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Is part of New Directions in Australian Literary Studies? : A Preliminary Discussion in Three Articles Leigh Dale , Gillian Whitlock , David Carter , 1999 sequence criticism
Issue Details: First known date: 1999... 1999 Good Readers and Good Citizens : Literature, Media and the Nation
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Australian Literary Studies ALS vol. 19 no. 2 October 1999 Z589453 1999 periodical issue 1999 pg. 136-151
  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Always Almost Modern : Australian Print Cultures and Modernity David Carter , Melbourne : Australian Scholarly Publishing , 2013 6479433 2013 multi chapter work criticism

    'Was Australian culture born modern or has it always been behind the game, never quite modern enough? Was it always already or only always almost modern? David Carter’s essays examine the complex engagements of Australian writers, artists, editors and consumers with 20th-century modernity, social and political crisis, and the impact of modernisms. Always Almost Modern ranges from the great mid-century novels of authors such as Eleanor Dark and M. Barnard Eldershaw to the unprecedented bestseller that was They’re a Weird Mob, from famous to largely forgotten local magazines and to film and television, and from the avant-garde to nationalism, communism and the middlebrow. Chapters engage with key themes in contemporary literary and cultural studies, exploring new ways of understanding Australian culture in terms of its modernity and transnationalism.' (Publisher's blurb)

    Melbourne : Australian Scholarly Publishing , 2013
    pg. 253-272

Works about this Work

‘Reading and Writing to Learn’ : The Problem of Poetry Bonny Cassidy , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 293-306)
'Bonnie Cassidy argues that when teachers are 'faced with the problem of how to read and discuss poetry in Australia...thought and time might be better spent on encouraging confidence in poetry as a relevant medium and substance of our times. Specifically, ...to look at young Australian to enact this regeneration - and schools as the site in which that process will take place, grounding the work of universities.' Cassidy also states in this chapter she will interpret the role that poetry might play in The Australian Curriculum: English, including some of the challenges that the Curriculum poses for a revision of approaches to poetry in schools.' (294)
Teaching Small ‘l’ Literature : Lessons from English in Australia Brenton Doecke , Douglas McClenaghan , Lauren Petis , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 266-306)
'This essay is structured around quotations taken from early issues of English in Australia, the journal of the Australian Association for the Teaching of English (AATE), when that journal played a significant role in the formation of a professional discourse for English teachers at a time of rapid expansion of secondary education during the post-war years. We enter into a dialogue with contributors to these early issues in order to test the currency of their values and beliefs today. What is their attitude towards the teaching of literature in Australia? What are their views specifically with regard to the place of Australian writing in the secondary English curriculum? Does English still have anything in common with what contributors to these early issues understood the subject to be? We are posing these questions, not out of some musty interest in the ghosts of debates past, but in an effort to create a perspective on the present, and to think outside the mental cage of standards-based reforms and construction of subject English that is currently being foisted on the profession by the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA).' (Authors' introduction, p. 266)
Australian Literature and the Cultural Dimensions of Globalisation Robert Dixon , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory 2010; (p. 115-126)

'Robert Dixon focuses on the present as a key moment of transformation in Australian literary and cultural as it moves from its founding 'nationalist' moment into a transnational framing of key issues.' Source: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory (2010)

New Directions : Introduction Leigh Dale , 1999 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 19 no. 2 1999; (p. 131-135)
Australian Literature and the Cultural Dimensions of Globalisation Robert Dixon , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory 2010; (p. 115-126)

'Robert Dixon focuses on the present as a key moment of transformation in Australian literary and cultural as it moves from its founding 'nationalist' moment into a transnational framing of key issues.' Source: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory (2010)

Teaching Small ‘l’ Literature : Lessons from English in Australia Brenton Doecke , Douglas McClenaghan , Lauren Petis , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 266-306)
'This essay is structured around quotations taken from early issues of English in Australia, the journal of the Australian Association for the Teaching of English (AATE), when that journal played a significant role in the formation of a professional discourse for English teachers at a time of rapid expansion of secondary education during the post-war years. We enter into a dialogue with contributors to these early issues in order to test the currency of their values and beliefs today. What is their attitude towards the teaching of literature in Australia? What are their views specifically with regard to the place of Australian writing in the secondary English curriculum? Does English still have anything in common with what contributors to these early issues understood the subject to be? We are posing these questions, not out of some musty interest in the ghosts of debates past, but in an effort to create a perspective on the present, and to think outside the mental cage of standards-based reforms and construction of subject English that is currently being foisted on the profession by the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA).' (Authors' introduction, p. 266)
‘Reading and Writing to Learn’ : The Problem of Poetry Bonny Cassidy , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 293-306)
'Bonnie Cassidy argues that when teachers are 'faced with the problem of how to read and discuss poetry in Australia...thought and time might be better spent on encouraging confidence in poetry as a relevant medium and substance of our times. Specifically, ...to look at young Australian to enact this regeneration - and schools as the site in which that process will take place, grounding the work of universities.' Cassidy also states in this chapter she will interpret the role that poetry might play in The Australian Curriculum: English, including some of the challenges that the Curriculum poses for a revision of approaches to poetry in schools.' (294)
New Directions : Introduction Leigh Dale , 1999 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 19 no. 2 1999; (p. 131-135)
Last amended 13 Mar 2014 11:02:56
136-151 Good Readers and Good Citizens : Literature, Media and the Nationsmall AustLit logo Australian Literary Studies
253-272 Good Readers and Good Citizens : Literature, Media and the Nationsmall AustLit logo
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