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y separately published work icon Lantana Lane single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1959... 1959 Lantana Lane
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Notes

  • Other formats: Also braille and sound recording.

Contents

* Contents derived from the London,
c
England,
c
c
United Kingdom (UK),
c
Western Europe, Europe,
:
Virago , 1986 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Dazzling Writing : Introduction to the Virago Version of Eleanor Dark's Lantana Lane, Helen Garner , 1986 single work criticism

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Sydney, New South Wales,: Collins ,
      1959 .
      Extent: 254p.
      ISBN: 0860685772 (pbk.)
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Virago ,
      1986 .
      Extent: xv, 254p.p.
      ISBN: 0860685772 (pbk)
    • Crows Nest, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Allen and Unwin , 2012 .
      person or book cover
      Image courtesy of Allen & Unwin
      Extent: 254p.
      ISBN: 9781743313367 (pbk.)

Works about this Work

‘This Long and Shining Finger of the Sea Itself’ : Sydney Harbour and Regional Cosmopolitanism in Eleanor Dark’s Waterway Melinda J. Cooper , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 17 no. 1 2017;

'In Eleanor Dark’s novel Waterway (1938), Professor Channon is prompted by the ominous international headline ‘Failure of Peace Talks’ to imagine the world from a global perspective (120). Channon feels himself metaphorically ‘lifted away from the earth … seeing it from an incredible distance, and with an incredible, an all-embracing comprehension’ (119-20). This move outward from a located perspective to ‘a more detached overview of a wider global space’ signifies a cosmopolitan viewpoint, ‘in which the viewing subject rises above the placebound attachments of the nation-state to take the measure of the world as a wider totality’ (Hegglund 8-9). Yet even this global view is mediated by Channon’s position from within ‘a great island continent alone in its south sea’ (121). Gazing from a ‘vast distance,’ he views Europe as ‘the patches where parasitic man had lived longest and most densely,’ and from which humankind ‘went out to infect fresh lands’ (120). This description of old world Europe as ‘parasitic’ provides a glimpse of resistant nationalism, reflecting Channon’s location within one of the ‘fresh lands’ affected by colonisation. Channon is ultimately unable to sustain a ‘Godlike’ perspective in this scene, desiring ‘nothing but to return’ to local place (121). Although his view initially ‘vaults beyond the bounds of national affiliation’ (Alexander and Moran 4), this move outward does not ‘nullify an affective attachment to the more grounded locations of human attachment’ (Hegglund 20). Channon’s return to the ‘shabby home … of his own humanity’ brings a renewed sense of connection to ‘the sun-warmed rail of the gate’ and ‘the faint breeze [which] ruffled the hair back from his forehead’ (122).' (Introduction)

The Art of Living: Vance Palmer and Eleanor Dark on the Sunshine Coast Belinda McKay , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Queensland Review , December vol. 24 no. 2 2017; (p. 202-214)

Vance Palmer's The Passage (1930) and Eleanor Dark's Lantana Lane (1959) bracket the period during which the narrow coastal strip north of Brisbane from the Pumicestone Passage to the Noosa River was being transformed economically and culturally into what we know today as the Sunshine Coast. In the 1920s and 1950s respectively, Palmer and Dark participated in changing the region, and as established writers they reflected upon that metamorphosis in literary works that reached a national audience at a time when Brisbane's near north coast was off the beaten track for professional writers. But for millennia prior to colonisation, this area had sustained a vibrant economy and culture centred on bunyas from the mountains and seafood from the coast. By the late nineteenth century, this vast economic and cultural network had been radically disrupted by the incursions of timber-getters and pastoralists, and many of the traditional owners who had survived the frontier wars had been removed. While the inscription of a new identity on the region in the twentieth century was driven by the real estate speculators who coined the name ‘Sunshine Coast’, Palmer in The Passage and Dark in Lantana Lane share a more cooperative, sustainable, egalitarian and anti-imperialist vision for the region, with some indirect and ambiguous debts to its Aboriginal past.

‘[W]hen the Highway Catches up with Us’ : Negotiating Late Modernity in Eleanor Dark's Lantana Lane Melinda Cooper , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Queensland Review , vol. 23 no. 2 2016; (p. 207-223)
'Eleanor Dark's last published novel, Lantana Lane (published 1959), is not usually included in accounts of Australian modernism. The novel's strong criticisms of modernity, its regional focus and the Cold War context complicate its inclusion as a modernist text. However, revised understandings of modernism generated in the past few decades of scholarship allow for a reinvestigation of Dark's novel as a response to the conditions of late modernity. In particular, Dark explores the pressures exerted on local space by modern capitalism in a period of post-war reconstruction, showing how the national and global scales encroach upon and threaten to annihilate local particularity. Through drawing on a number of broadly modernist practices, including those of entanglement, suspension, metageography and primitivism, Dark pushes back against modernity's narratives of progress and attempts to recover space for the literary and the small scale. Lantana Lane demonstrates how ‘regional modernisms’ written from ‘peripheral’ locations can draw attention to the uneven distribution of modernity within national and global space, and offer alternative — if provisional — sites of attachment.' (Publication abstract)
“Dazzling” Dark – Lantana Lane (1959) Helen O'Reilly , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 72 no. 1 2012; (p. 71-80)
'World War II, and the Cold War which followed it, were years of stresses and strain for Eleanor Dark. When Lantana Lane appeared in 1959, signalling, as it turned out, the end of her literary career and seemingly light years away from her previous work, it was the culmination of two intense decades. At the beginning of 1940 she was still engaged in the long, laborious research for The Timeless Land trilogy, making daily trips to the Mitchell Library, even in the dead of winter. She was sharing the civilian experience of food shortages, wartime restrictions and rationing. Despite the popular and critical success of The Timeless Land (1941), top of The London Times' Christmas fiction list and the Book of the Month in the U.S. in October, repeatedly in letters to her publishers Dark declared herself "bothered" by her immersion in the past.' (Author's abstract)
Writing from the Hinterland : Eleanor Dark's Queensland Years Belinda McKay , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Queensland Review , November vol. 8 no. 2 2001; (p. 21-28)
Happy Families 1959 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 24 June vol. 80 no. 4141 1959; (p. 2)

— Review of Lantana Lane Eleanor Dark , 1959 single work novel
Untitled Sidney J. Baker , 1959 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 23 May 1959; (p. 13)

— Review of Lantana Lane Eleanor Dark , 1959 single work novel
Untitled 1959 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 10 April 1959; (p. 214)

— Review of Lantana Lane Eleanor Dark , 1959 single work novel
Untitled T. Harri Jones , 1959 single work review
— Appears in: Quadrant , Summer (1959-1960) vol. 4 no. 1 1959; (p. 93-94)

— Review of Lantana Lane Eleanor Dark , 1959 single work novel
Untitled 1966 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , May vol. 5 no. 7 1966; (p. 146)

— Review of Lantana Lane Eleanor Dark , 1959 single work novel
“Dazzling” Dark – Lantana Lane (1959) Helen O'Reilly , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 72 no. 1 2012; (p. 71-80)
'World War II, and the Cold War which followed it, were years of stresses and strain for Eleanor Dark. When Lantana Lane appeared in 1959, signalling, as it turned out, the end of her literary career and seemingly light years away from her previous work, it was the culmination of two intense decades. At the beginning of 1940 she was still engaged in the long, laborious research for The Timeless Land trilogy, making daily trips to the Mitchell Library, even in the dead of winter. She was sharing the civilian experience of food shortages, wartime restrictions and rationing. Despite the popular and critical success of The Timeless Land (1941), top of The London Times' Christmas fiction list and the Book of the Month in the U.S. in October, repeatedly in letters to her publishers Dark declared herself "bothered" by her immersion in the past.' (Author's abstract)
Dazzling Writing : Introduction to the Virago Version of Eleanor Dark's Lantana Lane Helen Garner , 1986 single work criticism
— Appears in: Lantana Lane 1986; Eight Voices of the Eighties : Stories, Journalism and Criticism by Australian Women Writers 1989; (p. 376-382)
y separately published work icon Eleanor Dark : A Writer's Life Barbara Brooks , Judith Clark , Sydney : Pan Macmillan Australia , 1998 Z307927 1998 single work biography
Morning with Eleanor Dark Patrick Buckridge , 1997 single work column biography
— Appears in: Notes & Furphies , April-May no. 38 1997; (p. 10)
Writing from the Hinterland : Eleanor Dark's Queensland Years Belinda McKay , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Queensland Review , November vol. 8 no. 2 2001; (p. 21-28)
Last amended 1 Nov 2012 15:19:09
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