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Eumeralla : A War Requiem for Peace single work   musical theatre  
Issue Details: First known date: 2018... 2018 Eumeralla : A War Requiem for Peace
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'There is no memorial to the Eumeralla War. No Australian Prime Minister has ever visited the battleground. The history of battles fought over a period of 23 years have drawn a deafening silence in the 170 years since the last shots rang out. While the Gunditjmara people have language and ceremony to honour their fallen heroes those on the other side of the conflict have no language to describe their ancestors fate. Unlike other conflicts in which Australians have fought and died no peace was ever declared in the Eumeralla War. In providing the opportunity for a largely non-Indigenous choir to learn a major choral work entirely in the ancient language of the Gunditjmara people, Eumeralla will create a powerful way to engage and enlighten those unfamiliar with the history of the resistance wars. Unlike other Australian war heroes, those who died in the resistance wars are not acknowledged in contemporary Australian society. This work will recognise the lives lost on both sides of the fighting and allow peace to be declared. In the long term, the work will become a resource for language preservation, historical data and education. It will become a vehicle for other musical organisations to present a work that engages with Australia’s Indigenous history, exposing the wider Australian community to our shared history by expressing Indigenous culture in a meaningful and powerful way. The traditional languages of the continent are the key to understanding our connection to this land in 21st century Australia.' (Production summary)

Production Details

  • First performed  on 14 October 2018 at Southcombe Park Stadium, Port Fairy, Victoria.

    Instrumentation: Solo soprano voice, solo mezzo-soprano voice, solo baritone voice, children's choir, chamber choir, chamber ensemble.

    Featuring Deborah Cheetham, Linda Barcan, Don Bemrose, Plexus Ensemble, Dhungala Children's Choir, The Consort of Melbourne.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

In a Notoriously Sexist Art Form, Australian Women Composers Are Making Their Voices Heard Karen Cummings , 2019 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 22 May 2019;

'Classical music has traditionally not been a welcoming environment for women composers. Opera Australia’s 2019 season, for instance, features just one work by a female composer, Elena Kats-Chernin.'

Requiem Inspired by the Spirits of a Haunted Land Darren Coyne , 2018 single work column
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 17 October no. 687 2018; (p. 16)

' Yorta Yorta composer Deborah Cheetham has created a new work that is sung in the ancient dialects of the Gunditjmara people.' 

Requiem Inspired by the Spirits of a Haunted Land Darren Coyne , 2018 single work column
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 17 October no. 687 2018; (p. 16)

' Yorta Yorta composer Deborah Cheetham has created a new work that is sung in the ancient dialects of the Gunditjmara people.' 

In a Notoriously Sexist Art Form, Australian Women Composers Are Making Their Voices Heard Karen Cummings , 2019 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 22 May 2019;

'Classical music has traditionally not been a welcoming environment for women composers. Opera Australia’s 2019 season, for instance, features just one work by a female composer, Elena Kats-Chernin.'

Last amended 31 Oct 2018 10:36:14
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