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y separately published work icon The Tapu of Banderah selected work   short story   adventure  
Issue Details: First known date: 1901... 1901 The Tapu of Banderah
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Contents

* Contents derived from the London,
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England,
c
c
United Kingdom (UK),
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Western Europe, Europe,
:
C. Arthur Pearson , 1901 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
The Tapu of Banderah, Louis Becke , Walter James Jeffery , 1896 single work short story

The small European population of the island of Mayou, off the coast of Papua New Guinea, is intrigued to see a yacht approaching the island. The two passengers appear to be respectable 'gentleman', but the trader Blount soon recognises the captain of the ship as one Captain Sykes, a notorious blackbirder who has served time in prison in Sydney for his activities. The chief of the island, Banderah, has his own grievance against Sykes and plots revenge. Blount uncovers a conspiracy between the visitors and the other two traders living on Mayou and he and Banderah devise a scheme to expose them. However, the plan goes hideously wrong and leads to bloodshed and death.

(p. 2-44)
The Beginning of the Sea Story of Australia, Louis Becke , Walter James Jeffery , 1901 single work prose

Becke claims the work of sailors in colonising Australia has been overshadowed by tales of the outback and the goldfields. He argues that the ocean is integral to the early history of Australia and points out that the first four governors of Australia were were Navy captains and that much of the outback was peopled by runaway sailors, whom he claims were more skilled and adaptable than ticket-of-leave convicts and free emigrants. He also tells the stories of sea explorers such as Bass and Flinders and the whalers who charted the seas around eastern Australasia and the Pacific, as well as some remarkable tales of survival.

(p. 45-67)
In the Far North, Louis Becke , Walter James Jeffery , 1901 single work short story
Jack Harrington's early years on Tinandra Downs cattle station on the Gilbert River were prosperous. He married a Sydney girl and employed Helen Alleyne as her companion. Helen is a girl to whom he had shown compassion after she tried to kill herself. But when the district is struck by drought his fortunes change dramatically, only to change again when the rains come and gold is discovered on his property.
(p. 68-100)
Jack Renton, Walter James Jeffery , Louis Becke , 1901 single work short story
Jack Renton left his home in the Orkneys in 1867. He was 18 when he arrived in Sydney and soon found himself on board the Reynard, a ship cruising for guano in the South Pacific. Life on board is hard and he joins a party of four men who desert their ship in a whaling boat, hoping for a life of ease on an island in the Pacific. After much hardship they arrive at Malayta [sic], in The Solomon Islands, where Jack remains until the arrival of the labour recruiting vessel, the Bobtail Nag, on 7 August, 1875.
(p. 101-112)
Sarreo, Louis Becke , Walter James Jeffery , 1901 single work short story
Supercargo, Denison, relates a story told to him about Sarreo, a Pacific Islander man, who was wrongly accused of theft but who later showed great courage in retrieving the body of the man who accused him.
(p. 113-131)
Officer and Man, Louis Becke , Walter James Jeffery , 1901 single work short story
While in port at Levuka, Rear-Admiral Garnet reluctantly agrees to meet a man who is asking to see him. The oily and obsequious Obadiah Howlman, who has aspirations to become a missionary, tells the Admiral that he believes a man called George Barcom is a deserter. However, his story is clearly motivated by his jealousy of Barcom, who has won the affections of Tuilangi, the daughter of an island king, and is living with her in the Yasawas. The Admiral reluctantly agrees to notify the commander of the H. M. S. Spitfire, which is on her way to Levuka. The Spitfire's lieutenant and a party of men are sent to bring him back, but the lieutenant knows Barcom's story and has other intentions.
(p. 132-158)
'The Gallant, Good Riou', Louis Becke , Walter James Jeffery , 1901 single work prose

Relates the story of Riou, one of Nelson's captains, whose ship, the Guardian, was badly damaged by an iceberg off the Cape of Good Hope while carrying provisions to N. S. W. The ship appeared doomed and the crew was given permission to leave, but Riou, three officers and a handful of men, including twenty convicts, remained on board. Against all odds they brought her back to the Cape of Good Hope nine weeks later. At Riou's request the twenty convicts were pardoned.

(p. 159-172)
The South Seaman : An Incident in the Sea Story of Australia, Louis Becke , Walter James Jeffery , 1901 single work short story

An account of the violent mutiny on the Sydney-bound brig, the Indefatigable in September 1828. The chief officer, Loftgreen, was kept aboard to act as navigator, while the other survivors of the mutiny were cast adrift in a longboat under the leadership of Todd, the second mate. All eventually reached Sydney, Todd and his party via Tahiti and Loftgreen via Guam, where the mutineers were tried and executed.

(p. 173-191)
Foster's Letter of Marque : A Tale of Old Sydney, Louis Becke , Walter James Jeffery , 1901 single work short story

Captain Charles Foster of the whaler, Policy, is much taken with Dorothy, the daughter of a Sydney official. He is planning to propose when, to his disgust, he discovers he has a rival. Foster and Dorothy quarrel and he sails away, not returning for two years. Again they quarrel and he leaves again, but when he returns he brings a prize that wins him honours and Dorothy's hand.

(p. 192-223)
The Adventure of Elizabeth Morey, of New York, Louis Becke , Walter James Jeffery , 1901 single work prose
The story of Elizabeth Morey, who was held captive by the inhabitants of Tonga for fifteen months. Her lover, and the captain of the ship in which she was travelling, was tricked by an escaped convict living on the island.
(p. 224-244)
The Americans in the South Seas, Louis Becke , Walter James Jeffery , 1901 single work prose
Account of the relationships and rivalries between English and American whalers and traders in the Pacific. According to Becke, the American trading and whaling industry in the Pacific region arose from the opportunity provided by the failure of Riou's ship, the Guardian, to deliver desperately needed supplies to penal N. S. W.
(p. 245-257)
The Brass Gun of the Buccaneers, Louis Becke , Walter James Jeffery , 1901 single work short story
Larmer is one of the many deserters and escaped criminals who find refuge in the Pacific Islands and are collectively known as 'beachcombers'. He has a reputation for violence and when the trader, Challoner, refuses to sell him an old Spanish brass cannon he has found Larcom vows he will have it. When his efforts to take the cannon result in the death of Challoner's native wife, Challoner exacts a gruesome revenge.
(p. 258-269)
Susani, Louis Becke , Walter James Jeffery , 1901 single work short story

When the narrator and his two companions are caught in a storm they seek shelter in a small cave. They discover a young girl sitting in the mouth of the cave singing softly in a strange dialect. She is Susani, believed by the local inhabitants to walk with, and have special protection from, God.

(p. 270-284)
The Brothers-in-Law : A Tale of the Equatorial Islands, Louis Becke , Walter James Jeffery , 1901 single work short story

Tavita, an elderly and respected native missionary, tells the story of Carter and West, two traders who had married Portuguese sisters, Luisa and Serena, and came to the island known as Peru to set up trading posts. Carter is discontented in his marriage to Serena and bitterly jealous of West, who married Luisa, the sister who had refused Carter. When Carter savagely beats Serena one night the village people rise up in her defence.

(p. 285-298)
Pakia, Louis Becke , Walter James Jeffery , 1901 single work short story

The narrator and his friend, Temana, are sleeping in the boatshed to escape the heat. They are joined by an old man, Pakia, who tells them of earlier times, the changes he has seen and the many places he has been, from Liverpool to New Zealand to Chile.

(p. 299-315)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

[Review] Tessa [and] The Trader's Wife [and] The Tapu of Banderah 1901 single work review
— Appears in: The Brisbane Courier , 6 April vol. 57 no. 13489 1901; (p. 13)

— Review of Tessa [and] The Trader's Wife Louis Becke , 1901 selected work novella ; The Tapu of Banderah Walter James Jeffery , Louis Becke , 1901 selected work short story
[Review] Tessa [and] The Trader's Wife [and] The Tapu of Banderah 1901 single work review
— Appears in: The Brisbane Courier , 6 April vol. 57 no. 13489 1901; (p. 13)

— Review of Tessa [and] The Trader's Wife Louis Becke , 1901 selected work novella ; The Tapu of Banderah Walter James Jeffery , Louis Becke , 1901 selected work short story
Last amended 30 Jun 2017 12:03:54
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