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Issue Details: First known date: 2019... 2019 Arab, Australian, Other : Stories on Race and Identity
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Although there are 22 separate Arab nationalities representing an enormous variety of cultural backgrounds and experiences, the portrayal of Arabs in Australia tends to range from homogenising (at best) to racist pop-culture caricatures.

'Edited by award-winning author and academic Randa Abdel-Fattah, and activist and poet Sara Saleh, and featuring contributors Michael Mohammed Ahmad, Ruby Hamad and Paula Abood, among many others, this collection explores the experience of living as a member of the Arab diaspora in Australia and includes stories of family, ethnicity, history, isolation, belonging and identity.'  (Publication summary)
 

Contents

* Contents derived from the Sydney, New South Wales,:Pan Macmillan Australia , 2019 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Introduction, Randa Abdel-Fattah , Sara Saleh , single work autobiography (p. 1-6)
The Third Time I Broke My Father's Heart, Ruby Hamad , single work autobiography (p. 7-14)
Coming Out Palestinian, Elias Jahshan , single work autobiography (p. 15-28)
Here, at Home, Lamisse Hamouda , single work poetry (p. 29-32)
Aerobics for Arabs, Sara El Sayed , single work autobiography (p. 33-42)
Ros Bil Laban, Yassir Morsi , single work autobiography (p. 43-54)
The Personal Disclosures of a Young Refugee, Rooan Al Kalmashi , single work autobiography (p. 55-60)
Single Arab Female, single work autobiography (p. 61-70)
Once Upon a Time in the Diapora, Paula Abood , single work autobiography essay (p. 71-82)
Racism and Recipes, Ryan Al-Natour , single work autobiography (p. 83-94)
The Pleasure and Privilege of Painting Flowers, Amani Haydar , single work autobiography (p. 95-106)
Blue-label Memoirs, Miran Hosny , single work autobiography (p. 107-114)
Call Me by My Name, Zainab Kadhim , Mohammad Awad , single work poetry (p. 115-122)
The Origin of Leb, Michael Mohammed Ahmad , single work autobiography (p. 123-146)
Islam : Reclaiming the Narrative, Hana Assafiri , single work autobiography essay (p. 147-156)
One of a Kind, Lora Inak , single work autobiography (p. 157-166)
Of 'Middle-Eastern Appearance', Omar Bensaidi , single work autobiography (p. 167-172)
You Don't Look Lebanese, Nicola Joseph , Huna Amweero , single work autobiography
A mother-daughter conversation on decolonising Arab identity on stolen land.
(p. 173-188)
Holding the Line, Farid Farid , single work autobiography (p. 189-196)
Pride, Prejudice and Pining, Sarah Ayoub , single work autobiography (p. 197-208)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Connection across Lines Louise Omer , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 7 September 2019; (p. 20)

— Review of Arab, Australian, Other : Stories on Race and Identity 2019 anthology autobiography

'Western understanding of the Middle East, wrote Edward Said in his 1978 book Orientalism, had long been constructed in ­binary opposition to the West. Dividing lines were drawn to serve the dominant colonising power. The Arab world was ­defined as sensuous, uncivilised, depraved, other.' (Introduction)

Connection across Lines Louise Omer , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 7 September 2019; (p. 20)

— Review of Arab, Australian, Other : Stories on Race and Identity 2019 anthology autobiography

'Western understanding of the Middle East, wrote Edward Said in his 1978 book Orientalism, had long been constructed in ­binary opposition to the West. Dividing lines were drawn to serve the dominant colonising power. The Arab world was ­defined as sensuous, uncivilised, depraved, other.' (Introduction)

Last amended 9 Oct 2019 12:54:25
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