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y separately published work icon The Sky So Heavy single work   novel   young adult  
Issue Details: First known date: 2013... 2013 The Sky So Heavy
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'For Fin, it’s just like any other day – racing for the school bus, bluffing his way through class and trying to remain cool in front of the most sophisticated girl in his universe. Only it’s not like any other day because, on the other side of the world, nuclear missiles are being detonated.

'When Fin wakes up the next morning, it’s dark, bitterly cold and snow is falling. There’s no internet, no phone, no TV, no power and no parents. Nothing Fin’s learnt in school could have prepared him for this.

'With his parents missing and dwindling food and water supplies, Fin and his younger brother, Max, must find a way to survive in a nuclear winter … all on their own.

'When things are at their most desperate, where can you go for help?'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Exhibitions

12322488
11021082

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Teachers’ notes from publisher’s website.

Notes

  • Dedication: for Nathan, always.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

The Perfect Place to Set a Novel about the End of the World? Trends in Australian Post-Nuclear Fiction for Young Adults Elizabeth Braithwaite , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Bookbird , vol. 53 no. 2 2015; (p. 22-29)
'"Australia has a fascinating yet contradictory nuclear history," writes Jeffrey Lantis, and this ambiguity can be seen in the post-nuclear young adult fiction produced in that country. British, American and German speculative fiction for young readers set after nuclear disaster tends to suggest reasons for the disaster, and by implication, to position readers towards acting to stop the disaster happening in the real world. By contrast, Australian writers of both fantasy and speculative fiction tend to be less concerned with the cause of the disaster than with how the nuclear apocalypse can be used to explore a range of cultural issues which may appear to have little or nothing to do with nuclear disaster. Working with the notion of apocalypse as both revelation and, more popularly, as a violent "end event" (Curtis), this paper explores why young adult post-nuclear fiction produced in Australia tends to be different from that produced in Britain, the USA and Germany, and demonstrates how the nuclear disaster is used in a selection of Australian young adult post-disaster fiction to address cultural issues, particularly those dealing with Australia's Indigenous population, and with the contemporary treatment of refugees.' (Publication summary)
Book Review: The Sky So Heavy by Claire Zorn Amelia Cox , 2015 2015 single work review
— Appears in: The NSW Writers' Centre Blog

— Review of The Sky So Heavy Claire Zorn , 2013 single work novel
An Unflinching Dissection of Human Behavior : Lisa Wardle Reviews ‘The Sky So Heavy’ by Claire Zorn Lisa Wardle , 2015 single work review
— Appears in: Rochford Street Review , October 2014 – March no. 13 2015;

— Review of The Sky So Heavy Claire Zorn , 2013 single work novel
Judges Comments on the Winner and Honour Books : Older Readers 2014 single work column
— Appears in: Reading Time , August 2014;
Writing Their Way to Fame Katharine England , 2014 single work column
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 12 April 2014; (p. 58)
[Review] The Sky So Heavy Kate Sunners , 2013 single work review
— Appears in: Books + Publishing , April vol. 92 no. 5 2013; (p. 15)

— Review of The Sky So Heavy Claire Zorn , 2013 single work novel
[Review] The Sky So Heavy Katharine England , 2013 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 9 November vol. 9 November no. 2013; (p. 20)

— Review of The Sky So Heavy Claire Zorn , 2013 single work novel
[Review] The Sky So Heavy Jo Burnell , 2013 single work review
— Appears in: Good Reading , October 2013; (p. 64)

— Review of The Sky So Heavy Claire Zorn , 2013 single work novel
An Unflinching Dissection of Human Behavior : Lisa Wardle Reviews ‘The Sky So Heavy’ by Claire Zorn Lisa Wardle , 2015 single work review
— Appears in: Rochford Street Review , October 2014 – March no. 13 2015;

— Review of The Sky So Heavy Claire Zorn , 2013 single work novel
The Sky So Heavy by Claire Zorn Jo Antareau , 2013 single work review
— Appears in: Buzz Words , September 2013;

— Review of The Sky So Heavy Claire Zorn , 2013 single work novel
Writing Their Way to Fame Katharine England , 2014 single work column
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 12 April 2014; (p. 58)
Judges Comments on the Winner and Honour Books : Older Readers 2014 single work column
— Appears in: Reading Time , August 2014;
The Perfect Place to Set a Novel about the End of the World? Trends in Australian Post-Nuclear Fiction for Young Adults Elizabeth Braithwaite , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Bookbird , vol. 53 no. 2 2015; (p. 22-29)
'"Australia has a fascinating yet contradictory nuclear history," writes Jeffrey Lantis, and this ambiguity can be seen in the post-nuclear young adult fiction produced in that country. British, American and German speculative fiction for young readers set after nuclear disaster tends to suggest reasons for the disaster, and by implication, to position readers towards acting to stop the disaster happening in the real world. By contrast, Australian writers of both fantasy and speculative fiction tend to be less concerned with the cause of the disaster than with how the nuclear apocalypse can be used to explore a range of cultural issues which may appear to have little or nothing to do with nuclear disaster. Working with the notion of apocalypse as both revelation and, more popularly, as a violent "end event" (Curtis), this paper explores why young adult post-nuclear fiction produced in Australia tends to be different from that produced in Britain, the USA and Germany, and demonstrates how the nuclear disaster is used in a selection of Australian young adult post-disaster fiction to address cultural issues, particularly those dealing with Australia's Indigenous population, and with the contemporary treatment of refugees.' (Publication summary)
Last amended 7 Dec 2018 05:50:35
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