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y separately published work icon Homework single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1999... 1999 Homework
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Homework tells the story of Mina Pereira, born with antennae on top of her head which reflect all she feels, standing straight up with excitement, or drooping with humiliation. With a touch of magical realism, the author paints a lush portrait of Mina's childhood. Mina Pereira longs for a conventional childhood, but it's no wonder-- with the barometric protrusions wired to her brain--she feels a bit like the outsider. What's worse is her overwhelmingly precocious sister, Deepa (she's read all of Dostoevsky by the time she is eight years old), and her younger sister, Shanti, normal beyond reproach. Mina's mother, whose recent illness leaves her barren and literally roosting in trees, doesn't help matters. Mina worries for her mom's well being and while she seeks ways to give her solace, only ends up disappointing her. Mina's father, a revolutionary at heart, manages to pass along heroic advice, even if it does preclude Mina from joining the club of girl scouts. Still, he and Mina share a special bond, although as his wife becomes less and less sane, he retreats from the family, spending more and more of his time in the basement, tinkering. As madness takes hold of Mina's family, the house they live in falls further and further into disrepair until Dad tinkers one time too many with disastrous results. Through all of Mina's experiences, she comes to an understanding about love and family-with not a little heartache, but with maturity and clarity and ultimately, a deep humanity.' Source: http://catdir.loc.gov/catdir/description/hol052/2001277802.html (Sighted 01/04/2008).

Notes

  • Dedication: For my father, with love.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Bloomsbury ,
      1999 .
      image of person or book cover 7710377219488138107.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 259p.
      ISBN: 0747547289 (pbk.), 0747546509
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Bloomsbury ,
      1999 .
      image of person or book cover 1594112298248280026.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 259p.
      Edition info: 1st U.S. ed.
      Note/s:
      • Distributed to the trade by St. Martin's Press.
      ISBN: 1582340609
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Bloomsbury ,
      2001 .
      image of person or book cover 457615898007265538.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 272p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 7 March 2001
      ISBN: 9781582341064
Alternative title: Safran Und Salz
Language: German

Works about this Work

Serving in the Indian Diaspora : The Transnational Domestic Servant in Contemporary Women’s Fiction Maryann Mirza , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Postcolonial Writing , vol. 55 no. 1 2019; (p. 108-120)

'While substantial attention has been paid to the depiction of racial and cultural othering experienced by middle-class female Indian immigrants in the Global North, this article grapples with a rare figure in the fiction of the Indian diaspora: a female immigrant employed as a live-in domestic worker. By focusing on the novel Jasmine (1989) by Bharati Mukherjee and two short stories, “A Pocket Full of Stories” (2009) by Sujatha Fernandes and “Almost Valentine’s Day” (2014) by Mridula Koshy, the article examines how these divergent representations of domestic servitude complicate prevailing interpretations of the Indian diasporic experience, particularly by requiring an engagement with the complex intersection of class, race and gendered identities. Moreover, as this article demonstrates, with their contrasting ideological underpinnings, the three works compel readers to revisit the myth and reality of upward social mobility, and to reconceptualize the meaning of integration and exclusion in a transnational context.' (Publication abstract)

From Cosmopolitanism to Planetary Conviviality : Suneeta Peres da Costa and Michelle de Kretser Alejandra Moreno Álvarez , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 22 2017; (p. 84-94)

'Veronica Brady, vigorous supporter of Aboriginal causes and deeply concerned with social-injustice issues, underlined that Anglo-Australians were to be excommunicated from the land until they would come to terms with it and its first peoples (in Jones 1997). Nearly twenty years after this statement was postulated, it is my purpose in this paper to look at the land from an Anglo-Australian and non-Indigenous Australian perspective in order to assess if Australian contemporary society has moved beyond what Brady considered a “super ego status” and reconciled to the presence not only of its Indigenous, but also its non-Indigenous others. To do so I will exemplify novels which are part of and influenced by the matrix of relations and social forces in which non-indigenous Australian writers are situated on, including Suneeta Peres da Costa’s Homework (1999) and Michelle de Kretser’s Questions of Travel (2013).'

Source: Abstract.

Diaspora, Displacement and Assimilation : Suneeta Peres Da Costa and Bem Le Hunte's Indo-Australian Fiction Vikram K. Koshal , Rabinder Powar , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Narratives of Estrangement and Belonging : Indo-Australian Perspectives 2016; (p. 277-284)

'Today, the ethnic minority and integration discourse of the 1980s and earlier, has been replaced by the diaspora dialogue. This has led to a significant paradigm shift in all facets of studies connected with communities who have left their native countries ans settled in new ones. Australia, with its multiethnic population has its own share of narratives of estrangement and belonging.' (277)

There Goes the Neighbourhood! : The Indian-Subcontinental in the Asian / Australian Literary Precinct Mridula Nath Chakraborty , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 2 2012;
This paper intervenes in the ongoing debate about the nature of Asian Australian Writing, a debate that started sometime circa 2000s and seems to have gathered some force with the putative rise of global Asia. In its early stages, the referent for this academic debate was Asian-American Studies and whether or not it made sense for such a trans-Atlantic term to be applied to the Antipodean region. In the last decade, Australia’s position within the Asian geo-political region has been increasingly articulated with respect to bilateral exchange with its immediate neighbours, mainly in the arena of trade and security. Writing this essay in 2012, it seems that the two strands, the academic and the geographical, have strategically merged to define the parametres of Asian Australian Writing. [First paragraph of the article]
Locating Indo-Australian Fiction in Multicultural Australia Sissy Helff , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Made : A Multicultural Reader 2010; (p. 137-157)
Forecasts: Homework Sybil Steinberg , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Publishers Weekly , 12 July vol. 246 no. 28 1999; (p. 74-75)

— Review of Homework Suneeta Peres da Costa , 1999 single work novel
Untitled Brenda Dowling , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Booklist , 15 September vol. 96 no. 2 1999; (p. 234)

— Review of Homework Suneeta Peres da Costa , 1999 single work novel
Unravelling Families to Make Stories Ian McFarlane , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 2 October 1999; (p. 22)

— Review of Firehead Venero Armanno , 1999 single work novel ; Homework Suneeta Peres da Costa , 1999 single work novel
A Palpable Hit Ivor Indyk , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , August no. 213 1999; (p. 28-29)

— Review of Homework Suneeta Peres da Costa , 1999 single work novel
Putting Out Feelers Liam Davison , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 21-22 August 1999; (p. 14)

— Review of Homework Suneeta Peres da Costa , 1999 single work novel
Re-Thinking Marginality : Class, Identity and Desire in Contemporary Australian Writing Antonio Jose Simoes Da Silva , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Life Writing , vol. 1 no. 1 2004; (p. 45-68)
Disrupting the Past: Magical Realism and Historical Revision in Australian Fiction Kate Hall , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sharing Spaces : Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Responses to Story, Country and Rights 2006; (p. 69-85)
Some Reflections on Selected Writings by Indian Writers in Australia R. K. Dhawan , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Diaspora : The Australasian Experience 2005; (p. 169-176)
This short article provides a comparative analysis of the works listed. Dhawan concludes that the differences depicted in the literary works examined (which he reads as largely autobiographical) override any superficial similarities, regardless of the fact that each of the Australian-born writers has their 'original base-inheritance' in India.
Launching a List John F. Baker , 1999 single work column
— Appears in: Publishers Weekly , 8 March vol. 246 no. 10 1999; (p. 16)
In this brief column, Baker comments on the books 'signed' by Karen Rinaldi, the then new editorial director at Bloomsbury, USA. These include Homework, which appears, in this column, under the working title: 'Song from the Brink of Solitude'.
Re-Writing Suburbia Emily Bullock , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: M/C Journal , May vol. 5 no. 2 2002;
'In Re-writing Suburbia, Emily Bullock brings that often rejected space to bear on considerations of the urban. Tying the suburban to dreams of home ownership and to dreams of nationness, Bullock finds in Suneeta Peres da Costa's recent novel Homework a textual space that subverts the suburban Australian dream without re-invigorating the urban-suburban binary.' [From 'Editorial: The Issue of the Urban,' by Laurie Johnson and Shelley Kulperger, which opens this issue of M/C Journal]
Last amended 13 Jan 2020 08:50:53
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