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y separately published work icon Southerly periodical issue   peer reviewed assertion
Alternative title: The Political Imagination : Postcolonialism and Diaspora in Contemporary Australian Poetry
Issue Details: First known date: 2013... vol. 73 no. 1 2013 of Southerly est. 1939 Southerly
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Contents

* Contents derived from the 2013 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
The Political Imagination : Postcolonialism and Diaspora in Contemporary Australian Poetry, Ali Alizadeh , Ann Vickery , single work criticism (p. 7-21)
“Why Waste Lines on Achille?” : Tracing the Critical Discourse on Postcolonial Poetry through Untimeliness to the Present, Lucy Van , single work criticism

'In “Why Waste Lines on Achille?”: Tracing the Critical Discourse on Postcolonial Poetry through Untimeliness to the Present, Lucy Van notes that the scholarship on postcolonial poetry has tended to be somewhat belated to postcolonial studies...' (Vickery and Alizadeh, p 7)

(p. 22-39)
(Un)Belonging in Australia : Poetry and Nation, Lyn McCredden , single work criticism

'What kind of appetite does poetry have for creating new discourses about the nation? This essay will ask if poetry can re-imagine and re-write what are often oppressive and exclusionary national discourses, asking how - historically and in contemporary work - poetry has been concerned with national forms of belonging and unbelonging. Further, the essay will ask whether Australian poetry is able to generate new and even hopeful language in which to think about the nation.' (Author's introduction)

(p. 40-56)
Metapolitics vs. Identity Politics : (Re-)Radicalising the Postcolonial, Penelope Pitt-Alizadeh , Ali Alizadeh , single work criticism

'Postcolonialism may be defined as a theoretical framework for reading and appreciating cultural production between normative Western "forms of social explanation" and "more complex cultural and political boundaries" that demarcate responses to this normativity (Bhabha 248) As such, this framework has been extremely beneficial for, among other things, introducing and highlighting the work of writers from non-Western cultural backgrounds, particularly Indigenous and multicultural or diasporic writers whose works convey conceptual and aesthetic themes and values at once foreign and responsive to Western European literary modalities. Thanks to postcolonial theory and associated methodologies, a very diverse range of writers from a host of cultural origins and locations has been accepted by and incorporated into most, if not all, Western academic and literary milieus.' (Authors' introduction.)

(p. 57-74)
On Asian Australian Poetry, Timothy Yu , single work criticism

'In his essay, Timothy Yu reflects on both the limitations ad possibilities of identifying poetry as 'Asian Australian.' (Vickery and Alizadeh, 11)

(p. 75-88)
Cut Tongue and the Mechanism of Defence (from a work-in-progress), Ania Walwicz , extract prose (p. 89-95)
Breaching the Social Contract : The Migrant Poet and the Politics of Being Apolitical, Danijela Kambaskovic , single work criticism

'In Breaching the Social Contract: The Migrant Poet and the Politics of Being Apolitical , Danijela Kambaskovic writes of the difficulties of returning to poetry in another language and the loaded presumptions surrounding the figure of the migrant poet.' (Vickery and Alizadeh, 14)

(p. 96-122)
A Poetics of (Un)Becoming Hybridity, Adam Aitken , single work criticism

'What is cultural hybridity, and how do the poetics of hybridity inform notions of Australian-Australian, diasporic, or migrant poetries, and how these terms overlap with each other? Popular notions of hyridity include ideas of the post-modern collage and cultural accretion, like fusion food, or something like a festival of world music. Go shopping and you'll find contemporary clothing inspired by Southeast Asian hill tribes, geishas and Vietnamese ao dias. Current use of form in Anglo poetry reveals the popularity of the cento, the ghazal, pantun, haiku and haibun, forms which are, respectively, Latin-Roman, Malay-Arabic, Persian and Asian. Along with god and devil, there is a proliferation of other deities - Chinese, Hindu, Turkish, Tibetan, Vietnamese, Laotian, Malay or Filipino - in our literature now. Accretive hybridity (this proliferation of diverse forms) can resist efforts to impose ownership on this available array of aesthetic techne, and the current on-going tendency for culture to flow globally (facilitated by the Internet and electronic translation tools) feeds this appetite for hybrid exchange and experimentation.' (Author's introduction)

(p. 123-137)
An “Infinitely Flexible” Space : Reading Michael Dransfield’s “Courland Penders” Poems through the Neobaroque and Dobrez’s Theory of “The Pouch”, Michael Farrell , single work criticism

This essay 'seeks to find new ways to address Australian poetry, through the example of Michael Dransfield, a controversially significant poet.' (139)

(p. 138-154)
Archipelagos of Sense : Thinking About a Decolonised Australian Poetics, Peter Minter , single work criticism

'In Archipelagos of Sense: Thinking About a Decolonised Australian Poetics, Peter Minter expands on Les Murray's line that 'the whole world is an archipelago', proffering an archipelagic sensibility where 'locations on the surface of the planet can be understood as earthly temporal and spatial archipelagos'...(Vickery and Alizadeh, 18)

(p. 155-169)
Towns in the Great Desert (3)i"The world has been divided many times over", Peter Boyle , single work poetry (p. 170)
Towns in the Great Desert (4)i"Vertical Town,", Peter Boyle , single work poetry (p. 171)
Belgrade Sunday Lunch (from Journey), Danijela Kambaskovic , single work poetry (p. 172)
Tübingeni"five years since I lived here", Luke Fischer , single work poetry (p. 173)
Washout–Briar–Gulchi"Departing from basalt", Louise Crisp , single work poetry (p. 175-180)
33 3333 182i"February the 27th, 1891", TT. O , single work poetry (p. 182)
Chasing Marie Antoinette All Over Parisi"In the Musee de l'Orangerie", Adrienne Eberhard , single work poetry (p. 183)
I Live Off Youi"A sheep's dick off six figures,", Liam Ferney , single work poetry (p. 184)
In Collectioni"Where does your mind go, watching", Matthew Spencer , single work poetry (p. 185)
Horsebacki"I like the names, the recitations,", Geoff Page , single work poetry (p. 188-189)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Stephen Harris Reviews Southerly: The Political Imagination Stephen Harris , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: Plumwood Mountain [Online] , August 2014;

— Review of Southerly vol. 73 no. 1 2013 periodical issue
Speaking Against Silence : Notes Toward Raising Our Voices Dan Disney , Christopher Kelen , 2014 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Poetry Journal , vol. 4 no. 2 2014; (p. 24-30)
'When people who are less fortunate come to the door, are there imperatives for those born by luck into a safe place? Or is the world simply too small today for hospitality to e extended to those hoping to escape persecution and the imminent threat to life? Are there too many humans in the world for the lucky few to act hospitable? What role do those humans we call poets have when such questions of humanity are to the fore?' (Introduction 25)
Stephen Harris Reviews Southerly: The Political Imagination Stephen Harris , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: Plumwood Mountain [Online] , August 2014;

— Review of Southerly vol. 73 no. 1 2013 periodical issue
Speaking Against Silence : Notes Toward Raising Our Voices Dan Disney , Christopher Kelen , 2014 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Poetry Journal , vol. 4 no. 2 2014; (p. 24-30)
'When people who are less fortunate come to the door, are there imperatives for those born by luck into a safe place? Or is the world simply too small today for hospitality to e extended to those hoping to escape persecution and the imminent threat to life? Are there too many humans in the world for the lucky few to act hospitable? What role do those humans we call poets have when such questions of humanity are to the fore?' (Introduction 25)
Last amended 3 Oct 2013 12:19:25
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