AustLit logo
image of person or book cover 3341201001768187910.jpg
y separately published work icon Leviathan Trilogy series - author   novel   young adult   science fiction  
Issue Details: First known date: 2009... 2009 Leviathan Trilogy
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

Exhibitions

10701630
10689157

Includes

1
y separately published work icon Leviathan Scott Westerfeld , New York (City) : Simon Pulse , 2009 Z1632486 2009 single work novel young adult science fiction

'It is the cusp of World War I, and all the European powers are arming up. The Austro-Hungarians and Germans have their Clankers, steam-driven iron machines loaded with guns and ammunition. The British Darwinists employ fabricated animals as their weaponry. Their Leviathan is a whale airship, and the most masterful beast in the British fleet.

'Aleksandar Ferdinand, prince of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, is on the run. His own people have turned on him. His title is worthless. All he has is a battle-torn Stormwalker and a loyal crew of men. Deryn Sharp is a commoner, a girl disguised as a boy in the British Air Service. She's a brilliant airman. But her secret is in constant danger of being discovered. With the Great War brewing, Alek's and Deryn's paths cross in the most unexpected way ... taking them both aboard the Leviathan on a fantastical, around-the-world adventure. One that will change both their lives forever.' (From the Penguin website.)

2
y separately published work icon Behemoth Scott Westerfeld , Camberwell : Viking , 2010 Z1742433 2010 single work novel young adult science fiction

'The Austro-Hungarians and Germans have their Clankers, steam-driven iron machines loaded with guns and ammunition. The British Darwinists employ fabricated animals as their weaponry. Their Leviathan is a whale airship, and the most masterful beast in the British fleet.

'The behemoth is the fiercest creature in the British navy. It can swallow enemy battleships with one bite. The Darwinists will need it, now that they are at war with the Clanker Powers.

Deryn is a girl posing as a boy in the British Air Service, and Alek is the heir to an empire posing as a commoner. Finally together aboard the airship Leviathan, they hope to bring the war to a halt. But when disaster strikes the Leviathan's peacekeeping mission, they find themselves alone and hunted in enemy territory.

Alek and Deryn will need great skill, new allies, and brave hearts to face what’s ahead.' (From the publisher's website.)

3
y separately published work icon Goliath Scott Westerfeld , Camberwell : Viking , 2011 Z1811675 2011 single work novel science fiction young adult 'Alek and Deryn are aboard the Leviathan when the ship is ordered to pick up an unusual passenger. This brilliant, maniacal inventor claims to have a weapon called Goliath. It can end the war. But whose side is the inventor really on?

While on their top-secret mission, Alek finally discovers Deryn's deeply kept secret. Not only is Deryn a girl disguised as a boy ... she also has feelings for Alek.

The crown, true love with a commoner, and the destruction of a great city all hang on Alek's next and final move.

The thunderous conclusion to Scott Westerfeld's Leviathan series.' (Publisher's blurb)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First known date: 2009
    • Camberwell, Camberwell - Kew area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Viking , 2009- .

Works about this Work

Steampunk Technologies of Gender : Deryn Sharp's Nonbinary Gender Identity in Scott Westerfeld's Leviathan Series Lisa Hager , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Virtual Victorians : Networks, Connections, Technologies 2015; (p. 215-230)
y separately published work icon Contemplating 'What if?' : Allohistoric Reconstructions of Victorian Restrictions in Young Adult Steampunk Brett Carol Young , Lafayette : 2014 10707591 2014 single work thesis

'Simply stated, steampunk literature is a hybrid genre of allohistory in steam-based science fiction that analyzes the restrictions and marginalizations found in the social issues of the Victorian period. This dissertation argues the allohistoric reconstructions in young adult steampunk didactically suggest that the power to change the future is in the hands of the individual who is able to personally alter the restrictions placed upon him or her by the social ideals of the Victorian period. In other words, protagonists of young adult steampunk consciously act against the restrictions of their past in order to create a different future for themselves, and hopefully others. The dissertation is divided into two distinct sections: the first examines how history and allohistory are presented within all types of children's and young adult literature; the second presents the ways in which steampunk elements found in allohistory interact with the presentation of factual historical social concepts while interacting with the past, present, and future. Furthermore, this dissertation argues that steampunk illustrates the effects each part of history (the past, present, and future) has on itself, so that one cannot be separated from the other, as demonstrated in Scott Westerfeld's Leviathan trilogy (2009–2011), Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials (1995–2001), and Philip Reeve's Predator Cities quartet (2001–2006). Finally, this dissertation argues that steampunk maintains that history is not doomed to repeat itself if the present takes note of the restrictions of the past and applies them towards changing the future. In doing so, this dissertation helps to relieve an obvious gap in literary steampunk criticism while defining the ways steampunk fits within the children's and young adult literary landscape.'

Source: Abstract.

y separately published work icon Contemplating 'What if?' : Allohistoric Reconstructions of Victorian Restrictions in Young Adult Steampunk Brett Carol Young , Lafayette : 2014 10707591 2014 single work thesis

'Simply stated, steampunk literature is a hybrid genre of allohistory in steam-based science fiction that analyzes the restrictions and marginalizations found in the social issues of the Victorian period. This dissertation argues the allohistoric reconstructions in young adult steampunk didactically suggest that the power to change the future is in the hands of the individual who is able to personally alter the restrictions placed upon him or her by the social ideals of the Victorian period. In other words, protagonists of young adult steampunk consciously act against the restrictions of their past in order to create a different future for themselves, and hopefully others. The dissertation is divided into two distinct sections: the first examines how history and allohistory are presented within all types of children's and young adult literature; the second presents the ways in which steampunk elements found in allohistory interact with the presentation of factual historical social concepts while interacting with the past, present, and future. Furthermore, this dissertation argues that steampunk illustrates the effects each part of history (the past, present, and future) has on itself, so that one cannot be separated from the other, as demonstrated in Scott Westerfeld's Leviathan trilogy (2009–2011), Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials (1995–2001), and Philip Reeve's Predator Cities quartet (2001–2006). Finally, this dissertation argues that steampunk maintains that history is not doomed to repeat itself if the present takes note of the restrictions of the past and applies them towards changing the future. In doing so, this dissertation helps to relieve an obvious gap in literary steampunk criticism while defining the ways steampunk fits within the children's and young adult literary landscape.'

Source: Abstract.

Steampunk Technologies of Gender : Deryn Sharp's Nonbinary Gender Identity in Scott Westerfeld's Leviathan Series Lisa Hager , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Virtual Victorians : Networks, Connections, Technologies 2015; (p. 215-230)
Last amended 7 Mar 2017 11:26:23
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X