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person or book cover
SCreen cap from promotional trailer
form y separately published work icon Saw II single work   film/TV   horror  
Issue Details: First known date: 2005... 2005 Saw II
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

The sequel to the 2004 slasher film Saw, Saw II continues the narrative of 'Jigsaw', the killer whose complex and sadistic traps 'test' his victims. This film also reveals his apprentice, Amanda.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Twisted Pictures ,
      2005 .
      person or book cover
      SCreen cap from promotional trailer
      Extent: 95min.p.

Works about this Work

Time Is Wasting : Con/sequence and S/pace in the Saw Series Steve Jones , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Horror Studies , November vol. 1 no. 2 2010; (p. 225-239)

'Horror film sequels have not received as much serious critical attention as they deserve this is especially true of the Saw franchise, which has suffered a general dismissal under the derogatory banner Torture Porn. In this article I use detailed textual analysis of the Saw series to expound how film sequels employ and complicate expected temporal and spatial relations in particular, I investigate how the Saw sequels tie space and time into their narrative, methodological and moral sensibilities. Far from being a gimmick or a means of ensuring loyalty to the franchise (one has to be familiar with the events of previous episodes to ascertain what is happening), it is my contention that the Saw cycle directly requests that we examine the nature of space and time, in terms of both cinematic technique and our lived, off-screen temporal/spatial orientations.' (Publication abstract)

Time Is Wasting : Con/sequence and S/pace in the Saw Series Steve Jones , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Horror Studies , November vol. 1 no. 2 2010; (p. 225-239)

'Horror film sequels have not received as much serious critical attention as they deserve this is especially true of the Saw franchise, which has suffered a general dismissal under the derogatory banner Torture Porn. In this article I use detailed textual analysis of the Saw series to expound how film sequels employ and complicate expected temporal and spatial relations in particular, I investigate how the Saw sequels tie space and time into their narrative, methodological and moral sensibilities. Far from being a gimmick or a means of ensuring loyalty to the franchise (one has to be familiar with the events of previous episodes to ascertain what is happening), it is my contention that the Saw cycle directly requests that we examine the nature of space and time, in terms of both cinematic technique and our lived, off-screen temporal/spatial orientations.' (Publication abstract)

Last amended 26 Jul 2012 15:00:17
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