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image of person or book cover 5811047844814695955.jpg
Courtesy of Giramondo Publishing.
y separately published work icon Blue single work   graphic novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 2012... 2012 Blue
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Blue is the debut graphic novel by Australian cartoonist Pat Grant. Part autobiography and part science fiction, the book follows three spotty teenagers who skip school to go surfing and end up investigating rumors of a dead body on the train line. Provincial values and the emotions aroused by immigration clash as the teenagers encounter strange, blue-skinned foreigners that have arrived in their little beach town. Things become even more confronting when the trail leads them to make first contact with a new wave of immigrants to their coastal tow, who might be the harbingers of sweeping change.

'Blue is a delicate and affectionate portrayal of an iconic setting and way of life, told with an unerring ear and eye for the vernacular. But it's also a story about difference, fear and change, and the political implications of this for contemporary Australia.

'Pat Grant's approach to cartooning is largely an old-fashioned one, with each page of images painstakingly drawn on large pieces of illustration board with a sable brush and India ink. The images in Blue have been taken directly from drawings collected over many mornings on the beaches of NSW and Victoria; they are inspired by real life but don't lose their cartoonish charm. Combined with Grant's sparse writing the result is a cinematic story telling experience that lends itself particularly to an Australian experience of place and landscape.' (From the publisher's website.)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Link: Web resource Sighted: 10/12/2012
    • Artarmon, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Marietta, Georgia,
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Giramondo Publishing ; Top Shelf ,
      2012 .
      image of person or book cover 5811047844814695955.jpg
      Courtesy of Giramondo Publishing.
      Extent: 96p.
      Description: col. illus.
      ISBN: 1920882820 (hbk), 9781920882822 (hbk), 9781603091534, 9781920882914 (pbk.), 160309153X
    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Pat Grant , 2012 .
      Extent: 96p.
      Description: illus. (chiefly col.)
      Note/s:
      • Published online and in print.

        Publication date: May 2012.

Works about this Work

Visualising Risk in Pat Grant’s Blue : Xenophobia and Graphic Narrative Golnar Nabizadeh , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Textual Practice , March vol. 31 no. 3 2017; (p. 537-552)
'Published in 2012, Pat Grant’s debut graphic novel, Blue, depicts life in Bolton, a fictional Australian town that receives migrants who look noticeably different from the local community. Risk shapes Blue with regard to its aesthetic and formal concerns: the racism in Bolton places the foreigners at risk; Christian’s uneasy nostalgia depicts a community vulnerable to the ravages of time; and the work itself was self-published by Grant as a graphic novel. The genesis of the work arose from Grant’s accidental presence at the 2005 Cronulla riots in Sydney, a clash between Anglo and Middle Eastern Australians that brought to the fore questions about racism and community in Australian society. I argue that comics are highly suited to exploring ‘risky’ narratives because of the medium’s history as well as its formal properties. Comics have thus become popular vehicles for social criticism, frequently in the form of autobiography and memoir. As a highly mediated form, comics map time as space and in this article I argue that the form productively depicts the return of the past in the present – especially for pasts whose remembrance is inherently compromised or prohibited through other form of record in the visual archive.' (Publication abstract)
Invasion and the Politics of Belonging in Pat Grant's Blue Felicity Castagna , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: New Scholar , vol. 3 no. 1 2014;
In this essay, Felicity Castagna notes 'the long history of invasion narratives in Australian literature, and how they served to reify the governmental belonging of White Australians inciting nationalism and encouraging vigilance in relation to migration and national security.' (From introduction)
[Untitled] Trevor Donovan , 2013 single work review
— Appears in: Etchings , no. 12 2013; (p. 190-191)

— Review of Blue Pat Grant , 2012 single work graphic novel
Memory Palaces Luke Davies , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Monthly , June no. 79 2012; (p. 48-50)
'Luke Davies on Australia's budding graphic novel scene.'
Alien Concept Owen Heitmann , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 14-15 April 2012; (p. 33)

— Review of Blue Pat Grant , 2012 single work graphic novel
Surfer Dudes Take Graphic Route to Make Some Waves Sam Twyford-Moore , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 17-18 March 2012; (p. 20)

— Review of Blue Pat Grant , 2012 single work graphic novel
Surf, Sun and Racism Owen Heitmann , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: The Saturday Age , 31 March 2012; (p. 27)

— Review of Blue Pat Grant , 2012 single work graphic novel
Gammons, Nahs, and Youzes Ronnie Scott , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , April no. 340 2012; (p. 45)

— Review of Blue Pat Grant , 2012 single work graphic novel
Untitled Lucy Sussex , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 8 April 2012; (p. 19)

— Review of Blue Pat Grant , 2012 single work graphic novel
Bookshop Lucy Sussex , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 8 April 2012; (p. 15)

— Review of True North : The Story of Mary and Elizabeth Durack Brenda Niall , 2012 single work biography ; Blue Pat Grant , 2012 single work graphic novel
A Pair of Ragged Claws Stephen Romei , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 17-18 March 2012; (p. 19)
Memory Palaces Luke Davies , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Monthly , June no. 79 2012; (p. 48-50)
'Luke Davies on Australia's budding graphic novel scene.'
Invasion and the Politics of Belonging in Pat Grant's Blue Felicity Castagna , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: New Scholar , vol. 3 no. 1 2014;
In this essay, Felicity Castagna notes 'the long history of invasion narratives in Australian literature, and how they served to reify the governmental belonging of White Australians inciting nationalism and encouraging vigilance in relation to migration and national security.' (From introduction)
Visualising Risk in Pat Grant’s Blue : Xenophobia and Graphic Narrative Golnar Nabizadeh , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Textual Practice , March vol. 31 no. 3 2017; (p. 537-552)
'Published in 2012, Pat Grant’s debut graphic novel, Blue, depicts life in Bolton, a fictional Australian town that receives migrants who look noticeably different from the local community. Risk shapes Blue with regard to its aesthetic and formal concerns: the racism in Bolton places the foreigners at risk; Christian’s uneasy nostalgia depicts a community vulnerable to the ravages of time; and the work itself was self-published by Grant as a graphic novel. The genesis of the work arose from Grant’s accidental presence at the 2005 Cronulla riots in Sydney, a clash between Anglo and Middle Eastern Australians that brought to the fore questions about racism and community in Australian society. I argue that comics are highly suited to exploring ‘risky’ narratives because of the medium’s history as well as its formal properties. Comics have thus become popular vehicles for social criticism, frequently in the form of autobiography and memoir. As a highly mediated form, comics map time as space and in this article I argue that the form productively depicts the return of the past in the present – especially for pasts whose remembrance is inherently compromised or prohibited through other form of record in the visual archive.' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 10 May 2018 09:19:08
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