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y separately published work icon The Cockatoos : Shorter Novels and Stories selected work   short story  
Issue Details: First known date: 1974... 1974 The Cockatoos : Shorter Novels and Stories
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Notes

  • Dedication: To Ronald Waters for having survived forty-eight years of friendship.

Contents

* Contents derived from the London,
c
England,
c
c
United Kingdom (UK),
c
Western Europe, Europe,
:
Jonathan Cape , 1974 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
A Woman's Hand, Patrick White , single work short story (p. 9-94)
The Full Belly, Patrick White , single work short story (p. 95-119)
The Night the Prowler, Patrick White , single work short story (p. 120-168)
Five-Twenty, Patrick White , single work short story (p. 169-196)
Sicilian Vespers, Patrick White , single work short story (p. 197-258)
The Cockatoos, Patrick White , single work short story (p. 259-307)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Viking ,
      1975 .
      image of person or book cover 5595710166937492214.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Alternative title: The Cockatoos : Stories
      Extent: 307p.
      ISBN: 0670226483
    • Harmondsworth, Middlesex,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Ringwood, Ringwood - Croydon - Kilsyth area, Melbourne - East, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin ,
      1978 .
      image of person or book cover 8108425870174598890.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 284p.
      Note/s:
      • Reprinted six times by 1993.
      ISBN: 0140044639
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Collected Short Stories: The Burnt Ones, The Cockatoos, Three Uneasy Pieces Patrick White , London : Vintage , 2004 Z1431431 2004 collected work short story London : Vintage , 2004
    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Text Publishing , 2019 .
      image of person or book cover 2732762221808839903.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 308p.p.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Gail Jones.

      • Published 4 June 2019.

      ISBN: 9781925773606
      Series: y separately published work icon Text Classics Text Publishing (publisher), Melbourne : Text Publishing , 2012- Z1851461 2012 series - publisher novel 'Great books by great Australian storytellers.' (Text website.)
Alternative title: Las cacatuas
Language: Spanish
    • Barcelona,
      c
      Spain,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Plaza & Janés ,
      1976 .
      image of person or book cover 81408602707404573.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 360p.
      Reprinted: 1979
      ISBN: 8401301750

Other Formats

  • Also sound recording.

Works about this Work

Beautiful and Clumsy Gail Jones , 2019 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 8 June 2019; (p. 16)
The Decorative Voice of Hidden, Secret Flesh: Corporeal Dynamics in Patrick White’s Fiction Bridget Grogan , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Literary Studies , vol. 30 no. 2 2014; (p. 1-19)
'With reference to Roland Barthes’s and Julia Kristeva’s observations on the bodily origins of language, this article argues that physicality is an important aspect, both thematically and stylistically, of the fiction of Australian Nobel prizewinner, Patrick White. Kristeva’s theory of the “symbolic” and “semiotic” aspects of signification, developed in her book Revolution in Poetic Language (1984), informs the argument that White’s writing emphasises a dualism of rationality and physicality at work within language and literature. Taking Kristeva’s observation that the “semiotic” or bodily aspect of language – evident in asymbolic poetic effects such as rhythm and rhyme – is comparable to music, the article explores White’s interest in music as expressed within his fiction. It argues, accordingly, that White’s frequent descriptions of music function as metatextual elements within his writing that draw attention to the materiality of language, the poetic dimension of his prose, and his association of representation with corporeality. Finally, in a reading of the short story “Five-Twenty”, from the collection The Cockatoos ([1974]1979), White’s interest in corporeal markings – which emphasise signification as bodily and corporeality as a language – is explored.' (Publication summary)
Incorporating the Physical Corporeality, Abjection and the Role of Laura Trevelyan in Voss Bridget Grogan , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Patrick White Centenary : The Legacy of a Prodigal Son 2014; (p. 63-81)
‘This essay argues that corporeality forms the focus of a close narrative attention and is ultimately granted a redemptive significance in Patrick White's fiction. The argument therefore opposes the opinions of critics who, at the height of critical interest in White's writing during the 1970s and 1980s, identified White's attention to the body as a sign of radical disgust and thus of a defining dualism that posits the 'purity' of the disembodied spirit in relation to the 'pollution' of the material world. Brian Kiernan, for example, read White's writing as presenting "the soul imprisoned in the corrupting flesh." (1976, 462) For Ron Shepherd, White's novels suggested that the "physical world and bodily existence" is a "facade which must be pierced by the deeper mind in order to arrive at a better understanding." (1978, 29) A.P. Riemer claimed that White's writing is "dedicated to the notion that the body, the flesh and the senses are utterly worthless." (1980, 26) ’ (Introduction)
The Wide Brown Land : Literary Readings of Space and the Australian Continent Anthony J. Hassall , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 45-53)
'In his 1987 poem "Louvres" Les Murray speaks of journeys to 'the three quarters of our continent/set aside for mystic poetry" (2002, 239), a very different reading of Australia's inner space to A.D. Hope's 1939 vision of it as '[t]he Arabian desert of the human mind" (1966, 13) In this paper I review the opposed, contradictory ways in which the inner space of Australia has been perceived by Australian writers, and note changes in those literary perceptions, especially in the last fifty years. In that time what was routinely categerised, by Patrick White among others, as the "Dead heart" (1974, 94) - the disappointing desert encountered by nineteenth=century European explorers looking for another America -has been re-mythologised as the "Red Centre," the symbolic, living heart of the continent. What Barcroft Boake's 1897 poem hauntingly portrayed as out where the dead men lie" (140,-2) is now more commonly imagined as a site of spiritual exploration and psychic renewal, a place where Aboriginal identification with the land is respected and even shared. This change was powerfully symbolised in 1985 by the return to the traditional Anangu owners of the title deeds to the renamed Uluru, the great stone sited at the centre of the continent; but while this re-mythologising has been increasingly influential in literary readings, older, more negative constructions of that space as hostile and sterile have persisted, so that contradictory attitudes towards the inner space of Australia continue to be expressed. In reviewing a selection of those readings, I am conscious that they both distort and influence broader cultural perceptions. I am also aware that literary reconstructions of the past reflect both the attitudes of the time depicted and the current attitudes of the writer, and that separating the two is seldom simple. Finally, I am conscious of the connections between literary readings and those in art and film of the kind documented by Roslynn Hanes in her 1998 study Seeking the Centre: the Australian Desert in Literature, Art and Film, and those in television and advertising. I have however, with the exception of the Postscript, limited my paper to literary readings, with an emphasis on works published since Haynes's study.' (Author's abstract p. 45)
y separately published work icon Stories That Keep on Rising to the Surface : i racconti di Patrick White Annalisa Pes , Verona : Universita di Verona. Dipartimento di Anglistica , 2003 Z1130147 2003 single work criticism
The Cockatoos: Patrick White's Short Stories Set Society Against the Silent, Natural Man John Docker , 1974 single work review
— Appears in: The National Times , 4-9 November 1974; (p. 22)

— Review of The Cockatoos : Shorter Novels and Stories Patrick White , 1974 selected work short story
[Review] The Cockatoos 1974 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 28 June 1974; (p. 687)

— Review of The Cockatoos : Shorter Novels and Stories Patrick White , 1974 selected work short story
[Review] The Cockatoos G. Fawcett , 1974 single work review
— Appears in: Books and Bookmen , vol. 21 no. 3 1974; (p. 58-9)

— Review of The Cockatoos : Shorter Novels and Stories Patrick White , 1974 selected work short story
[Review] The Cockatoos Carl Harrison-Ford , 1974 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian , 22 June 1974; (p. 6)

— Review of The Cockatoos : Shorter Novels and Stories Patrick White , 1974 selected work short story
[Review] The Cockatoos Leonie Kramer , 1974 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 22 June 1974; (p. 13)

— Review of The Cockatoos : Shorter Novels and Stories Patrick White , 1974 selected work short story
Epiphanies in Tables and Goats: The Burnt Ones and The Cockatoos John Weigel , 1990 extract (Epiphanies in Tables and Goats: The Burnt Ones, The Cockatoos, and Four Plays)
— Appears in: Critical Essays on Patrick White 1990; (p. 189-198)
y separately published work icon Stories That Keep on Rising to the Surface : i racconti di Patrick White Annalisa Pes , Verona : Universita di Verona. Dipartimento di Anglistica , 2003 Z1130147 2003 single work criticism
The Wide Brown Land : Literary Readings of Space and the Australian Continent Anthony J. Hassall , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 45-53)
'In his 1987 poem "Louvres" Les Murray speaks of journeys to 'the three quarters of our continent/set aside for mystic poetry" (2002, 239), a very different reading of Australia's inner space to A.D. Hope's 1939 vision of it as '[t]he Arabian desert of the human mind" (1966, 13) In this paper I review the opposed, contradictory ways in which the inner space of Australia has been perceived by Australian writers, and note changes in those literary perceptions, especially in the last fifty years. In that time what was routinely categerised, by Patrick White among others, as the "Dead heart" (1974, 94) - the disappointing desert encountered by nineteenth=century European explorers looking for another America -has been re-mythologised as the "Red Centre," the symbolic, living heart of the continent. What Barcroft Boake's 1897 poem hauntingly portrayed as out where the dead men lie" (140,-2) is now more commonly imagined as a site of spiritual exploration and psychic renewal, a place where Aboriginal identification with the land is respected and even shared. This change was powerfully symbolised in 1985 by the return to the traditional Anangu owners of the title deeds to the renamed Uluru, the great stone sited at the centre of the continent; but while this re-mythologising has been increasingly influential in literary readings, older, more negative constructions of that space as hostile and sterile have persisted, so that contradictory attitudes towards the inner space of Australia continue to be expressed. In reviewing a selection of those readings, I am conscious that they both distort and influence broader cultural perceptions. I am also aware that literary reconstructions of the past reflect both the attitudes of the time depicted and the current attitudes of the writer, and that separating the two is seldom simple. Finally, I am conscious of the connections between literary readings and those in art and film of the kind documented by Roslynn Hanes in her 1998 study Seeking the Centre: the Australian Desert in Literature, Art and Film, and those in television and advertising. I have however, with the exception of the Postscript, limited my paper to literary readings, with an emphasis on works published since Haynes's study.' (Author's abstract p. 45)
Epiphanies in Tables and Goats: The Burnt Ones, The Cockatoos, and Four Plays John Weigel , 1983 single work criticism
— Appears in: Patrick White 1983; (p. 87-103)
Austerities and Epiphanies: A Note on Fantasy and Repression in Patrick White's "Five-Twenty" Lee Spinks , 1995 single work criticism
— Appears in: Westerly , Autumn vol. 40 no. 1 1995; (p. 39-44)
Last amended 30 Oct 2019 13:24:57
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