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y separately published work icon The Mabo Turn in Australian Fiction multi chapter work   criticism  
Issue Details: First known date: 2017... 2017 The Mabo Turn in Australian Fiction
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'This is the first in-depth, broad-based study of the impact of the Australian High Court’s landmark Mabo decision of 1992 on Australian fiction. More than any other event in Australia’s legal, political and cultural history, the Mabo judgement – which recognised indigenous Australians’ customary «native title» to land – challenged previous ways of thinking about land and space, settlement and belonging, race and relationships, and nation and history, both historically and contemporaneously. While Mabo’s impact on history, law, politics and film has been the focus of scholarly attention, the study of its influence on literature has been sporadic and largely limited to examinations of non-Aboriginal novels.

'Now, a quarter of a century after Mabo, this book takes a closer look at nineteen contemporary novels – including works by David Malouf, Alex Miller, Kate Grenville, Thea Astley, Tim Winton, Michelle de Kretser, Richard Flanagan, Alexis Wright and Kim Scott – in order to define and describe Australia’s literary imaginary as it reflects and articulates post-Mabo discourse today. Indeed, literature’s substantial engagement with Mabo’s cultural legacy – the acknowledgement of indigenous people’s presence in the land, in history, and in public affairs, as opposed to their absence – demands a re-writing of literary history to account for a “Mabo turn” in Australian fiction. ' (Publication summary)

Notes

  • Table of Contents : 

    - Four Core Post-Mabo Novels

    - Re-writing the Past: Mabo and History

    - Re-writing the Present: Mabo and Contemporary Australia

    - Sovereignty: Mabo and Aboriginal-Authored Fiction

    - Conclusion: Dominant, Residual and Emergent Cultures

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Oxford, Oxfordshire,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Peter Lang ,
      2017 .
      image of person or book cover 378038970834928247.jpg
      This image has been sourced from Booktopia
      Extent: 266p.
      ISBN: 9781787072640
      Series: y separately published work icon Australian Studies : Interdisciplinary Perspectives Anne Brewster (editor), Oxford : Peter Lang , 2017 13852684 2017 series - publisher criticism

      'This interdisciplinary book series showcases dynamic, innovative research on contemporary and historical Australian culture. It aims to foster interventions in established debates on Australia as well as opening up new areas of enquiry that reflect the diversity of interests in the scholarly community. The series includes research in a range of fields across the humanities and social sciences, such as history, literature, media, philosophy, cultural studies, gender studies and politics. Proposals are encouraged in areas such as Indigenous studies, critical race and whiteness studies, women’s studies, studies in colonialism and coloniality, multiculturalism, the experimental humanities and ecocriticism. Of particular interest is research that promotes the study of Australia in cross-cultural, transnational and comparative contexts. Cross-disciplinarity and new methodologies are welcomed. The series will feature the work of leading authors but also invites proposals from emerging scholars. Proposals for monographs and high-quality edited volumes are welcomed. Proposals and manuscripts considered for the series will be subject to rigorous peer review and editorial attention. The series is affiliated with the International Australian Studies Association.' (Publication summary)

      Number in series: 1

Works about this Work

Geoff Rodoreda's The Mabo Turn in Australian Fiction Travis Franks , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 3 no. 18 2018;

— Review of The Mabo Turn in Australian Fiction Geoff Rodoreda , 2017 multi chapter work criticism

'Geoff Rodoreda earned his PhD from the University of Stuttgart, Germany, where he is now a lecturer in the English literature department. His first book, The Mabo Turn in Australian Fiction, is the result of Rodoreda’s doctoral project, with portions of some chapters having appeared in journals and anthologies published in Australia and Germany. Prior to his academic pursuits, Rodoreda worked in Adelaide and Darwin as a journalist for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.'  (Introduction)

[Review Essay] The Mabo Turn in Australian Fiction Lukas Klik , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , vol. 43 no. 4 2018; (p. 540-542)

'Without a doubt, the High Court Mabo decision of 1992 represents one of the defining moments in recent Australian history, since it has re-evaluated the relationship between Indigenous and settler-Australians. Yet, despite its significance for the nation as a whole, its consequences for Australia’s literary production, in contrast to its effects on the country’s cultural production more generally (a fully-fledged study on the effects of the Mabo decision on Australian film already appeared in 2004), have only been studied in patches. With his recent study The Mabo Turn in Australian Fiction (2018), which is based on his PhD project conducted at the University of Stuttgart, Germany, Geoff Rodoreda attends to this neglect and offers a highly readable account of the ways in which Australian literature has responded to the changed political, cultural and emotional landscapes after Mabo.' (Introduction)

Geoff Rodoreda's The Mabo Turn in Australian Fiction Travis Franks , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 3 no. 18 2018;

— Review of The Mabo Turn in Australian Fiction Geoff Rodoreda , 2017 multi chapter work criticism

'Geoff Rodoreda earned his PhD from the University of Stuttgart, Germany, where he is now a lecturer in the English literature department. His first book, The Mabo Turn in Australian Fiction, is the result of Rodoreda’s doctoral project, with portions of some chapters having appeared in journals and anthologies published in Australia and Germany. Prior to his academic pursuits, Rodoreda worked in Adelaide and Darwin as a journalist for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.'  (Introduction)

[Review Essay] The Mabo Turn in Australian Fiction Lukas Klik , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , vol. 43 no. 4 2018; (p. 540-542)

'Without a doubt, the High Court Mabo decision of 1992 represents one of the defining moments in recent Australian history, since it has re-evaluated the relationship between Indigenous and settler-Australians. Yet, despite its significance for the nation as a whole, its consequences for Australia’s literary production, in contrast to its effects on the country’s cultural production more generally (a fully-fledged study on the effects of the Mabo decision on Australian film already appeared in 2004), have only been studied in patches. With his recent study The Mabo Turn in Australian Fiction (2018), which is based on his PhD project conducted at the University of Stuttgart, Germany, Geoff Rodoreda attends to this neglect and offers a highly readable account of the ways in which Australian literature has responded to the changed political, cultural and emotional landscapes after Mabo.' (Introduction)

Last amended 10 Oct 2018 11:47:20
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