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From the serialisation
y separately published work icon Murder of Olympia single work   novel   crime   detective  
Issue Details: First known date: 1956... 1956 Murder of Olympia
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Notes

  • Publication of this story was associated with a contest for which the first and second prizewinners were awarded £50 worth of double tickets for the Melbourne Olympic Games, return transport to Melbourne for two people and accommodation for two (room and breakfast) at the Hotel Chevron. The first prizewinner also received £100 cash to spend; the second prizewinner received £75.

    Contest entrants were required to read the first and second installments of Margot Neville's story and, in not more than 400 words, reveal how they would 'finish the plot'. The entries had to include 'the murderer's name, the motive and how the murder was done'.

    The winners were announced in the 3 October 1956 issue of the Australian Women's Weekly. First prize was awarded to 'an Adelaide housewife, Mrs. Catherine Gill'; second prize went to 'Mr. F. A. Woods, of Cambooya, Qld.' A third prize of £50 was won by 'Mrs. R. Baldwin, Clare, via Ayr, Qld.'

    Mr Woods commented that nothing would stop him attending the Melbourne Games: 'There won't be another Olympic contest here for 80 years', he predicted.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First known date: 1956
Serialised by: The Australian Women's Weekly 1933 periodical (200 issues)
Notes:
Serialised in three parts 27 June, 4 July and 3 October 1956.
Link: Web resource Digital copy of print publication via Australian Newspapers (AN) Service. Link is to the first instalment.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Geoffrey Bles ,
      1956 .
      image of person or book cover 7180393623941591040.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 224p.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Fontana ,
      1961 .
      image of person or book cover 7153394366994655159.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 190p.

Works about this Work

Issues of Class and Gender in Australian Crime Fiction : From the 1950s to Today Rachel Franks , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 96-111)
In this chapter, Rachel Franks notes ‘‘Australian crime fiction writers imported many types of crime fiction from Britain, including the gothic mystery and the Newgate novel, and from America, including the locked room mystery and the spy story.’ She observes how Australian crime fiction has changed along with the ‘societies that produce it.’ She concludes that for Australian crime fiction to be attractive to mass market and an assured popularity, Australian crime fiction writers must respond ‘to the changing demands of their readers,’ and ‘continue to develop the genre with increasingly sophisticated stories about murderers and those who bring them to justice.’ (Editor’s foreword xii)
Issues of Class and Gender in Australian Crime Fiction : From the 1950s to Today Rachel Franks , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 96-111)
In this chapter, Rachel Franks notes ‘‘Australian crime fiction writers imported many types of crime fiction from Britain, including the gothic mystery and the Newgate novel, and from America, including the locked room mystery and the spy story.’ She observes how Australian crime fiction has changed along with the ‘societies that produce it.’ She concludes that for Australian crime fiction to be attractive to mass market and an assured popularity, Australian crime fiction writers must respond ‘to the changing demands of their readers,’ and ‘continue to develop the genre with increasingly sophisticated stories about murderers and those who bring them to justice.’ (Editor’s foreword xii)
Last amended 15 Apr 2016 12:21:48
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