Issue Details: First known date: 1915... 1915 Lady Bridget in the Never-Never Land : A Story of Australian Life
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Notes

  • Other formats: Also e-book.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Hutchinson ,
      1915 .
      Extent: 336p.
      Reprinted: 1916
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Brentano's ,
      1915 .
      Extent: 336p.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Sydney,: Pandora ,
      1987 .
      Extent: xiii, 293pp.p.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Pam Gilbert.

Works about this Work

Imperial Affairs : The British Empire and the Romantic Novel, 1890–1939 Hsu-Ming Teo , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: New Directions in Popular Fiction : Genre, Distribution, Reproduction 2016; (p. 87-110)

The British romantic novel became a distinct and bestselling genre during the mid-nineteenth century, when Charlotte M. Yonge’s The Heir of Redclyffe (1853) inspired other authors to write thrilling love stories published in triple-decker volumes that were sold at W.H. Smith railway bookstalls or circulated through 'Charles Mudie’s Select Library (Anderson 1974, p. 25). Women writers during this time, such as Yonge, Rhoda Broughton and Mary Elizabeth Braddon, popularised stories that featured the trials and tribulations of British heroes and heroines who fall in love, overcome various obstacles to their relationship, marry or are tragically parted by death (Anderson 1974). Most of their novels are set in Britain or, for more exotic fare, the Continent. However, from the 1890s onwards, they were joined by women writers from Britain’s colonies and dominions. This period was the zenith of British imperial power and, unsurprisingly, women writers used the colonies as exotic backdrops for their love stories. Romantic novels from the 1890s to the Second World War spread imperial fantasies of women who travelled to the colonies, hunted, worked as governesses, nurses and secretaries, managed households, ran viable plantations, fended off attacks by ‘the natives’, fell in love, married and made a place for themselves in the empire. Dreams of love and empire building bloomed in what I am calling women’s imperial romantic novels: love stories set in India, the white settler colonies and dominions, and Saharan and sub-Saharan Africa in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.' (Publication summary)

Britishness and Australian Popular Fiction : From the Mid-Nineteenth to the Mid-Twentieth Centuries Hsu-Ming Teo , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 46-66)
'The analysis offered here is [...], a panoptic perspective of the tangled skeins of literary imagination and imitation, gender and genre requirements, editorial control, market considerations and the sheer economics of the international book trade that knotted Australian popular literature into the cultural and economic fabric of the British empire.' (47)
'The Restless Energies of Freedom' : Revisiting the Celebration of Queensland History Kay Saunders , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Queensland History Journal , November vol. 21 no. 7 2011; (p. 447-455)
Professor Kay Saunders pursues 'an analysis of those Queensland individuals who helped shape our collective consciousness...Analyzing those whose careers are long finished, or indeed those who reside in the grave or the urn, allow for a more skeptical and balanced approach.' (p. 448)
From Ireland to Australia : Gendered Illustrations of the Nation in Maria Edgeworth's Ennui and Rosa Praed's Lady Bridget in the Never-Never Land De Irlanda a Australia : as ilustracions de xenero da nacion en Ennui de Maria Edgeworth e Lady Bridget in the Never-Never Land de Rosa Praed Carmen Maria Fernandez Rodriguez , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia and Galicia : Defeating the Tyranny of Distance 2008; (p. 309-319)
'Altogether Better-Bred Looking' : Race and Romance in the Australian Novels of Rosa Praed Len Platt , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , no. 8 2008; (p. 31-44)
'This essay connects Praed's writing with late nineteenth and early twentieth century history with particular reference to the race issue. It explores races discourses -- Anglo-Saxonism, Celticism and Social Darwininism -- as thse appear in range of Praed's work and shows how scientific racism shaped Praed's reaction to Black Australia.'
Australian Women Writers : The Literary Heritage Michelle Slung , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: Belles-Lettres (US) , Spring vol. 4 no. 3 1989; (p. 7)

— Review of Outlaw and Lawmaker Rosa Praed 1893 single work novel ; An Australian Girl Mrs. Alick Macleod 1890 single work novel ; Lady Bridget in the Never-Never Land : A Story of Australian Life Rosa Praed 1915 single work novel ; The Bond of Wedlock : A Tale of London Life Rosa Praed 1887 single work novel ; A Black Sheep Ada Cambridge 1888-1889 single work novel
Fine Series of Second-Time-Around Fiction Peter Pierce , 1987 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 5 September 1987; (p. 13)

— Review of The Incredible Journey Catherine Martin 1923 single work novel ; Lady Bridget in the Never-Never Land : A Story of Australian Life Rosa Praed 1915 single work novel ; The Bond of Wedlock : A Tale of London Life Rosa Praed 1887 single work novel
Untitled Judith MacBean , 1987 single work review
— Appears in: Antithesis , vol. 1 no. 2 1987; (p. 115-117)

— Review of The Bond of Wedlock : A Tale of London Life Rosa Praed 1887 single work novel ; Lady Bridget in the Never-Never Land : A Story of Australian Life Rosa Praed 1915 single work novel
Recent Fiction 1915 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Town and Country Journal , 15 December vol. 89 no. 2393 1915; (p. 44)

— Review of Lady Bridget in the Never-Never Land : A Story of Australian Life Rosa Praed 1915 single work novel
Finding Lost Fictions : And the Rehabilation of Romance Helen Thomson , 1987 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , June no. 91 1987; (p. 6-7)

— Review of Lady Bridget in the Never-Never Land : A Story of Australian Life Rosa Praed 1915 single work novel
Literary Imaginings of the Bunya Belinda McKay , Patrick Buckridge , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Queensland Review , November vol. 9 no. 2 2002; (p. 65-79)
Writing from the Contact Zone : Fiction by Early Queensland Women Belinda McKay , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Hecate , vol. 30 no. 2 2004; (p. 53-70) Hibiscus and Ti-Tree : Women in Queensland 2009; (p. 30-45)
This paper examines 'some of the ways in which white women novelists also contributed powerfully to shaping the literary imaginative landscape through which Australian readers came to "know" Indigenous people, and the nature of inter-racial contact, in the period before the publication of writing by Indigenous women began to disrupt the textual terrain' (54). The focus is on the writing of women who grew up in rural Queensland and/or used Queensland as settings. The paper concludes that women writers, though presenting themselves as sympathetic and knowledgeable observers and spokespersons for Indigenous people, were 'active participants in the ongoing colonial projects of subjugating Indigenous people and managing perceptions of that process' (68).
'Altogether Better-Bred Looking' : Race and Romance in the Australian Novels of Rosa Praed Len Platt , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , no. 8 2008; (p. 31-44)
'This essay connects Praed's writing with late nineteenth and early twentieth century history with particular reference to the race issue. It explores races discourses -- Anglo-Saxonism, Celticism and Social Darwininism -- as thse appear in range of Praed's work and shows how scientific racism shaped Praed's reaction to Black Australia.'
From Ireland to Australia : Gendered Illustrations of the Nation in Maria Edgeworth's Ennui and Rosa Praed's Lady Bridget in the Never-Never Land De Irlanda a Australia : as ilustracions de xenero da nacion en Ennui de Maria Edgeworth e Lady Bridget in the Never-Never Land de Rosa Praed Carmen Maria Fernandez Rodriguez , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia and Galicia : Defeating the Tyranny of Distance 2008; (p. 309-319)
'The Restless Energies of Freedom' : Revisiting the Celebration of Queensland History Kay Saunders , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Queensland History Journal , November vol. 21 no. 7 2011; (p. 447-455)
Professor Kay Saunders pursues 'an analysis of those Queensland individuals who helped shape our collective consciousness...Analyzing those whose careers are long finished, or indeed those who reside in the grave or the urn, allow for a more skeptical and balanced approach.' (p. 448)
Last amended 24 May 2007 15:20:09
Subjects:
  • Bush,
  • London,
    c
    England,
    c
    c
    United Kingdom (UK),
    c
    Western Europe, Europe,
  • Queensland,
  • Australian Outback, Central Australia,
  • Country towns,
  • Bush,
Settings:
  • 1900s
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