks. The relative paucity of depictions of ethnically unmarked mothers offering more nutritious foods is notable given the cultural expectations of mothers as caretakers of their children’s well-being. At the same time, the linking of non-Anglo-Australian mothers with home-cooked meals can be seen as a means of signifying a cultural authenticity, a closeness to the earth that is differentiated from the normalised Australian culture represented in picture books. This suggests an unintended alignment of mothers preparing and serving meals with “otherness,” which creates a distancing effect between meals that may generally be considered nutritious and the normalised self. I contend there are unexamined, and perhaps unexpected, cultural assumptions about ethnicity, motherhood, and food embedded in contemporary Australian picture books. These have the potential to inscribe a system of beliefs about gender, cultural identity, and food that contributes to readers’ understanding of the world and themselves.'

Source: Abstract.

Last amended 20 Nov 2018 10:23:51
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