AustLit logo
person or book cover
Memo (George Kapiniaris) and Liz (Tracey Callander) Source: Screen cap episode 1.5
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'When Kostas Stephanidis came to this country 23 years ago with 20 pounds in his pocket, one suitcase and his fathers pants, he opened a small Greek café, Acropolis, where old men played cards and drank coffee. Now he has decided to retreat to an idyllic lifestyle in the Greek islands, leaving his one and only son, Jim, to uphold the café and family tradition. After careful thought however, rather than entrust his beloved Acropolis café to his only son, Jim, Kostas insists on putting someone more sensible in charge. Jim's pal, Ricky, he has brains - he's been a College Student! Amid cultures clashing - and crockery smashing - Jim and Ricky generate riches all right. But strictly in the form of laughs. The key writers of "Acropolis Now" are also in the cast. Nick Giannopolis, George Kapiniaris and Simon Palomares. The unique trio who were responsible for having staged Australia's longest running stage comedy, "Wogs Out Of Work".'
Source: http://www.australiantelevision.net/acropolis_now/index.html Sighted 04/07/12

Notes

  • Acropolis Now helped popularise the term 'skippy' or 'skip' to refer to people of Anglo-Australian descent. The term became partiuclarly popular within the Mediterranean/Australian community, and especially in Melbourne.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First known date: 1989

Works about this Work

Whatever Happened to Multiculturalism? Here Come the Habibs!, Race, Identity and Representation Jon Stratton , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum : Journal of Media & Cultural Studies , vol. 31 no. 2 2017; (p. 242-256)
'In February 2016 Channel Nine broadcast six episodes of Here Come the Habibs!. The show was a comedy about a Lebanese-Australian family who win 22 million dollars in the lottery and move from working-class Lakemba to upper-class Vaucluse where they buy a house next to the very white O’Neills. The show invokes key tropes of official multiculturalism most importantly race and identity. At the same time, official multiculturalism has been in decline in Australia since the advent of John Howard’s conservative prime ministership in 1996. Official multiculturalism focused on ethnic groups and their cultures. It has been supplanted by the ideas of neoliberalism which is concerned above all with individuals and the market. In this article I argue that Here Come the Habibs! is, in the end, nostalgic for a multiculturalism which is no longer privileged in Australia. The dynamics of the tension between the Habibs and O’Neills has been displaced, as is signalled in the final episode of the show, by the entry into Australia of a mobile, cosmopolitan elite whose worth is measured not in their culture but in what they can economically contribute to the country.'
Wog Bruce Moore , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: Ozwords , April vol. 19 no. 1 2010; (p. 1-3)
Wog Bruce Moore , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: Ozwords , April vol. 19 no. 1 2010; (p. 1-3)
Whatever Happened to Multiculturalism? Here Come the Habibs!, Race, Identity and Representation Jon Stratton , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum : Journal of Media & Cultural Studies , vol. 31 no. 2 2017; (p. 242-256)
'In February 2016 Channel Nine broadcast six episodes of Here Come the Habibs!. The show was a comedy about a Lebanese-Australian family who win 22 million dollars in the lottery and move from working-class Lakemba to upper-class Vaucluse where they buy a house next to the very white O’Neills. The show invokes key tropes of official multiculturalism most importantly race and identity. At the same time, official multiculturalism has been in decline in Australia since the advent of John Howard’s conservative prime ministership in 1996. Official multiculturalism focused on ethnic groups and their cultures. It has been supplanted by the ideas of neoliberalism which is concerned above all with individuals and the market. In this article I argue that Here Come the Habibs! is, in the end, nostalgic for a multiculturalism which is no longer privileged in Australia. The dynamics of the tension between the Habibs and O’Neills has been displaced, as is signalled in the final episode of the show, by the entry into Australia of a mobile, cosmopolitan elite whose worth is measured not in their culture but in what they can economically contribute to the country.'
Subjects:
  • ca. 1980s
  • ca. 1990s
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X