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y separately published work icon The Impossible Quest series - author   children's fiction   children's   fantasy  
Issue Details: First known date: 2014... 2014 The Impossible Quest
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Includes

1
y separately published work icon Escape from Wolfhaven Castle Kate Forsyth , Gosford : Scholastic Australia , 2014 7675705 2014 single work children's fiction children's fantasy

'Tell your lord to beware, the wolves smell danger in the wind.

'Wolfhaven Castle has been attacked, and only four escape capture ... Tom, trained to scrub pots, not fight; Elanor, the Lords daughter; Sebastian, a knight in training and Quinn, the witchs apprentice.

'Somehow, if they are to save their people, these unlikely heroes must find four magical beasts from legend. But first, they have to make it out of the castle alive...

'Best-selling, award-winning storyteller, Kate Forsyth, weaves battles, beasts and bravery in this epic new five-book series.' (Publication summary)

2
y separately published work icon Wolves of Witchwood Kate Forsyth , Scholastic Australia , 2014 7979283 2014 single work novel fantasy

'Hunted by Lord Mortlake, Tom, Quinn, Elanor and Sabastian flee for cover. The unicorn leads them into the darkness of the Witchwood, where they meet Wilda the witch. Can she be trusted?

'Danger surrounds, but there's no time to lose. The four unlikely heroes must find the giffin, dragon and sea serpent before it's too late.

'Best-selling, award-winning storyteller Kate Forsyth weaves battles, beasts and bravery in this epic new five-book series. '(Publication summary)

3
y separately published work icon The Beast of Blackmoor Bog Kate Forsyth , Lindfield : Scholastic Australia , 2015 8669113 2015 single work children's fiction children's fantasy

'The dragons are long gone ... this beast is something else.

Something huge and black and hairy.

'After escaping the bog-men in the wilds of the Witchwood, Sebastian, Quinn, Elanor and Tom journey south on their impossible quest.

'Sebastian and Elanor seek help from Crowthorne Castle, but both allies and enemies will reveal themselves. Tom and Quinn venture into the mysterious moors ... where a hideous beast lies in waiting.

'Best-selling, award-winning storyteller Kate Forsyth weaves battles, beasts and bravery in this epic new five-book series.' (Publication summary)

4
y separately published work icon The Drowned Kingdom Kate Forsyth , Lindfield : Scholastic Australia , 2015 8700821 2015 single work children's fiction children's fantasy

'Quinn, Sebastian, Elanor and Tom have found a dragon and conquered the dreaded Beast of Blackmoor Bog. Only one item remains on their impossible quest - the scale of a sea-serpent.

Now they must journey to the drowned kingdom, where they will face their deadliest challenge yet. And there they will uncover the truth behind all that has happened... the truth that will change everything.' (Publication summary)

5
y separately published work icon Battle of the Heroes Kate Forsyth , Lindfield : Scholastic Australia , 2015 8700895 2015 single work children's fiction children's fantasy

'The quest comes to an end as Tom, Quinn, Elanor and Sebastian return to Wolfhaven with their four magical beasts and the gifts they bear. Will they be in time to stop Lord Mortlake's deadly plot?' (Publication summary)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

An Intricate Web : Unweaving Strands of Convention in Children’s Fantasy Series by Australians Caylee Tierney , 2020 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Humanities Review , May no. 66 2020;

'Writing in 2012, Edward James comments that ‘one of the most unexpected developments of the last decade has been the domination of the popular fantasy genre by Australian women (and some Australian men)’ (76; see Wilkins 265). This trend has continued in the years since, with authors such as Emily Rodda, Kate Forsyth, Isobelle Carmody, Jessica Townsend, Garth Nix, John Flanagan, Michael Pryor and Jay Kristoff finding success in Australia and internationally. There is, however, very little distinctively ‘Australian’ about fantasy series by these writers, which largely conform to conventions of the genre that prevail internationally. Unlike Australian literary fiction, which values ‘complex’, original books that celebrate distinctive Australian features (Wilkins 267-9), genres such as fantasy value familiarity and commercial viability (Gelder 13-17, 26-7, 41). James argues that many Australian writers ‘have only been a success because they have been able to market their books to publishers in the UK and USA’ (76). Often, the global outlook of Australian genre fiction writers means publishers do not emphasise the Australian identity of these writers, and their books do not include extrinsically Australian features. In the highly commercial genre fiction industry, failure to adhere to the strict, if evolving, conventions that govern book production in a narrative and professional sense can mean that a writer does not get published, or at the least, does not achieve success in the global market.' (Introduction)

An Intricate Web : Unweaving Strands of Convention in Children’s Fantasy Series by Australians Caylee Tierney , 2020 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Humanities Review , May no. 66 2020;

'Writing in 2012, Edward James comments that ‘one of the most unexpected developments of the last decade has been the domination of the popular fantasy genre by Australian women (and some Australian men)’ (76; see Wilkins 265). This trend has continued in the years since, with authors such as Emily Rodda, Kate Forsyth, Isobelle Carmody, Jessica Townsend, Garth Nix, John Flanagan, Michael Pryor and Jay Kristoff finding success in Australia and internationally. There is, however, very little distinctively ‘Australian’ about fantasy series by these writers, which largely conform to conventions of the genre that prevail internationally. Unlike Australian literary fiction, which values ‘complex’, original books that celebrate distinctive Australian features (Wilkins 267-9), genres such as fantasy value familiarity and commercial viability (Gelder 13-17, 26-7, 41). James argues that many Australian writers ‘have only been a success because they have been able to market their books to publishers in the UK and USA’ (76). Often, the global outlook of Australian genre fiction writers means publishers do not emphasise the Australian identity of these writers, and their books do not include extrinsically Australian features. In the highly commercial genre fiction industry, failure to adhere to the strict, if evolving, conventions that govern book production in a narrative and professional sense can mean that a writer does not get published, or at the least, does not achieve success in the global market.' (Introduction)

Last amended 2 Jun 2020 07:38:18
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