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Issue Details: First known date: 2016... 2016 'A Passion for Exploring New Countries' : Matthew Flinders & George Bass
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'‘Australian history … does not read like history’, Mark Twain complained in 1897, ‘but like the most beautiful lies … It is full of surprises and adventures, incongruities, and contradictions, and incredibilities; but they are all true, they all happened.’ He might have been thinking of Matthew Flinders and George Bass, two obscure young men from Lincolnshire, who had arrived in Sydney in 1795 determined to achieve greatness.

'Flinders wanted to be an explorer ‘second only to Cook’, Bass a naturalist, another Sir Joseph Banks, and a rich Sydney trader. For eight years these two pursued their destiny. Their voyages changed the map of Australia, and Flinders gave it its name. They were ready for even greater ventures.

'And then it was all over. Bass had set out on a voyage he would never finish. His life ended when he was thirty-two years old. Flinders was standing bareheaded and bedraggled before the governor of Ile de France (Mauritius), who told him that his claim to be the commander of a great expedition of discovery was frankly incredible, all lies; he was thrust into prison as a spy and detained for nearly seven years. His career as an explorer ended when he was twenty-nine years old. But a strange new adventure was just beginning …

'Their incredible story is all true – everything in it did happen. This book is historically rigorous, yet its protagonists’ fascinating and contrasting characters, the powerful background of the Napoleonic War, and the extraordinary events of their lives make it as gripping as any novel.' (Publication summary)

Notes

  • For Grahame, in love and gratitude

    --and always remembering S., 20/2/1975 - 10/7/1994

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • North Melbourne, Flemington - North Melbourne area, Melbourne - North, Melbourne, Victoria,: Australian Scholarly Publishing , 2016 .
      image of person or book cover 3327358085886331682.gif
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: xiii, 303 p, 10 unnumbered pages of platesp.
      Description: col. illus. maps.
      Note/s:
      • Published November 2016
      ISBN: 9781925333725

Works about this Work

[Review Essay] : Josephine Bastian, ‘A Passion for Exploring New Countries’: Matthew Flinders and George Bass Peter Ashley , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Transnational Literature , May vol. 9 no. 2 2017;
'I have researched the life and times of Matthew Flinders for nearly 20 years in order to raise the profile of this most important English explorer so that he might stand alongside the likes of James Cook, William Bligh, Arthur Phillip, and John Franklin. This review is written from that standpoint – with the added ingredient of including George Bass. This book, by Sydney-based teacher author and editor Josephine Bastion, is a first-class example, with some minor faults, of the history of the birth of Australia in the age of Enlightenment. It would have made a greater impact if it had been published in 2014 to coincide with the bicentenary of Flinders’ passing. Nevertheless, the account is a work of scholarship based on good research in the relevant archives. It is a pleasure to read, using prose that has been written to be read rather than to impress.' (Publication summary)
[Review Essay] : Josephine Bastian, ‘A Passion for Exploring New Countries’: Matthew Flinders and George Bass Peter Ashley , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Transnational Literature , May vol. 9 no. 2 2017;
'I have researched the life and times of Matthew Flinders for nearly 20 years in order to raise the profile of this most important English explorer so that he might stand alongside the likes of James Cook, William Bligh, Arthur Phillip, and John Franklin. This review is written from that standpoint – with the added ingredient of including George Bass. This book, by Sydney-based teacher author and editor Josephine Bastion, is a first-class example, with some minor faults, of the history of the birth of Australia in the age of Enlightenment. It would have made a greater impact if it had been published in 2014 to coincide with the bicentenary of Flinders’ passing. Nevertheless, the account is a work of scholarship based on good research in the relevant archives. It is a pleasure to read, using prose that has been written to be read rather than to impress.' (Publication summary)
Last amended 20 Mar 2018 08:39:36
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