AustLit logo
The Disappearances Project single work   drama  
Issue Details: First known date: 2011... 2011 The Disappearances Project
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'When a person goes missing from a small community the effect can be devastating and wide-reaching. When their disappearance remains unsolved many years later, the effects of prolonged not-knowing are agonising. Tracing the trajectories of hope, anger and grief over years of police investigations in a range of unexplained disappearances, version 1.0 explore the effects of long-term missing persons cases on family members and regional communities. Following the journeys of those left behind in the wake of disappearances, "The Disappearances Project" explores the search for both lost loved ones and for the pieces of shattered lives.'

Source: version 1.0 website, http://www.versiononepointzero.com/
Sighted: 27/04/2011

Production Details

  • Produced by Performance Space, CarriageWorks and version 1.0 at Track 8, CarriageWorks, Sydney, 3-7 May 2011.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Dramaturgies of the Left-Behind : Mobility and Stickiness in The Disappearances Project Suzanne Little , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Theatre Research International , October vol. 41 no. 3 2016; (p. 245-257)

'In the verbatim theatre performance The Disappearances Project (2011-13), Australian company Version 1.0 explored the state of unresolved loss felt by those left behind by missing persons. Rather than relying on verbatim testimony to simply 'tell' the stories of the left-behind, directors Yana Taylor and David Williams sought to immerse the audience in an indeterminate world, characterized by pathologies of endless searching and waiting, and a sense of paralysing loss. In this article, I argue that the performance hinged on dramaturgical practices of stillness, slowed movement and friction to produce the disturbing sense of 'sticky' indeterminacy characteristic of the experience of the left-behind. To develop this interpretation, I turn to the post-disciplinary field of mobility studies, which highlights the movement (or otherwise) of people, objects, information and capital, as well as embodied experience and sensory and kinesthetic environments. This provides ways to identify and analyse mobility-as-dramaturgy as well as the co-production of affective atmospheres within Disappearances and the wider field of performance. (Publication abstract)

Friends of Missing Have Voices Heard Harry Brumpton , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 26 June 2012; (p. 40)

— Review of The Disappearances Project Version 1.0 , 2011 single work drama
Dark Pain of Searching for Missing Loved Ones Bridget Cormack , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian , 3 May 2011; (p. 17)

— Review of The Disappearances Project Version 1.0 , 2011 single work drama
Feel the Unyielding, Exhausting Pain of Not Knowing Jason Blake , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 22-24 April 2011; (p. 13)

— Review of The Disappearances Project Version 1.0 , 2011 single work drama
Feel the Unyielding, Exhausting Pain of Not Knowing Jason Blake , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 22-24 April 2011; (p. 13)

— Review of The Disappearances Project Version 1.0 , 2011 single work drama
Dark Pain of Searching for Missing Loved Ones Bridget Cormack , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian , 3 May 2011; (p. 17)

— Review of The Disappearances Project Version 1.0 , 2011 single work drama
Friends of Missing Have Voices Heard Harry Brumpton , 2012 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 26 June 2012; (p. 40)

— Review of The Disappearances Project Version 1.0 , 2011 single work drama
Dramaturgies of the Left-Behind : Mobility and Stickiness in The Disappearances Project Suzanne Little , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Theatre Research International , October vol. 41 no. 3 2016; (p. 245-257)

'In the verbatim theatre performance The Disappearances Project (2011-13), Australian company Version 1.0 explored the state of unresolved loss felt by those left behind by missing persons. Rather than relying on verbatim testimony to simply 'tell' the stories of the left-behind, directors Yana Taylor and David Williams sought to immerse the audience in an indeterminate world, characterized by pathologies of endless searching and waiting, and a sense of paralysing loss. In this article, I argue that the performance hinged on dramaturgical practices of stillness, slowed movement and friction to produce the disturbing sense of 'sticky' indeterminacy characteristic of the experience of the left-behind. To develop this interpretation, I turn to the post-disciplinary field of mobility studies, which highlights the movement (or otherwise) of people, objects, information and capital, as well as embodied experience and sensory and kinesthetic environments. This provides ways to identify and analyse mobility-as-dramaturgy as well as the co-production of affective atmospheres within Disappearances and the wider field of performance. (Publication abstract)

Last amended 27 Apr 2011 16:02:30
X