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y separately published work icon Myself When Young single work   autobiography  
Issue Details: First known date: 1948... 1948 Myself When Young
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'The writer whom many of the critics call one of the greatest of novelists has here told the story of her own childhood and youth. When Henry (Ethel F. Lindesay Robertson) died she left all but completed a volume of autobiography concerned with her youth in Australia, her subsequent stay in Leipzig and the first years of her intensely happy marriage. Final details were available from the notes and diary of her husband, and these together with an essay on her work are added to complete the book.' (Publication summary)

Contents

* Contents derived from the New York (City), New York (State),
c
United States of America (USA),
c
Americas,
:
W. W. Norton , 1948 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
The Art of Henry Handel Richardson : An Essay in Appreciative Criticism [1928-1929], John George Robertson , single work criticism biography
J. G. Robertson, HHR's husband, wrote this essay in1928-1929. He discusses the European influences on HHR's writing and calls Maurice Guest the greatest English naturalistic novel.
(p. 153-210)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Heinemann , 1948 .
      Extent: 214p.
      Reprinted: 1964
      Note/s:
      • Together with an essay 'The art of Henry Handel Richardson' by her husband, J.G. Robertson (q.v.), and a bibliography.

        Published posthumously. The story from 1895 to 1903 was written by Olga M. Roncoroni.

      • Foreword by Edna Purdie
    • Port Melbourne, South Melbourne - Port Melbourne area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Minerva , 1992 .
      image of person or book cover 2449811524430058782.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 163p.
      ISBN: 1863302247 (pbk.)
    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Text Publishing , 2019 .
      image of person or book cover 5540509741219438606.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 192p.p.
      Note/s:
      • Published August 2019.
      • Introduction by Brenda Niall.
      ISBN: 9781925773958 (pbk), 9781925774719 (ebk)
      Series: y separately published work icon Text Classics Text Publishing (publisher), Melbourne : Text Publishing , 2012- Z1851461 2012 series - publisher novel 'Great books by great Australian storytellers.' (Text website.)

Works about this Work

Behaving Badly : The Coming-of-Age of a National Cinema Alice Healy-Ingram , 2013 single work column
— Appears in: Telling Stories : Australian Life and Literature 1935–2012 2013; (p. 350-356)
The Silver Age of Fiction Peter Pierce , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , Summer vol. 70 no. 4 2011; (p. 110-115)

‘In human reckoning, Golden Ages are always already in the past. The Greek poet Hesiod, in Works and Days, posited Five Ages of Mankind: Golden, Silver, Bronze, Heroic and Iron (Ovid made do with four). Writing in the Romantic period, Thomas Love Peacock (author of such now almost forgotten novels as Nightmare Abbey, 1818) defined The Four Ages of Poetry (1820) in which their order was Iron, Gold, Silver and Bronze. To the Golden Age, in their archaic greatness, belonged Homer and Aeschylus. The Silver Age, following it, was less original, but nevertheless 'the age of civilised life'. The main issue of Peacock's thesis was the famous response that he elicited from his friend Shelley - Defence of Poetry (1821).’ (Publication abstract)

Overflow Rosemary Sorensen , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 23-24 October 2010; (p. 23)
What's in a Name? : Authorship, Autobiography, and Henry Handel Richardson's Myself When Young Dunya Lindsey , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 24 no. 1 2010; (p. 49-54)
'Composing the Self' : Metaphors of Creativity in Henry Handel Richardson's Myself When Young Dunya Lindsey , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 22 no. 2 2005; (p. 205-216)
'This essay interrogates Richardson's representation of her choice of a literary over a musical career, arguing that this choice was a matter not only of ability and opportunity, but signals a shift from public and social performance to private literary production' (p. 205).
Paperbacks Philippa Hawker , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 9 January 1993; (p. 5)

— Review of Maurice Guest Henry Handel Richardson , 1908 single work novel ; Myself When Young Henry Handel Richardson , 1948 single work autobiography
Enigma of Australian Letters L. V. Kepert , 1948 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 28 August 1948; (p. 6)

— Review of Myself When Young Henry Handel Richardson , 1948 single work autobiography
[Review] Myself When Young S.E. , 1948 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Observer , 10 July 1948; (p. 96)

— Review of Myself When Young Henry Handel Richardson , 1948 single work autobiography
[Review] Myself When Young L. A. Triebel , 1948 single work review
— Appears in: Meanjin , Spring vol. 7 no. 3 1948; (p. 195-196)

— Review of The Art of Henry Handel Richardson : An Essay in Appreciative Criticism [1928-1929] John George Robertson , 1928 single work criticism biography ; Myself When Young Henry Handel Richardson , 1948 single work autobiography
Epitaph of a Novelist Uther Barker , 1949 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 10 no. 2 1949; (p. 89-92)

— Review of Myself When Young Henry Handel Richardson , 1948 single work autobiography
'Wishing Papa Was Dead?' : Henry Handel Richardson's Recasting of Her Troubled Childhood in 'Myself When Young' Michael Ackland , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Westerly , November vol. 48 no. 2003; (p. 102-116)
'Composing the Self' : Metaphors of Creativity in Henry Handel Richardson's Myself When Young Dunya Lindsey , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 22 no. 2 2005; (p. 205-216)
'This essay interrogates Richardson's representation of her choice of a literary over a musical career, arguing that this choice was a matter not only of ability and opportunity, but signals a shift from public and social performance to private literary production' (p. 205).
What's in a Name? : Authorship, Autobiography, and Henry Handel Richardson's Myself When Young Dunya Lindsey , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 24 no. 1 2010; (p. 49-54)
Overflow Rosemary Sorensen , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 23-24 October 2010; (p. 23)
The Silver Age of Fiction Peter Pierce , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , Summer vol. 70 no. 4 2011; (p. 110-115)

‘In human reckoning, Golden Ages are always already in the past. The Greek poet Hesiod, in Works and Days, posited Five Ages of Mankind: Golden, Silver, Bronze, Heroic and Iron (Ovid made do with four). Writing in the Romantic period, Thomas Love Peacock (author of such now almost forgotten novels as Nightmare Abbey, 1818) defined The Four Ages of Poetry (1820) in which their order was Iron, Gold, Silver and Bronze. To the Golden Age, in their archaic greatness, belonged Homer and Aeschylus. The Silver Age, following it, was less original, but nevertheless 'the age of civilised life'. The main issue of Peacock's thesis was the famous response that he elicited from his friend Shelley - Defence of Poetry (1821).’ (Publication abstract)

Last amended 6 Aug 2019 11:53:59
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