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form y separately published work icon Mystery Road single work   film/TV  
Alternative title: Moree Girls
Issue Details: First known date: 2013... 2013 Mystery Road
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Jay Swan, a detective, returns home to an outback town to solve the murder of a teenage Indigenous girl, whose body is found near a trucking route out of town.

Exhibitions

14131409

Notes

  • Prequel to Goldstone.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

An Open Letter to Jay Swan Anne Rutherford , 2020 single work prose
— Appears in: TEXT : The Journal of the Australian Association of Writing Programs , October vol. 24 no. 2 2020;
Hero or Dupe : Jay Swan and the Ambivalences of Aboriginal Masculinity in the Films of Ivan Sen Barry Judd , 2020 single work criticism
— Appears in: Cinematic Settlers : The Settler Colonial World in Film 2020; (p. 115-126)
Death, Neglect and Conspiracy in Mystery Road (Ivan Sen, 2013) Nicholas Bugeja , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , October no. 92 2019;

— Review of Mystery Road Ivan Sen , 2013 single work film/TV

'A dead Indigenous girl, no more than 16 years of age, is discovered in a drain underneath a highway in the aptly named Massacre Creek area. The drain is flanked by the wide, impossible expanses of outback Australia – a place where screams go unheard and violence can be wrought without any real fear of reprisal. Her throat has been cleanly slit by an unknown assailant for an unknown reason, and wild dogs have already taken to her corpse. This is how Ivan Sen’s Mystery Road opens.' (Introduction)

“Weird Melancholy” and the Modern Television Outback : Rage, Shame, and Violence in Wake in Fright and Mystery Road Jessica Gildersleeve , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: M/C Journal , vol. 22 no. 1 2019;

'In the middle of the nineteenth century, Marcus Clarke famously described the Australian outback as displaying a “Weird Melancholy” (qtd. in Gelder 116). The strange sights, sounds, and experiences of Australia’s rural locations made them ripe for the development of the European genre of the Gothic in a new location, a mutation which has continued over the past two centuries. But what does it mean for Australia’s Gothic landscapes to be associated with the affective qualities of the melancholy? And more particularly, how and why does this Gothic effect (and affect) appear in the most accessible Gothic media of the twenty-first century, the television series? Two recent Australian television adaptations, Wake in Fright (2017, dir. Kriv Stenders) and Mystery Road (2018, dir. Rachel Perkins) provoke us to ask the question: how does their pictorial representation of the Australian outback and its inhabitants overtly express rage and its close ties to melancholia, shame and violence? More particularly, I argue that in both series this rage is turned inwards rather than outwards; rage is turned into melancholy and thus to self-destruction – which constructs an allegory for the malaise of our contemporary nation. However, here the two series differ. While Wake in Fright posits this as a never-ending narrative, in a true Freudian model of melancholics who fail to resolve or attend to their trauma, Mystery Road is more positive in its positioning, allowing the themes of apology and recognition to appear, both necessary for reparation and forward movement.'

Source: Author's introduction.

Mystery Road Wins Award 2019 single work column
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 3 July no. 704 2019; (p. 3)
'Cast members of landmark ABC drama Mystery Road have been celebrated at the annual Equity Ensemble Awards, which honour outstanding performances by Australian actors.' 
Outback Western Takes Slow Road to Festival Opening Night Garry Maddox , 2013 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 7 June 2013; (p. 20)

— Review of Mystery Road Ivan Sen , 2013 single work film/TV
Weaving His Way Through Mystery Fiona Purdon , 2013 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 12 October 2013; (p. 14)

— Review of Mystery Road Ivan Sen , 2013 single work film/TV
Mystery Road : A Visual, Haunting Experience in a World in Desperate Need of Justice Woolombi Waters , 2013 single work column review
— Appears in: National Indigenous Times , 9 October vol. 12 no. 332 2013; (p. 17)

— Review of Mystery Road Ivan Sen , 2013 single work film/TV
A Sinister Landscape Sandra Hall , 2013 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 12 October 2013; (p. 14)

— Review of Mystery Road Ivan Sen , 2013 single work film/TV
Fine Outback Western Takes Satisfying Turns Craig Mathieson , 2013 single work review
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 13 October 2013; (p. 8) The Sunday Age , 13 October 2013; (p. 15)

— Review of Mystery Road Ivan Sen , 2013 single work film/TV
Promising Excursion along Mystery Road Michael Bodey , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 27 June 2012; (p. 15)
Winton Impresses as Setting for Matilda Movie Fiona Purdon , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 19 July 2012; (p. 16)
State's Other Sen-sational Film Director Fiona Purdon , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 17 December 2012; (p. 44)
Real-Life Killings Collide with Weaving's Reel Life Garry Maddox , 2013 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 12 May 2013; (p. 12)
A Mystery Marketer at Film Festival Daisy Dumas , 2013 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 7 June 2013; (p. 18)
Last amended 9 Jun 2016 13:41:56
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