AustLit logo
y separately published work icon The End of Longing single work   novel   historical fiction   mystery  
Issue Details: First known date: 2011... 2011 The End of Longing
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Frances, a young New Zealand woman, is laid to rest in an unmarked grave in Jamaica in 1894. Her enigmatic husband, the Rev. William Hammond, cannot be found. Reports are later sent to her brothers alleging fraud and, perhaps, murder.

Hammond has long been a restless and elusive traveller, and the credentials of someone who moves so often from place to place are not easy to verify.

When Frances joins him the allure of exotic journeys is soon overshadowed by a sense of foreboding. Does he really want her or is she in the way?

The End of Longing is a thrilling, bitter-beautiful novel which skilfully explores troubled identity and complex motives.' (From the publisher's website.)

Notes

  • Dedication: To the custodians of family stories.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Crawley, Inner Perth, Perth, Western Australia,: UWA Publishing , 2011 .
      Extent: 300p.
      Note/s:
      • Publication date: March 2011.
      ISBN: 9781742582740, 9781742582740

Works about this Work

Reading as Displacement and Time Travel Ian Reid , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: English in Australia , vol. 48 no. 1 2013; (p. 65-70)

'A national survey of senior secondary English curriculum content has confirmed that contemporary literature predominates among set texts, being seen as an ‘essential’ category for study because of its ‘relevance’ in helping students ‘understand the world in which they live.’ Perhaps uncontentious – depending on the meaning of that phrase ‘contemporary literature’: is it what’s written in our own time, or also set in our own time? Too much of the latter could mean that

students’ reading confines them narrowly to the here and now. Part of our responsibility as educators is to help our students go beyond the familiar, and to reframe their experience of the world in which they live by introducing them to worlds elsewhere. Their understanding needs to move across time as well as across different places. In considering what these principles imply in practice for the selection and interpretation of texts, this article combines the perspectives of teacher, curriculum designer and

fiction writer.' (Author's abstract)

Itinerant Reading, Itinerant Writing : Teaching Australian Literature Contextually Ian Reid , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 16-30)
'Australian literature is like literature in general, only more so: what characterises all reading and writing is embodied with special intensity in this case. Why? Because when you read or write in an Australian context, your imagination is unavoidably and utterly itinerant.' (Author's introduction, 16)
Dark Saga of Lives Gone Wrong Anne Susskind , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 25 - 26 June 2011; (p. 37)

— Review of The End of Longing Ian Reid , 2011 single work novel
Untitled Kay Hart , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Transnational Literature , May vol. 3 no. 2 2011;

— Review of The End of Longing Ian Reid , 2011 single work novel
Melodrama Draws on 19th-Century Drama Peter Pierce , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 14 -15 May 2011; (p. 20)

— Review of The End of Longing Ian Reid , 2011 single work novel
The Rest Is History Gemma Nisbet , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The West Australian , 19 February 2011; (p. 37)

— Review of The End of Longing Ian Reid , 2011 single work novel
Untitled Lyndal More , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Bookseller + Publisher Magazine , March vol. 90 no. 6 2011; (p. 32)

— Review of The End of Longing Ian Reid , 2011 single work novel
Fiction Gemma Nisbet , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The West Australian , 5 March 2011; (p. 36)

— Review of The End of Longing Ian Reid , 2011 single work novel
Off the Shelf : Fiction Dianne Dempsey , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: The Saturday Age , 12 March 2011; (p. 40)

— Review of The End of Longing Ian Reid , 2011 single work novel
Known Unknowns Jeffrey Poacher , 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , May no. 331 2011; (p. 31)

— Review of The End of Longing Ian Reid , 2011 single work novel
Itinerant Reading, Itinerant Writing : Teaching Australian Literature Contextually Ian Reid , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 16-30)
'Australian literature is like literature in general, only more so: what characterises all reading and writing is embodied with special intensity in this case. Why? Because when you read or write in an Australian context, your imagination is unavoidably and utterly itinerant.' (Author's introduction, 16)
Reading as Displacement and Time Travel Ian Reid , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: English in Australia , vol. 48 no. 1 2013; (p. 65-70)

'A national survey of senior secondary English curriculum content has confirmed that contemporary literature predominates among set texts, being seen as an ‘essential’ category for study because of its ‘relevance’ in helping students ‘understand the world in which they live.’ Perhaps uncontentious – depending on the meaning of that phrase ‘contemporary literature’: is it what’s written in our own time, or also set in our own time? Too much of the latter could mean that

students’ reading confines them narrowly to the here and now. Part of our responsibility as educators is to help our students go beyond the familiar, and to reframe their experience of the world in which they live by introducing them to worlds elsewhere. Their understanding needs to move across time as well as across different places. In considering what these principles imply in practice for the selection and interpretation of texts, this article combines the perspectives of teacher, curriculum designer and

fiction writer.' (Author's abstract)

Last amended 24 Jun 2011 08:45:33
Settings:
  • c
    New Zealand,
    c
    Pacific Region,
  • c
    Australia,
    c
  • Asia,
  • c
    Jamaica,
    c
    Caribbean, Americas,
  • 1800-1899
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X