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y separately published work icon Australian Poetry : Romanticism and Negativity multi chapter work   criticism  
Issue Details: First known date: 1996... 1996 Australian Poetry : Romanticism and Negativity
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

In his first two chapters Kane examines and defines the exact nature of romanticism in Australian poetry, exploring theories of De Man, Bloom and Hartmann, and the philosophical history of "negativity", comparing the theories of Hegel and Freud. Against this unifying theoretical background, he sets individual studies of the work of eight major Australian poets and the literary phenomenon Ern Malley.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Press Syndicate of the University of Cambridge , 1996 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Framing the Question : "What is Australian Poetry?", Paul Kane , single work criticism (p. 1-5, notes 209-210)
The Absence of Romanticism, Paul Kane , single work criticism (p. 8-23, notes 210-215)
Poetic Origins and Negativity, Paul Kane , single work criticism (p. 24-46, notes 215-219)
Charles Harpur and the Myth of Origins, Paul Kane , single work criticism (p. 48-64, notes 220-222)
Henry Kendall's Negations, Paul Kane , single work criticism (p. 65-77, notes 222-224)
Brennan and Poetic Power, Paul Kane , single work criticism (p. 78-94, notes 224-226)
Nihilism in Kenneth Slessor, Paul Kane , single work criticism (p. 96-118, notes 226-229)
A. D. Hope and Romantic Displacement, Paul Kane , single work criticism (p. 119-140, notes 229-231)
"Ern Malley" : The Mystic and the Demystified, Paul Kane , single work criticism (p. 141-153, notes 231-233)
Judith Wright and Silence, Paul Kane , single work criticism (p. 156-169, notes 233-235)
Gwen Harwood and Capable Negativity, Paul Kane , single work criticism (p. 170-184, notes 235-237)
Les Murray and Poetry's Otherworld, Paul Kane , single work criticism (p. 185-202, notes 237-239)
The Negative Strain in Australian Romanticism, Paul Kane , single work criticism (p. 203-208, notes 239-240)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Another Dimension : Sweeney Reed's Visual Poetics Brian Reed , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , vol. 32 no. 1/2 2018; (p. 195-208)

'The Heide Museum's 2011 exhibition Born to Concrete offered a rare opportunity to survey the history of visual poetry—a "hybrid genre … in which linguistic structures support pictorial structures and vice versa"—in Australia from the late 1960s onward (Bohn 100). It included a range of mixed and multimedia pieces, including typewritten texts, collages, prints, sculptures, and found objects, and it featured such figures as Ruth Cowen, Aleks Danko, Jas H. Duke, Peter Murphy, ΠO, Alan Riddell, Alex Selenitsch, and Richard Tipping.' (Introduction)

‘Deep Hanging Out’ : Native Species Images and Affective Labour 2017 single work
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 17 no. 1 2017;

'This paper investigates the affective labour done by, specifically, native species images in Australian poetry, using Judith Wright's bird poems, and various poems about kangaroos as example. It uses the anthropological term, "deep hanging out", borrowed from an article about fashion models, to extend the idea of affective labour, and to measure poems' attentions to birds and animals, and their relation to iconising as the work of nationalism. It is concerned with cultural capital, and Canberra, and the human empire.'  (Publication abstract)

Eliza Hamilton Dunlop's 'The Aboriginal Mother' : Romanticism, Anti Slavery and Imperial Feminism in the Nineteenth Century Katrina Hansord , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-12)
'This paper positions the work of colonial poet Eliza Hamilton Dunlop amongst international Romantic poetry of the period, and argues that Dunlop's poetry reflects a transposition of Romantic women's poetry to Australia. Dunlop's poetry, such as 'The Aboriginal Mother', demonstrates the relationship of Romantic women's poetry to early feminism and Social Reform. As with the work of Felicia Hemans, Dunlop was interested in the role of women, and the 'domestic' as they related to broader national and political concerns. Dunlop seems to have been consciously applying the tropes, such as that of the mother, of anti slavery poetry found within American, British, and international poetic traditions to the Australian aboriginal context. Themes of indigenous motherhood, and also of Sati or widow burning in India, and human rights had been favored by early women's rights campaigners in Britain from the 1820s, focusing on abolition of slavery through the identification of white women with the Negro mother. Dunlop's comparative sympathy for the situation of aboriginals in Australia has been given critical attention as the aspect which makes her work valuable. However, in this essay I hope to outline how Dunlop's poetry fits in to the international context of the engagement of Romantic women poets with Western Imperialist models and colonial Others.' (Author's abstract)
The Immortal Malley and the End of Modernity 'Elizabeth Gralton' , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , December vol. 34 no. 2010;
'An antipodean manifestation of the anti-modern tradition “Remember, this is the country of the duck-billed platypus. When you are cut off from the world, things are bound to develop in interesting ways.” With these words Peter Carey’s character in My Life as a Fake identifies the fundamental factor behind the bizarre aftermath of a literary hoax, namely: particularity of setting. Just as Bob McCorkle, fraudulent creation of Christopher Chubb, comes to life in Carey’s novel to wreak havoc and anguish upon his creator, so too did Ern Malley step out of the imagination of James McAuley and Harold Stewart into Australia of the 1940s, to forge his own place as an almost-person in the history of Australian literature.'
Postcolonial Ecocriticism and the Limits of Green Romanticism Graham Huggan , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Postcolonial Writing , March vol. 45 no. 1 2009; (p. 3-14)
This essay assesses the emerging alliance between postcolonial criticism and ecocriticism in the light of continuing debates on 'Green Romanticism'. It considers what is at stake in contending positions within this debate, what contributions postcolonial writers and thinkers have made to it, and what some of the implications might be of bringing postcolonial criticism and ecocriticism together, both for the reassessment of Romantic ecological legacies and for the 'greening' of postcolonial thought. -- Author's abstract
Addressing Absence Thomas Shapcott , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: The CRNLE Reviews Journal , no. 1-2 1995; (p. 133-137)

— Review of Australian Poetry : Romanticism and Negativity Paul Kane , 1996 multi chapter work criticism
[Review] Australian Poetry : Romanticism and Negativity Martin Duwell , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 18 no. 1 1997; (p. 107-110)

— Review of Bridgings : Readings in Australian Women's Poetry 1996 anthology poetry criticism extract ; Australian Poetry : Romanticism and Negativity Paul Kane , 1996 multi chapter work criticism
Why Read Australian Poetry? Michael Ackland , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , Autumn vol. 57 no. 1 1997; (p. 179-190)

— Review of The Totem Ship Alan Gould , 1996 selected work autobiography criticism biography review prose ; Australian Poetry : Romanticism and Negativity Paul Kane , 1996 multi chapter work criticism ; The Angry Penguin : Selected Poems of Max Harris Max Harris , 1996 selected work poetry
Paul Kane on Australian Poetry Dennis Nicholson , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , February-March no. 178 1996; (p. 33-34)

— Review of Australian Poetry : Romanticism and Negativity Paul Kane , 1996 multi chapter work criticism
Poetry Down Under Peter Steele , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 29 June 1996; (p. 9)

— Review of Australian Poetry : Romanticism and Negativity Paul Kane , 1996 multi chapter work criticism
Postcolonial Ecocriticism and the Limits of Green Romanticism Graham Huggan , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Postcolonial Writing , March vol. 45 no. 1 2009; (p. 3-14)
This essay assesses the emerging alliance between postcolonial criticism and ecocriticism in the light of continuing debates on 'Green Romanticism'. It considers what is at stake in contending positions within this debate, what contributions postcolonial writers and thinkers have made to it, and what some of the implications might be of bringing postcolonial criticism and ecocriticism together, both for the reassessment of Romantic ecological legacies and for the 'greening' of postcolonial thought. -- Author's abstract
The Immortal Malley and the End of Modernity 'Elizabeth Gralton' , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , December vol. 34 no. 2010;
'An antipodean manifestation of the anti-modern tradition “Remember, this is the country of the duck-billed platypus. When you are cut off from the world, things are bound to develop in interesting ways.” With these words Peter Carey’s character in My Life as a Fake identifies the fundamental factor behind the bizarre aftermath of a literary hoax, namely: particularity of setting. Just as Bob McCorkle, fraudulent creation of Christopher Chubb, comes to life in Carey’s novel to wreak havoc and anguish upon his creator, so too did Ern Malley step out of the imagination of James McAuley and Harold Stewart into Australia of the 1940s, to forge his own place as an almost-person in the history of Australian literature.'
Eliza Hamilton Dunlop's 'The Aboriginal Mother' : Romanticism, Anti Slavery and Imperial Feminism in the Nineteenth Century Katrina Hansord , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-12)
'This paper positions the work of colonial poet Eliza Hamilton Dunlop amongst international Romantic poetry of the period, and argues that Dunlop's poetry reflects a transposition of Romantic women's poetry to Australia. Dunlop's poetry, such as 'The Aboriginal Mother', demonstrates the relationship of Romantic women's poetry to early feminism and Social Reform. As with the work of Felicia Hemans, Dunlop was interested in the role of women, and the 'domestic' as they related to broader national and political concerns. Dunlop seems to have been consciously applying the tropes, such as that of the mother, of anti slavery poetry found within American, British, and international poetic traditions to the Australian aboriginal context. Themes of indigenous motherhood, and also of Sati or widow burning in India, and human rights had been favored by early women's rights campaigners in Britain from the 1820s, focusing on abolition of slavery through the identification of white women with the Negro mother. Dunlop's comparative sympathy for the situation of aboriginals in Australia has been given critical attention as the aspect which makes her work valuable. However, in this essay I hope to outline how Dunlop's poetry fits in to the international context of the engagement of Romantic women poets with Western Imperialist models and colonial Others.' (Author's abstract)
Romanticism's 'Cultural' and 'Literal Bombs' in 'Our Luggage' Carmel Gaffney , 1997 single work criticism
— Appears in: Counterbalancing Light : Essays on the Poetry of Les Murray 1997; (p. 108-122)
‘Deep Hanging Out’ : Native Species Images and Affective Labour 2017 single work
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 17 no. 1 2017;

'This paper investigates the affective labour done by, specifically, native species images in Australian poetry, using Judith Wright's bird poems, and various poems about kangaroos as example. It uses the anthropological term, "deep hanging out", borrowed from an article about fashion models, to extend the idea of affective labour, and to measure poems' attentions to birds and animals, and their relation to iconising as the work of nationalism. It is concerned with cultural capital, and Canberra, and the human empire.'  (Publication abstract)

Last amended 9 Jun 2005 13:20:46
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