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y separately published work icon In the Heart of the Country single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1977... 1977 In the Heart of the Country
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Adaptations

form y separately published work icon Dust Marion Hänsel , ( dir. Marion Hänsel ) France Belgium : Daska Films Flach Film France 3 Cinéma Man's Films , 1986 8035726 1986 single work film/TV

The isolated lives of a white father and daughter on a South African farm are disrupted by the arrival of black farm-workers, and the resulting racial and sexual tension.

In the Heart of the Country J. M. Coetzee , 2014 single work screenplay
— Appears in: Two Screenplays 2014;

Notes

  • Sections 85-94 have appeared in South Africa in the magazine Standpunte 124, August 1976.
  • Editions and translations have been updated for Disgrace by Eilish Copelin as part of a Semester 2, 2013 scholar's internship. The selection and inclusion of these editions and translations was based on their availability through the search facilities of Libraries Australia andTrove (National Library of Australia), as well as UNESCO's Index Translationum.

    Given the international popularity of Coetzee's work, however, this record may not yet comprehensive. Due to the enormous breadth of critical material on Coetzee's work, indexing of secondary sources is also not complete.

  • Other formats: Also sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Secker and Warburg ,
      1977 .
      Extent: 138p.
      Edition info: First UK ed.
      ISBN: 9780436256707, 0436256703
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Harper and Row ,
      1977 .
      image of person or book cover 7170946608107880780.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Alternative title: From the Heart of the Country
      Extent: 138p.
      Edition info: First US ed.
      Note/s:
      • Published in the US as 'From the Heart of the Country'
      ISBN: 006010841X, 9780060108410
    • Johannesburg,
      c
      South Africa,
      c
      Southern Africa, Africa,
      :
      Ravan Press ,
      1978 .
      Extent: 138p.
      Edition info: First South African ed.
      ISBN: 0869750771, 9780869750773
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Penguin Books ,
      1982 .
      Extent: 138p.
      ISBN: 9780140062281, 0140062289
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Vintage ,
      1999 .
      image of person or book cover 4273502129267206645.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 151p.
      ISBN: 0749394250 (pbk), 9780749394257
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Vintage ,
      2004 .
      image of person or book cover 7693709870271231491.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 151p.
      ISBN: 0099465949, 9780099465942
Alternative title: Au coeur de ce pays
Language: French
    • Paris,
      c
      France,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Éditions Maurice Nadeau ,
      1981 .
      image of person or book cover 2635289434572288398.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 186p.
      Edition info: 1st ed.
      ISBN: 2865410110, 9782865410118
      Series: y separately published work icon Série Domaine étranger Paris : Éditions Maurice Nadeau , 1988 8057681 1988 series - publisher novel Number in series: 2042
    • Paris,
      c
      France,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Éditions Maurice Nadeau ,
      1985 .
      image of person or book cover 7243152689004858922.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 186p.
      Reprinted: 1998
      Note/s:
      • This edition published under the title 'Dust : au cœur de ce pays : roman', and with the following note: "Précédemment paru sous le titre : 'Au cœur de ce pays'".
      ISBN: 2862310352, 29782862310350
    • Paris,
      c
      France,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      C. Bourgois ,
      1989 .
      Extent: 186p.
      ISBN: 2264014121, 9782264014122
      Series: y separately published work icon Série Domaine étranger Paris : Éditions Maurice Nadeau , 1988 8057681 1988 series - publisher novel Number in series: 2042
    • Paris,
      c
      France,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Le Serpent à plumes ,
      1999 .
      image of person or book cover 1779069181472676825.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 222p.
      Reprinted: 2003
      ISBN: 2842611160, 9782842611163
      Series: Motifs series - publisher novel Number in series: 74
    • Paris,
      c
      France,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Editions du Seuil ,
      2006 .
      image of person or book cover 2826481736749549968.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 221p.
      ISBN: 2020676516, 9782020676519
    • Paris,
      c
      France,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Points ,
      2007 .
      image of person or book cover 5502230019315877155.png
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 221p.
      ISBN: 2757807188, 9782757807187
      Series: y separately published work icon Points Paris : Points , 1970 8020796 1970 series - publisher novel Number in series: 1846

Works about this Work

‘In Every Story There Is a Silence’ : Translating Coetzee’s Female Narrators into Italian Franca Cavagnoli , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , February vol. 33 no. 1 2018;

'Translating is not only an exercise in the restoration of meaning. The translator’s true challenge lies in restoring meaning while preserving the way in which that meaning is expressed, because style is what is unique to a text. While working on a book, translators find many obstacles along their path in the form of innate tendencies, that are very difficult to resist and that deform and manipulate the stylistic features of the text. Working on Coetzee’s novels, this is particularly true when the narrator telling the story is a woman, due to specific aspects of translating gender. In my article I will explore some of the issues I faced when I translated into Italian two of Coetzee’s novels, In the Heart of the Country (1978) and Foe (1986). On one side, in telling Magda’s and Susan’s stories in Italian, the translator has to resist the temptation to rationalise the narrator’s language or to fill in the silence pervading the two novels just to make the text more coherent. And on the other side, she has to find a suitable language with regard to both diction and syntax, and to look for a way to address the question of what Magda calls ‘the pronouns of intimacy’, when the female and the colonised subject are marginalised by patriarchal authority.'  (Publication abstract)

In the Heart of the Country and Pain : Re-reading Space, Gender and Affect Michela Borzaga , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , February vol. 33 no. 1 2018;

'This essay offers a new spatial reading of In the Heart of the Country. It explores J. M. Coetzee’s interest in grounding white female narrators in heterotopic spaces which, while marked by terror and racial divisions, simultaneously enforce proximity and intimacy across the racial bar. It shows that grounding Magda within the specific phenomenology of the farm enables Coetzee to explore a set of traumatic double-binds which are not only discursive but also sensorial, psychic as well as affective. It concludes by arguing that the strong self-referentiality of the novel can itself be read as an affective symptom, the trace of psychic parceling which happens at the intersection of space, symbol and traumatic power relations.'  (Publication abstract)

Magda Meets Theodora : Language and Interiority in The Aunt’s Story and In The Heart of the Country Bill Ashcroft , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , February vol. 33 no. 1 2018;

'In ‘Orders of Discourse’ Foucault raises the deeply embedded opposition between reason and folly: ‘From the depths of the Middle Ages a man was mad if his speech could not be said to form part of the common discourse of men’. This discursive rule becomes magnified in the case of women and of the colonised. In Coetzee’s In the Heart of the Country and Patrick White’s The Aunt’s Story, Magda and Theodora demonstrate the precarious marginality of the colonial woman. They are doubly marginalised as colonial women, existing outside settler history, which is the narrative both of the masculine responsibilities of settlement and an attendant sense of displacement. In Coetzee’s novel, Magda plays out a version of The Tempest in which she is subjected both to the Law of the Father and to Caliban, while in The Aunt’s Story Theodora plots a determined path out of the discourse of men into the ambivalently liberating horizon of madness. The differences between the women say as much as the similarities, but both offer a compelling version of the layered marginalities of the female colonial subject. In the writers’ hands the place outside discourse, the peculiar language of the colonial women, becomes the potential location of counter discourse. This essay proposes that the women demonstrate a radical interiority, a capacity to inhabit the lives of others in a way that is considered madness but which enacts the utopian function of literature itself.' (Publication abstract)

Restoring Madness to History in J.M. Coetzee’s In the Heart of the Country 2014 single work
— Appears in: MediaTropes , vol. 4 no. 2 2014; (p. 46-67)
'This article interrogates the curious dismissal of madness from the critical landscape surrounding J. M. Coetzee’s In the Heart of the Country, and makes suggestions concerning how madness works in the novel and why—given certain critical and historical pressures—it has been persistently sidelined. An analysis of the novel in light of Coetzee’s scholarship on Samuel Beckett suggests that Magda’s discourse, like those of many Beckettian narrators, follows patterns of affirmation and auto-negation, constituting a fiction of what Coetzee calls “net zero.” In particular, Magda extends this pattern to the taking on and casting off of identities, perhaps in the style of the hermit crab she puts forward as an image of herself. An intertextual examination of the semantic and rhetorical range of madness as it appears in Coetzee’s other fiction and scholarship reveals that madness, for Coetzee, consistently denotes: on the one hand, a contagious force moving throughout a social body, and on the other hand, the labor of writing under the threat of illegibility—a threat conditioned in large part by the madness of the social body. By infecting the writer who might record its workings in history and thereby inhibiting or distorting that record, madness likewise appears in historical record as “net zero.” Thus, rather than simply being mad, Magda’s relationship with madness is emblematic of the (dis)appearance of madness in and from history.' (Publication abstract)
Horizons Not Only of Expectation : Lessons from In the Heart of the Country Martina Ghosh-Schellhorn , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Approaches to Teaching Coetzee's Disgrace and Other Works 2014; (p. 49-58)
The Gate Deferred : J.M. Coetzee and the Battle Against Doubt Scott Esposito , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 73 no. 3 2013; (p. 90-111)
'Esposito writes of Coetzee's characters (it is not Elizabeth Costello alone) in effect morally naked at the Gate, awaiting admission after - or so they think - the passing of a last judgement, but what is it that is expected of them, and what is this a gate to? (David Brooks, 'Editorial' p. 6)
Horizons Not Only of Expectation : Lessons from In the Heart of the Country Martina Ghosh-Schellhorn , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Approaches to Teaching Coetzee's Disgrace and Other Works 2014; (p. 49-58)
Restoring Madness to History in J.M. Coetzee’s In the Heart of the Country 2014 single work
— Appears in: MediaTropes , vol. 4 no. 2 2014; (p. 46-67)
'This article interrogates the curious dismissal of madness from the critical landscape surrounding J. M. Coetzee’s In the Heart of the Country, and makes suggestions concerning how madness works in the novel and why—given certain critical and historical pressures—it has been persistently sidelined. An analysis of the novel in light of Coetzee’s scholarship on Samuel Beckett suggests that Magda’s discourse, like those of many Beckettian narrators, follows patterns of affirmation and auto-negation, constituting a fiction of what Coetzee calls “net zero.” In particular, Magda extends this pattern to the taking on and casting off of identities, perhaps in the style of the hermit crab she puts forward as an image of herself. An intertextual examination of the semantic and rhetorical range of madness as it appears in Coetzee’s other fiction and scholarship reveals that madness, for Coetzee, consistently denotes: on the one hand, a contagious force moving throughout a social body, and on the other hand, the labor of writing under the threat of illegibility—a threat conditioned in large part by the madness of the social body. By infecting the writer who might record its workings in history and thereby inhibiting or distorting that record, madness likewise appears in historical record as “net zero.” Thus, rather than simply being mad, Magda’s relationship with madness is emblematic of the (dis)appearance of madness in and from history.' (Publication abstract)
Magda Meets Theodora : Language and Interiority in The Aunt’s Story and In The Heart of the Country Bill Ashcroft , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , February vol. 33 no. 1 2018;

'In ‘Orders of Discourse’ Foucault raises the deeply embedded opposition between reason and folly: ‘From the depths of the Middle Ages a man was mad if his speech could not be said to form part of the common discourse of men’. This discursive rule becomes magnified in the case of women and of the colonised. In Coetzee’s In the Heart of the Country and Patrick White’s The Aunt’s Story, Magda and Theodora demonstrate the precarious marginality of the colonial woman. They are doubly marginalised as colonial women, existing outside settler history, which is the narrative both of the masculine responsibilities of settlement and an attendant sense of displacement. In Coetzee’s novel, Magda plays out a version of The Tempest in which she is subjected both to the Law of the Father and to Caliban, while in The Aunt’s Story Theodora plots a determined path out of the discourse of men into the ambivalently liberating horizon of madness. The differences between the women say as much as the similarities, but both offer a compelling version of the layered marginalities of the female colonial subject. In the writers’ hands the place outside discourse, the peculiar language of the colonial women, becomes the potential location of counter discourse. This essay proposes that the women demonstrate a radical interiority, a capacity to inhabit the lives of others in a way that is considered madness but which enacts the utopian function of literature itself.' (Publication abstract)

In the Heart of the Country and Pain : Re-reading Space, Gender and Affect Michela Borzaga , 2018 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , February vol. 33 no. 1 2018;

'This essay offers a new spatial reading of In the Heart of the Country. It explores J. M. Coetzee’s interest in grounding white female narrators in heterotopic spaces which, while marked by terror and racial divisions, simultaneously enforce proximity and intimacy across the racial bar. It shows that grounding Magda within the specific phenomenology of the farm enables Coetzee to explore a set of traumatic double-binds which are not only discursive but also sensorial, psychic as well as affective. It concludes by arguing that the strong self-referentiality of the novel can itself be read as an affective symptom, the trace of psychic parceling which happens at the intersection of space, symbol and traumatic power relations.'  (Publication abstract)

Last amended 1 Feb 2018 13:26:19
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